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Full text of "Bulletin"

LIBRARY 



OF THE 




MASSACHUSETTS 

AGRICULTURAL 

COLLEGE 



SOURCE LD 

3234 
M221 




ConTervTs 

v. V 

No. 1. Catalogue o^ tne MAC iqtZ-\3. 
.. £ hH^tn annual -report o£ 1V M/\.C 
.. 3 Sum-mar schools IS13. 

.. 3 su^. ocWool -\ ov rural Social workers . 
.. 4 Catalogue. o£ "Ttae <?ra<AiAaiTes ana 

-£ovYner stucUrts o^ M./VC 
... b Ser\d\T\^ tne. collie t"o tV\e state.. 

.. G. Short courses 1914. 



THE M. A. C. BULLETIN 

AMHERST, MASS. 
Vol. V. No. I. For January, 1913 

Published Six Times a Year by the College. 
Jan., Feb., Mar., May, Sept., Oct. 

Entered as Second-class Mail Matter at the Post Officii, Amherst, Mass. 

Public Document No. 31 

CATALOGUE 

OF THE 

Massachusetts 
Agricultural College, 

1912-1913. 



Fiftieth Annual Report. 
Part II. 




BOSTON : 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 

1 8 Post Office Square. 

1913- 



Withcrat excluding other scientific and classical studies, and including military tactics 
to teach such branches of learning as are related to agriculture and the mechanic arts in 
such manner as the legislatures of the states may respectively prescribe, in order to 
promote the liberal and practical education of the industrial classes in the several pursuits 
and professions of life. — Act of Congress, July 2, 1862. 



Massachusetts 
Agricultural College, 

AMHERST. 



Catalogue, 1912-1913. 




BOSTON: 

WEIGHT & POTTEE PEINTING CO., STATE PEINTEES, 

18 Post Office Square. 

1913. 



3 7 s . 73 



Approved by 
The State Board op Publication. 



The Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 



This issue of the catalogue represents the status of the college for the 
current college year, with provisional announcement of courses of study and 
other matters for the year to follow. 



The college reserves, for itself and its departments, the right to withdraw 
or change the announcements made in its catalogue. Special publication will 
be made should it become necessary on account of important changes. 



Calendar. 



1913-14. 



Regular Courses. 



1913. 



January 6, Monday, 1.10 p.m., . 

January 24, Friday, 

February 3, Monday, 1.10 p.m., 

March 28, Friday, 6 p.m., 

April 7, Monday, 1.10 p.m., 

May 30, Friday, 

May 31, Saturday, . 

June 7, Saturday, 

June 14—18, Saturday— Wednesday, 

June 19—21, Thursday— Saturday, 

September 3—6, Wednesday— Saturday, 

September 10, Wednesday, 1.30 P.M., 

October 13, Monday forenoon, . 



November 26-December 1, Wednesday, 1 

p.M.-Monday, 1.10 p.m., chapel, . 
December 19, Friday, 6 P.M., . 



Winter recess ends ; chapel. 
Semester examinations begin. 
Second semester begins ; chapel. 
Spring recess begins. 
Spring recess ends. 
Holiday, Memorial Day. 
Senior examinations begin. 
Non-senior examinations begin. 
Commencement. 
Entrance examinations. 
Entrance examinations. 
First semester begins ; chapel. 
Half holiday, observance of Columbus 
Day. 

Thanksgiving recess. 
Winter recess begins. 



1914. 



January 5, Monday, 1.10 p.m., 
January 23, Friday, 
February 2, Monday, 1.10 p.m., 
February 23, Monday forenoon, 

March 27, Friday, 6 p.m., 
April 6, Monday, 1.10 p.m., 
April 20, Monday forenoon, 

June 1, Monday, 

June 6, Saturday, 

June 13— June 17, Saturday— Wednesday, 

June 18—20, Thursday— Saturday, 



Winter recess ends ; chapel. 

Semester examinations begin. 

Second semester begins ; chapel. 

Half holiday, observance of Washing- 
ton's Birthday. 

Spring recess begins. 

Spring recess ends. 

Half holiday, observance of Patriots' 
Day. 

Senior examinations begin. 

Non-senior examinations begin. 

Commencement. 

Entrance examinations. 



Massachusetts Agricultural College. 



History. — The Massachusetts Agricultural College was among the first 
of those organized under the national land grant act of 1862. This act 
granted public lands to the several States and Territories, the funds realized 
from the sale of which should be used to establish colleges of agriculture 
and mechanic arts; the bill was framed by the late Senator Justin Smith 
Morrill of Vermont. The Legislature of Massachusetts has granted money 
for the erection of nearly all the buildings now on the grounds, and makes 
annual appropriations for the maintenance of the college. 

The college was incorporated in 1863, and on the 2d of October, 1867, was 
formally opened to its first class of students. At that time four buildings 
had been erected, and there were four regular instructors employed by the 
institution. In 1882 the State located its agricultural experiment station on 
the grounds of the college. Later, after the federal law was passed granting 
financial aid to experiment stations, the Massachusetts Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station was consolidated with the federal station, and subsequently the 
whole was incorporated with the college. 

Courses. — The college offers an education without tuition fee to any 
student who is a resident of Massachusetts and who meets the requirements 
for admission. Women are admitted on the same basis as are men. Students 
who are not residents of Massachusetts are required to pay a nominal tuition 
fee. The four -years 1 course leads to the degree of bachelor of science, and 
the graduate school offers advanced courses leading to the degrees of master 
of science and doctor of philosophy. The winter school of ten weeks, for 
admission to which no scholastic requirements are made, is held each winter, 
beginning early in January. There are other short courses at the college, 
such as the beekeepers' course and summer school. Various forms of exten- 
sion teaching are carried on away from the college, such as correspondence 
courses, traveling schools, educational exhibits, lecture courses, demonstra- 
tions, etc. % 

Purpose op the College. — The chief purpose of the college is to prepare 
men and women for the agricultural vocations. In this statement the term 
" agricultural vocations " is used in its broadest sense. Courses are offered 
which give efficient training in various agricultural pursuits, such as general 
farming, dairying, management of estates, poultry husbandry, fruit grow- 
ing, market gardening, landscape gardening and forestry. Students are also 
fitted for positions in institutions designed for investigation in many sciences 

1 Twenty-six teaching departments offer instruction in agriculture, horticulture, 
sciences, the humanities and rural social science. A system of major courses has 
recently been adopted which permits a student to elect work in 1 of 14 departments 
and to specialize in that and allied subjects for a period of two years. 



8 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [Jan. 

underlying the great agricultural industry, for teaching in agricultural col- 
leges and high schools, for scientific experts in chemistry, entomology and 
botany, and for business operations having connection with practical agri- 
culture. 

Though the agricultural vocations are thus the chief concern of the college, 
students also find the course one that fits them admirably for pursuits in 
which the sciences, particularly chemistry, botany and zoology, are an essen- 
tial preparation. Still other students find the course a desirable education, 
without regard to future occupation. The course of study is designed to give 
a student a general college education, and in addition to make it possible for 
him to specialize in any department in which major courses are offered. 

Location and Equipment. — The agricultural college is located in the 
town of Amherst. The grounds comprise more than 500 acres, lying about 
a mile north of the village center. The equipment of the college, both in 
buildings and facilities for instruction, is excellent. Amherst is about 98 
miles from Boston, and may be reached over the Central Massachusetts 
division of the Boston & Maine Railroad, or by way of the Central Vermont 
Railroad. Electric car lines connect Amherst with Northampton, Holyoke 
and Springfield. 



1913.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 



The Massachusetts Agricultural Experiment 

Station. 



Massachusetts provided for the establishment of an agricultural experi- 
ment station in 1882. This station, though on the college grounds and sup- 
ported by the State, was then without organic connection with the college. 
Under an act of Congress, passed in 1887, an agricultural experiment station 
was established as a department of the college. It was supported by the 
general government. For a time, therefore, Massachusetts had two ex- 
periment stations at the college. In 1894 these were combined, and the 
station reorganized as a department of the college. It is now supported 
by funds from both the State and the general government. In 1906 the 
general government largely increased its support of experiment stations, 
on condition, however, that the money thus provided should be used only 
for research. The station now receives about one-third of its support from 
the State. 

The station is under the direct supervision of the Board of Trustees. The 
chief officer is the director, who is responsible to the president and to the 
committee of the Board. The station is organized into a number of depart- 
ments, all co-operating toward the betterment of agriculture. In most cases 
the heads of the station departments are heads of corresponding departments 
in the college. The work of the station takes three directions; namely, con- 
trol work, experimentation and investigation. The station publishes numer- 
ous bulletins and two annual reports, one scientific, the other for practical 
farmers and for general distribution. These publications, conveying in- 
formation as to results of experiments, are free, and circulate extensively, 
the mailing list containing some 20,000 addresses. 



10 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [Jan. 



The Corporation. 



Membees of the Corporation. 

term expires 

William H. Bowker of Concord, 1913 

George H. Ellis of West Newton 1913 

Charles E. Ward of Buckland 1914 

Elmer D. Howe of Marlborough, . . . . . . . . 1914 

Nathaniel I. Bowditch of Framingham, ....... 1915 

William Wheeler of Concord, 1915 

Arthur G. Pollard of Lowell, ........ 1916 

Charles A. Gleason of New Braintree, . . . . . . . 1916 

Frank Gereett of Greenfield, . . . . . . . . . 1917 

Harold L. Frost of Arlington, 1917 

Charles H. Preston of Danvers, ........ 1918 

Frank A. Hosmer of Amherst, . . . . . . . . - 1918 

Davis R. Dewey of Cambridge, ........' 1919 

M. Fayette Dickinson of Brookline, ....... 1919 

Members Ex Officio. 

His Excellency Governor Eugene N. Foss, President of the Corporation. 

Kenyon L. Butterfield, President of the College. 

David Snedden, State Commissioner of Education. 

J. Lewis Ellsworth, Secretary of the State Board of Agriculture. 

Officers of the Corporation. 

His Excellency Governor Eugene N. Foss of Boston, President. 
Charles A. Gleason of New Braintree, Vice-President. 
J. Lewis Ellsworth of Worcester, Secretary. 
Fred C. Kenney of Amherst, Treasurer. 
Charles A. Gleason of New Braintree, Auditor. 

Standing Committees of the Corporation. 1 
Committee on Finance. 



Charles A. Gleason, Chairman. 
George H. Ellis. 
Nathaniel I. Bowditch. 



Arthur G. Pollard. 
Charles E. Ward. 
Frank A. Hosmer. 



Committee on Course of Study and Faculty. 



William Wheeler, Chairman. 
William H. Bowker. 
M. Fayette Dickinson. 



David Snedden. 
Elmer D. Howe. 
Davis R. Dewey. 



Frank A. Hosmer. 



1 The president of the college is ex officio member and secretary of standing com- 
mittees. 



1913.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 11 



Committee on Farm. 
Nathaniel I. Bowditch, Chairman. I Charles A. Gleason. 

Frank Gerrett. ' George H. Ellis. 

Committee on Horticulture. 
J. Lewis Ellsworth, Chairman. I Elmer D. Howe. 

Davis R. Dewey. ' Harold L. Frost. 

Committee on Experiment Department. 1 
Charles H. Preston, Chairman. I Arthur G. Pollard. 

J. Lewis Ellsworth. ' Charles E. Ward. 

Harold L. Frost. 

Committee on Buildings and Arrangement of Grounds. 
William H. Bowker, Chairman. I Frank Gerrett. 

William Wheeler. ' M. Fayette Dickinson. 

Charles H. Preston. 

Examining Committee of Overseers from the State Board of Agriculture. 
John Bursley of West Barnstable. 
Frank P. Newkirk of Easthampton. 
William E. Patrick of Warren. 
John J. Erwin of Wayland. 
K. Henry Race of North Egremont. 

1 The director of the experiment station is a member of the committee on experi- 
ment department, without vote. 



12 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [Jan. 



Officers of the Institution. 



[The names of the faculty are arranged in groups according to rank. Within 
these groups, the order depends upon seniority of service in the college, not upon 
seniority of appointment to the position now held.] 

THE FACULTY. 
Kenyon L. Buttereield, A.M., LL.D., .... President's House. 

President of the College, and Head of Division of Rural Social Science. 

George F. Mills, A.M., 46 Amity Street. 

Dean of the College and Professor of Languages and Literature. 
Charles H. Fernald, Ph.D., . . ..... 3 Hallock S'treet. 

Honorary Direeior of the Graduate School. 
William P. Brooks, 1 Ph.D., ....... - - 

Director of the Experiment Station and Lecturer on Soil Fertility. 
William D. Hurd, M.Agr., . .... 82 Pleasant Street. 

Director of the Extension Service. 
Charles E. Marshall, Ph.D., . . ..... Sunset Avenue. 

Director of Graduate School and Professor of Microhiology. 
Frank A. Wattgh, M.Sc, .... Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Head of Division of Horticulture and Professor of Landscape Gardening. 
James A. Foord, M.Sc, ... .... 56 Lincoln Avenue. 

Administration. 

Mount Pleasant. 

Economics and Sociology. 

47 Lincoln Avenue. 



. 14 Maple Avenue. 

42 Lincoln Avenue, 
of Science. 

Mount Pleasant. 

130 Pleasant Street. 



Head of Division of Agriculture and Professor of Farm 
Robert J. S'prague, Ph.D., ..... 

Head of Division of the Humanities and Professor of 
Joseph B. Lindsey, Ph.D., ..... 

Goessmann Professor of Chemistry. 
Charles Wellington, Ph.D., ..... 

Professor of Chemistry. 
James B. Paige, B.Sc, D.V.S., : ... 

Professor of Veterinary Science, Chairman of Division 
George E. Stone, Ph.D., ... .... 

Professor of Botany. 
Philip B. Hasbrouck, B.Sc, ..... 

Professor of Physics and Registrar of the College. 
John E. Ostrander, A.M., C.E., . ... 44 North Prospect Street. 

Professor of Mathematics and Civil Engineering. 
Henry T. Fernald, Ph.D., . . ..... 44 Amity Street. 

Professor of Entomology. 
George C. Martin, C.E., Captain 18th U. S. Infantry, 35 North Prospect Street. 

Professor of Military Science and Tactics. 
Edward A. White, B.S Mount Pleasant. 

Professor of Floriculture. 
William R. Hart, A.M .... 97 Pleasant Street. 

Professor of Agricultural Education. 
Fred C. Sears, M.Sc Mount Pleasant. 

Professor of Pomology. 
Fred C. Kenney ■. Mount Pleasant. 

Treasurer of the College. 

1 On leave of absence. 



1913. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 



13 



Edward M. Lewis, A.M 34 Amity Street. 

Associate Dean and Professor of Literature. 
"William D. Clark, M.F., ..... 

Professor of Forestry. 
Sidney B. Haskell, B.Sc, . . .... 5 Fearing Street. 

Associate Professor of Agronomy. 
Robert W. Neal, A.M., ..... 

Associate Professor of English. 
Clarence E. Gordon, Ph.D., .... 

Associate Professor of Zoology and Geology. 
Alexander E. Cance, Ph.D., .... 

Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics. 
Joseph S. Chamberlain, Ph.D., 

Associate Professor of Organic and Agricultural Chemistry. 
William P. B. Lockwood, B.Sc.Agr., . . . .5 East Pleasant Street. 

Associate Professor of Dairying. 
Elmer K. Eyerly, A.M., ... ... 

Associate Professor of Rural Sociology. 
John A. McLean, A.B., B.Sc.Agr., .... 

Associate Professor of Animal Husbandry. 
John C. Graham, B.Sc.Agr., . . ... 

Associate Professor of Poultry Husbandry. 
Guy C. Crampton, Ph.D., ... ... 

Associate Professor of Entomology. 
Charles A. Peters, Ph.D., ..... 

Associate Professor of Inorganic and Soil Chemistry. 
A. Vincent Osmun, M.Sc, . ... 

Assistant Professor of Botany. 
Edgar L. Ashley, A.M., ... ... 

Assistant Professor of German. 
Anderson A. Mackimmie, A.B., ..... 

Assistant Professor of French. 
Burton N. Gates, Ph.D., ... ... 

Assistant Professor of Beekeeping. 
Curry S. Hicks, B.Sc . . . . 8 Allen Street. 

Assistant Professor of Physical Education and Hygiene. 
Frederick L. Yeaw, B.Sc, . . ..... 17 Fearing Street. 

Assistant Professor of Market Gardening. 
George S. Gage, Ph.D., 27 Sunset Avenue. 

Assistant Professor of Animal Pathology. 
Ernest Anderson, Ph.D., ... ..... 5 Nutting Avenue. 

Assistant Professor of General and Physical Chemistry. 
Henry E. Smith, M.A., Nutting Avenue. 

Assistant Professor of English. 
George N. Holcomb, A.B., S.T.B., ..... South Pleasant Street. 

Lecturer in History. 
Frank W. Rane, M.F., Boston. 

Lecturer in Forestry. 
Charles R. Green, B.Agr., . ..... Mount Pleasant. 

Librarian. 
C. Robert Duncan, B.Sc, ... ... 31 North Prospect Street. 

Instructor in Mathematics. 
Arthur K. Harrison, 8 Allen Street. 

Instructor in Landscape Gardening. 
Chester A. Butman, B.Sc, . 15 Spring Street. 

Instructor in Physics. 
Willard A. Wattles, A.M., . Mount Pleasant. 

Instructor in English. 
William L. Harmount, A.B 86 Pleasant Street. 

Instructor in French. 
Elvin L. Quaipe, B.Sc.Agr., . 9 Fearing Street. 

Instructor in Animal Husbandry. 



25 North Prospect Street. 



7 Woodside Avenue. 



Nutting Avenue. 
9 Fearing Street. 



Mount Pleasant. 



50 Amity Street. 



Lincoln Block. 



North Amherst. 



86 Pleasant Street. 



Sunset Avenue. 



North Amherst. 



Prospect House. 
Nutting Avenue. 



42 Lincoln Avenue. 



14 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [Jan. 

William L. Machmee, A.M., . ..... Kendrick Place. 

Instructor in Mathematics. 
Arthur N. Julian, B.A., ....... 50 Pleasant Street. 

Instructor in German. 
"Walter W. Chenoweth, M.Sc, . . ..... North Amherst. 

Instructor in Pomology. 
Walter E. Prince, B.A., ... ..... 13 Spring Street. 

Instructor in English and Public Speaking. 
Abbott A. Brown, B.Sc.Agr., . . ..... North Amherst. 

Instructor in Poultry Husbandry. 
Elmer M. McDonald, B.Sc, . . ..... 15 Fearing Street. 

Instructor in Agronomy. 
Samuel Coons, 56 Pleasant Street. 

Buttermaker. 
Helena T. Goessmann, Ph.M., . ..... 44 Amity Street. 

Assistant in English. 
Samuel R. Parsons, B.Sc, . 77 Pleasant Street. 

Assistant in Mathematics and in Military Science. 
Frederick A. McLaughlin, B.Sc, Clark Hall. 

Assistant in Botany. 
William J. Fitzmaurice, ........ - - 

Assistant in Physical Education. 
Robert H. Bogue, B.Sc 17 Phillips Street. 

Assistant in Chemistry. 

• 
Graduate Assistants. 

Irving W. Davis, B.Sc, 96 Pleasant Street. 

Assistant in Beekeeping. 
•G. Scott Fowler, B.Sc, . . 15 Phillips Street. 

Assistant in Chemistry. 
Rupert G. Gates, B.Sc, 120 Pleasant Street. 

Assistant in Chemistry. 
James F. Martin, B.Sc, ... .... 19 South East Street. 

Assistant in Entomology. 
Harry A. Noyes, B.Sc .... Chemistry Laboratory. 

Assistant in Chemistry. 
Ralph R. Parker, B.Sc, 13 Fearing Street. 

Assistant in Zoology and Geology. 
Raymond G. Smith, B.Sc 5Yz East Pleasant Street. 

Assistant in Botany. > 

Other College Officers. 
Edwin H. Forristall, M.S'c Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Farm Superintendent. 
Ralph J. Watts, B.Sc, Nutting Avenue. 

Secretary to the President. 
Harold A. Crane 1 Woodside Avenue. 

Cashier. 
Newton Wallace 6 Phillips Street. 

Electrician. 
Percy C. Schroyer 120 Pleasant Street. 

Assistant Engineer. 
Clarence A. Jewett, . . . . . . 112 Pleasant Street. 

Superintendent of Buildings. 
James Whiting, Hallock Street. 

Foreman, Department of Floriculture. 
William Chesley, Draper Hall. 

Steward, Dining Hall. 
John J. Lee, Sergeant, 9 Phillips Street. 

Assistant to the Military Detail. 
Miss Mary E. Caldwell, Draper Hall. 

Bookkeeper. 



1913. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 



15 



Miss Hbneietta Webster, . 

Clerk, Treasurer's Office. 
Miss Dorothy Mudge, 

Clerk, Treasurer's Office. 
Miss Stella H. Webb, 

Correspondence Clerk, President's Office 
Miss Lillian M. Gelinas, . 

Clerk, President's Office. 
Miss Alice Gilbert, . . . 

Stenographer, Division of Agriculture. 
Miss Luliona N. Barker, . 

Stenographer, Division of Agriculture. 
Miss Georgia A. King, 

Clerk, Registrar's Office. 
Miss Helen V. Gaskill, . 

Stenographer, Division of Floriculture. 
Miss Lina Fisher, . 

Stenographer, Department of Chemistry 
Miss Gladys E. Russell, . 

Stenographer, Division of Horticulture. 
Miss Virginia Noble, 

Clerk, Dean's Office. 
Miss Lorian P. Jefferson, 

Expert Secretary, Division of Rural Social Science 



THE EXTENSION SERVICE STAFF. 
Hurd, M.Agr., . .... 



. Draper Hall. 

Gaylord Street. 

. 9 Phillips Street. 

East Pleasant Street. 

Gaylord Street. 

9 Phillips Street. 

9 Phillips Street. 

105 Main Street. 

28 Pleasant Street. 

. Draper Hall. 

. Draper Hall. 

Kendrick Place. 



William D. 

Director. 
Earnest D. Waid, B.Agr., ... .... 

Assistant Director. 
Orion A. Morton, .... .... 

Extension Professor of Agricultural Education. 
Ezra L. Morgan, M.A., ... .... 

Community Field Agent. 
George F. E. Story, B.Sc.Agr., ..... 

Extension Instructor in Dairying and Animal Husbandry. 
Ralph W. Rees, B.Sc, ... .... 

Extension Instructor in Pomology. 
Charles H. White, B.Sc., . .... 

Field Agent, Worcester County. 
Herbert J. Baker, B.Sc, . . . 

Field Agent in Farm Management. 
Arthur T. Dailey, B.Sc, ... .... 

Supervisor of Correspondence Courses. 
Albert W. Doolittle, ... .... 

Field Agent, Barnstable County. 
Miss Mabel R. Case, .... .... 

Clerk to the Director. 
Miss Hannah Griffin, ... .... 

Clerk. 

THE EXPERIMENT STATION STAFF 
William P. Brooks, 1 Ph.D., 

Director. 
Fred W. Morse, Ph.D., 

Acting Director. 
Joseph B. Lindsey, Ph.D., 

Vice-Director. 
Fred C. Kenney, 

Treasurer. 
Charles R. Green, B.Agr., 

Librarian. 



82 Pleasant Street. 

. Amity Street. 

Mount Pleasant. 

. Amity Street. 

10 Allen Street. 

17 Fearing Street. 

North Uxbridge. 

9 Fearing Street. 

Sandwich. 

. Draper Hall. 

. Draper Hall. 



. 40 Pleasant Street. 
47 Lincoln Avenue. 

Mount Pleasant. 

Mount Pleasant. 



1 On leave of absence. 



16 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [Jan. 



Department of Plant and Animal Chemistry. 
Joseph B. Lindsey, Ph.D., . . .... 47 Lincoln Avenue. 

Chemist. 
Edward B. Holland, M.Sc, . ... 28 North Prospect Street. 

Associate Chemist, in charge of Research Division. 
Fred W. Morse, Ph.D., ... ..... 40 Pleasant Street. 

Research Chemist. 
Henri D. Haskins, B.Sc, ... ..... Amherst House. 

In charge of Fertilizer Division. 
Philip H. Smith, M.Sc 102 Main Street. 

In charge of Feed and Dairy Division. 
Lewell S. Walker, B.S'c, . 19 Phillips Street. 

Assistant. 
James C. Reed, B.Sc, Nutting Avenue. 

Assistant. 
Rudolph W. Ruprecht, B.Sc, . . . v . . . .31 Amity Street. 

Assistant. 
George R. Pierce, B.Sc, ... .... 53 Lincoln Avenue. 

Assistant. 
Carleton P. Jones, B.Sc, 30 North Prospect Street. 

Assistant. 
Joseph T. Howard North Amherst. 

Collector. 
Harry L. Allen, 89 Main Street. 

Assistant. 
James R. Alcock Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Assistant in Animal Nutrition. 
Carlos L. Beals, B.Sc, North Amherst. 

Assistant. 

Department of Agriculture. 
William P. Brooks, 1 Ph.D., . - - 

Agriculturist. 
Henry J. Franklin, Ph.D., . East Wareham. 

In charge of Cranberry Investigation. 
Edwin F. Gaskill, B.Sc, North Amherst. 

Assistant Agriculturist. 

Department of Horticulture. 
Frank A. Waugh, M.Sc, ..... Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Horticulturist. 
Fred C. Sears, M.Sc, Mount Pleasant. 

Pomologist. 
Jacob K. Shaw, Ph.D., 1 Allen Street. 

Assistant Horticulturist. 

Department of Botany and Vegetable Pathology. 
George E. Stone, Ph.D Mount Pleasant. 

Botanist and Vegetable Pathologist. 
George H. Chapman, M.Sc, . 13 Fearing Street. 

Assistant Botanist. 
Edward A. Larrabee, B.Sc, . . ...... Clark Hall. 

Assistant Botanist. 

Department of Entomology. 
Henry T. Fernald, Ph.D., . . ..... 44 Amity Street. 

Entomologist. 
Burton N. Gates, Ph.D., ... .... 42 Lincoln Avenue. 

Apiarist. 
Arthur I. Bourne, B.A., . . . . . . .12 East Pleasant Street. 

Assistant in Entomology. 

1 On leave of absence. 



1913.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 



17 



Department of Veterinary Science. 

James B. Paige, B.Sc, D.V.S. 

Veterinarian. 



42 Lincoln Avenue. 



Department op Meteorology 
John E. Ostrander, A.M., C.E., 

Meteorologist. 
Harris W. Angier, .... 

Observer. 



Other Officers of the 
Benjamin G. Southwick, B.Sc, 

Secretary to the Director. 
Mrs. Lucia G. Church, 

Stenographer, Director's Office. 
Miss P. Ethel Felton, 

Stenographer, Department of Plant and Animal Chemistry. 
Miss Bridie O'Donnell, . 

Stenographer, Department of Entomology 
Miss Alice M. Howard, 

Stenographer, Department of Plant and Animal Chemistry. 
Miss Jessie V. Crocker, . 

Stenographer, Department of Botany 
Miss Grace E. Gallond, . 

Stenographer, Director's Office. 
Miss Mary R. Kingsbury, . 

Stenographer, Department of Poultry Husbandry 



35 North Prospect Street. 
Massachusetts Agricultural College. 



Experiment Station. 

. Massachusetts Agricultural College. 



4 Hallock Street. 

9 Phillips Street. 

,. Hadley. 

North Amherst. 

Sunderland. 

28 Pleasant Street. 

97 Pleasant Street. 



18 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [Jan. 



Standing Committees oe the Faculty. 1 



1912-13. 



Catalogue and Other Publications. 
Associate Professor Neal. 

Associate Professor Eyerly. 
Associate Professor Cance. 

Commencement. 
Professor Paige. 

Captain Martin. 

Professor White. 

Mr. Kenney. 

Mr. Duncan. 

Mr. Philip H. Smith. 2 

Course of Study. 
Professor Hart. 

Professor Waugh. 

Professor Foord. 

Professor Ostrander. 

Professor Sprague. 

Associate Professor Chamberlain. 

Discipline; (Advisory). 
Professor Mills. 

Professor Hasbrouck. 

Captain Martin. 

Professor Lewis. 

Associate Professor Gordon. 

Assistant Professor Mackimmie. 

Employment. 
Professor Sears. 
Mr. Kenney. 
Associate Professor Haskell. 

Entrance Examinations and Admission. 
Professor Hasbrouck. 

Associate Professor Graham. 

Assistant Professor Osmun. 

Assistant Professor Ashley. 

Mr. Machmer. 

Mr. Wattles. 



1 The president of the college is ex officio member of each standing committee. 

2 Not a member of the faculty. 



1913.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 19 



Graduate School. 
Director Marshall. 

Professor Lindsey. 
Professor Paige. 
Professor Stone. 
Professor Fernald. 
Professor Sears. 
Associate Professor Gordon. 

Library. 

Professor Stone. 

Professor Wellington. 
Professor Marshall. 
Associate Professor Cance. 

Physical Education and Athletics. 
Assistant Professor Hicks. 
Director Hurd. 
Professor Lewis. 
Assistant Professor Yeaw. 

Schedule. 
Associate Professor Lockwood. 
Associate Professor Neal. 
Associate Professor Peters. 

Scholarship. 
Associate Professor Gordon. 
Professor Mills. 
Professor Hasbrouck. 
Professor Lewis. 
Assistant Professor Mackimmie. 

Student Life. 
Director Hurd. 

Professor Lewis. 

Associate Professor Chamberlain. 
Associate Professor McLean. 
Associate Professor Haskell. 
Assistant Professor Mackimmie. 
Assistant Professor Hicks. 

Unclassified Students. 
Professor White. 

Associate Professor Lockwood. 
Associate Professor Peters. 



The College. 



Admission. 



A. Application foe Admission. 

Correspondence about admission should be addressed to the registrar. 

Every applicant for admission to the college must be at least sixteen years 
old, and must present to the registrar proper testimonials of good character. 
Such testimonials, whenever possible, should come from the principal of the 
school at which the applicant has prepared for college. Candidates who 
desire to present themselves for examination in any subjects must make 
application to the college for such privilege on or before June 1 of the year 
in which examination is desired. Blanks for such application may be ob- 
tained by addressing the registrar of the college. All entrance credentials 
must be in the hands of the registrar before the applicant can matriculate. 

B. Modes of Admission. 

Students are admitted to the freshman class either upon certificate or upon 
examination. No diploma from a secondary school will be considered. 

Certificates. — The entrance requirements may be met by certification in 
any of the following ways: — 

1. By presenting certificate from a school approved for such privilege by 
this college. 

2. By presenting certificate from any school approved by the college en- 
trance examination boards. 

3. By presenting the customary credentials from the Board of Begents of 
the State of New York for any of the subjects of the entrance requirements. 

Certificates must present not less than seven of the necessary fourteen 
credits in all. Those subjects lacking on certificate (except for the permitted 
number of conditions) must be made up at the time of the examinations for 
admission. 

Blank forms for certification — sent to principals or school superintendents 
only — may be obtained on application to the registrar of the college. 

Examinations. — The examination in each subject may be oral or written, 
or both. The standard required for passing an examination for admission 
is 65 per cent. Conditions to the amount of two units will be allowed. 1 

1 Entrance with Condition in English. — Under the rule permitting entrance con- 
ditions of not more than two units of the preparatory subjects applicants may be 
admitted, upon examination, with a condition in English, provided that they show, 
upon examination, satisfactory preparation in work entitling them to a ranking of 
60 or higher. 

Students so admitted, must, to remove the condition, pass an examination covering 
the regular 3-units requirement. 



24 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [Jan. 

Places of Examination. — Examinations for admission to the college are 
held as follows: — 

In June of each year: in Amherst, in the building of the Department of 
Physics, Massachusetts Agricultural College; in Boston, in the College of 
Liberal Arts of Boston University, Boylston Street, corner of Exeter; in 
Worcester, in Horticultural Hall. 

In September, examinations will be held in Amherst only. 

Schedule for Entrance Examinations, June 19-21, inclusive, 1913. — The 
examinations in June will follow this schedule: — 







First Day. 


7.45 A.M. 


Registration. 1 




8 A.M. 


Plane geometry. 




10 A.M. 


Chemistry. 




11.30 A.M. 


Botany. 




2 P.M. 


Algebra. 




3.30 P.M. 


Physics. 


Second Day. 


8 A.M. 


Required English. 




11 A.M. 


Solid geometry. 




2 P.M. 


History, required and 


elective. 



Third Day. 
8 A.M. French, German, required and elective. 
1 p.m. Latin A and B and all one-half electives, except those already noted. 

Schedule for Entrance Examinations in September, — In September, 1913, 
the examinations will be given September 3-6, inclusive, and will follow the 
order indicated below: — 



1 P.M. Registration. 
1.15-5 p.m. Greek A and B. 

8 A.M. Plane geometry. 

10 A.M. Chemistry. 

11.30 a.m. Botany. 

2 P.M. Algebra. 
3.30 P.M. Physics. 

4.30 P.M. Elective English. 



First Day. 
Second Day. 



Third Day. 



8 A.M. Required English. 
11 A.m. Solid geometry, agriculture. 
2 P.M. History, required and elective. 

Fourth Day. 
8 A.M. French, German, required and elective. 

1 p.m. Latin A and B and all one-half credit electives, except those already 
noted. 

C. Eequirements for Admission. 
The requirements for admission are based on the completion of a four- 
years course in a high school or its equivalent, and are stated in terms of 
units. The term unit means the equivalent of four or five recitations a week 

1 Candidates who have no examination at the time set for registration may reg- 
ister at the time of their first examination should they so desire. 



1913.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 25 

for a school year. Neither more nor less credit will be given in any subject 
than is indicated in the table below. Fourteen units must be offered for 
admission, of which eight and one-half are required and five and one-half 
are elective. 

(a) The following eight and one-half units are required: — 

Language. 

English, .....••••■• 3 
French, or German, ......... 2 

History and Civics. 

History (elective), ......... 1 

(a) Ancient history. 

(6) Medieval and modern history. 

(c) English history. 

(d) General history. 

(e) United States history and civics. 

Mathematics. 
Algebra, through progressions, . . . . . . . IVz 

Plane geometry, . . . . . . . . 1 . 

(&) In addition to the requirements under (a), five and one-half units 
must be offered from the following-named elective subjects. Not more than 
four of those subjects in which the credit sought is one-half unit will be 
accepted. 

Language. 
English in addition to requirements, .... 
French in addition to requirements, .... 
German in addition to requirements, .... 



Greek, 
Latin, 









1 




2 


or 


l 1 




2 


or 


l 1 




2 


or 


3 




2 


or 


3 


1, 


2, 


or 


3 



History. 
In addition to requirements, ..... 

Mathematics, and Other Sciences. 
Solid geometry, ......... y 2 

Trigonometry, ......... y 2 

Chemistry, ......... 1 

Physiography, ......... y 2 

Physiology, y 2 

Agriculture, 2 . . . . . . . . , % or 1 

Botany, 2 . . . . . . . . . y 2 or 1 

Geology, 2 y 2 

Physics, 2 .......... 1 

Zoology, 2 y 2 

Commercial geography, 3 ....... y 2 

Drawing, 3 ........... y 2 

Manual training, 3 . . . . . . . y 2 or 1 

1 If but one elective unit be offered, it must be in the same language as that 
offered to meet the two-year language requirement. 

2 Note-book required as part of preparation will be credited as part of the examina- 
tion. 

3 Certification necessary in these subjects; no examinations given. 



26 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [Jan. 

PRESENTATION OF NOTE-BOOKS. — The keeping of a note-book is required as 
part of the preparation in those subjects indicated (see note 2, page 25). 

Candidates presenting themselves for examination in such subjects must present 
at the same time the required note-book, properly certified by the principal. Can- 
didates presenting such subjects on certificate should not present note-books; but 
their certificate must state that note-books have been satisfactorily completed. 



D. Statement op Preparation required for Admission. 

In some cases the requirements of the College Entrance Examination Board are 
here mentioned. A pamphlet containing detailed explanation of these require- 
ments can be had of the Board for 10 cents. Address substation 84, New York City. 

Agriculture. 1 — Owing to the wide divergence of the methods of teaching 
agriculture in the public schools, the student will be required to bring a 
statement from the principal of the amount and kinds of work accomplished 
and of the text-books used. The examination will be based somewhat upon 
this information ; but it will call for not less than one-half year of creditable 
work of high school grade. The examination in agriculture will be given in 
September only. 

Botany. — For one unit of credit in botany, the work outlined in the 
statement of requirements issued by the College Entrance Examination 
Board, or its equivalent, will be accepted. This work should occupy one 
school year and include laboratory and supplementary text-book study. For 
one-half unit of credit, work that covers the same ground but occupies half 
the time required for a full unit of credit will be accepted. These require- 
ments are met by such texts as Steven's " Introduction to Botany " and 
Bergen and Davis's " Principles of Botany." A note-book containing neat, 
accurate drawings and descriptive records forms part of the requirement for 
either the half -unit or the one-unit credit; and this note-book must be 
presented by all applicants for admission upon examination in this subject. 
The careful preparation of an herbarium is recommended to all prospective 
students of this college, although the herbarium is not required. 

Chemistry. — The entrance examination in chemistry will cover the work 
outlined by the College Entrance Examination Board as preparatory for 
college entrance. In general, this consists of a year of high school chemistry 
from such text-books as Newell's "Descriptive Chemistry" or Kemsen's 
" Elements of Chemistry," with laboratory work on the general properties 
of the common elements, some of the experiments being quantitative. The 
keeping of a note-book is required. 

Mathematics. — (a) Bequired. — Algebra: The four fundamental opera- 
tions for rational algebraic expressions; factoring, determination of highest 
common factor and lowest common multiple by factoring ; fractions, including 
complex fractions ; ratio and proportion ; linear equations, both numerical and 
literal, containing one or more unknown quantities; problems depending on 
linear equations; radicals, including the extraction of the square root of 
polynomials and numbers; exponents, including the fractional and negative; 
quadratic equations, both numerical and literal; simple cases of equations 
with one or more unknown quantities that can be solved by the methods of 
linear or quadratic equations; problems depending upon quadratic equations; 



1 Examination given in September only. 



1913.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 27 

the binomial theorem for positive integral exponents, the formulas for the 
nth term and the sum of the terms of arithmetic and geometric progressions, 
with applications. 

Plane Geometry: The usual theorems and constructions of good text-books, 
including the general properties of plane rectilinear figures; the circle and 
the measurement of angles; similar polygons; areas; regular polygons and 
the measurement of the circle; the solution of numerous original exercises, 
including loci problems; applications to the mensuration of lines and plane 
surfaces. 

(6) Elective. — Solid Geometry: The usual theorems and constructions of 
good text-books, including the relations of planes and lines in space; the 
properties and measurement of prisms, pyramids, cylinders and cones; the 
sphere and spherical triangle; the solution of numerous original exercises, 
including loci problems; applications to the mensuration of surfaces and 
solids. 

Plane Trigonometry : A knowledge of the definitions and relations of trig- 
onometric functions and of circular measurements and angles; proofs of the 
principal formulas and the application of these formulas to the transforma- 
tion of the trigonometric functions; solution of trigonometric equations, the 
theory and use of logarithms, and the solution of right and oblique triangles. 

Physics. — To satisfy the entrance requirement in physics, the equivalent 
of at least one unit of work is required. This work should consist of both 
class-room work and laboratory practice. The work covered in the class 
room should be equal to that outlined in Hall & Bergen's " Text-book of 
Physics; " the laboratory work should represent at least thirty- five experi- 
ments involving careful measurements, with accurate recording of each in 
laboratory note-book. This note-book, certified by the instructor in the sub- 
ject, must be submitted by each candidate presenting himself for examina- 
tion in physics; credit for passing the subject will be given on laboratory 
notes and on the examination paper submitted. Candidates entering on cer- 
tificate will not be required to present note-books, but the principal's certifi- 
cation must cover laboratory as well as class-room work. 

Physiology. — Hough & Sedgwick's " The Human Mechanism ; " Martin's 
" The Human Body : Briefer Course." 

Zoology, Physiography, Geology. — The following suggestions are made 
concerning preparation for admission in the subjects named above: — 

For physiography, Davis's "Elementary Physical Geography;" Gilbert & 
Brigham's " Introduction to Physical Geography." For zoology, text-books 
entitled " Animals " or " Animal Studies," by Jordan, Kellogg and Heath ; 
Linville & Kelley's " A Text-book in General Zoology." For geology, A. P. 
Brigham's " A Text -book of Geology " or Tarr's " Elementary Geology." 

Applicants for examination in zoology are required to present certified 
laboratory note-books; applicants for examination in the other subjects are 
advised to present note-books, if laboratory work has been done. Good 
note-books may be given credit for entrance. Examination in these subjects 
will be general, in recognition of the different methods of conducting 
courses; but students will be examined on the basis of the most thorough 
secondary school courses. 

History. — The required unit must be offered in either ancient history, 
medieval and modern history, English history, general history, or United 



28 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [Jan. 

States history and civics. Either one, two or three elective units in any 
of the historical subjects here named may be offered, provided that such 
units may not be offered in the same subject in which the required unit has 
been offered. 

Preparation in history will be satisfactory if made in accordance with 
the recommendations of the committee of seven of the American Historical 
Association, as outlined by the College Entrance Examination Board. The 
examination will require comparisons and the use of judgment by the candi- 
date rather than the mere use of memory, and it will presuppose the use of 
good text-books, collateral reading and practice in written work. Geographi- 
cal knowledge may be tested by requiring the location of places and move- 
ments on an outline map. 

To indicate in a general way the character of the text-book work expected, 
the texts of the following authors are suggested: Botsford, Morey or Myers, 
in ancient history (to 814 A.D.) ; Adams, West or Myers, in medieval his- 
tory; Montgomery, Larned or Cheyney, in English history; Myers or Fisher, 
in general history; Piske, together with MacLaughlin or Montgomery, in 
United States history and civics. 

English. — For 1913, 1914: — 

English Grammar and Composition. — Command of correct and clear 
English (spoken or written) requires instruction in grammar and composi- 
tion. English grammar should ordinarily be reviewed in the secondary 
school; and correct spelling and grammatical accuracy should be rigorously 
exacted in connection with all written work during the four years. The 
principles of English composition governing punctuation, the use of words, 
paragraphs, and the different kinds of whole composition, including letter 
writing, should be thoroughly mastered; and practice in composition, oral 
as well as written, should extend throughout the secondary school period. 
Written exercises may well comprise narration, description and easy exposi- 
tion and argument based upon simple outlines. It is advisable that subjects 
for this work be taken from the student's personal experience, general knowl- 
edge and studies other than English, as well as from his reading in literature. 
Finally, special instruction in language and composition should be accom- 
panied by concerted effort of teachers in all branches to cultivate in the 
student the habit of using good English in his recitations and various exer- 
cises, whether oral or written. 

Literature. — Ability to read with accuracy, intelligence and appreciation 
is sought through study of books included in two lists, headed respectively 
" Eeading " and " Study," from which may be framed a progressive course 
in literature covering four years. In connection with both lists the student 
should be trained in reading aloud, and encouraged to commit to memory 
some of the more notable passages, both in verse and in prose. As an aid 
to literary appreciation, he is further advised to acquaint himself with the 
most important facts in the lives of the authors whose works he reads, and 
with their place in literary history. 

(a) Eeading: The aim of this course is to foster in the student the habit 
of intelligent reading, and to develop a taste for good literature by giving 
him a first-hand knowledge of some of its best specimens. He should read 
the books carefully, but his attention should not be so fixed upon details 
that he fails to appreciate the main purpose and charm of what he reads. 



1913.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. . 29 

With a view to large freedom of choice, the books provided for reading 
are arranged in the following groups, from which at least ten units (each 
unit being set off by semicolons) are to be selected, two from each 
group : — 

I. The " Old Testament," comprising at least the chief narrative episodes 
in Genesis, Exodus, Joshua, Judges, Samuel, Kings and Daniel, together 
with the books of Euth and Esther ; the " Odyssey," with the omission, if 
desired, of books I., II., III., IV., V., XV., XVI., XVII.; the "Iliad," with 
the omission if desired, of books XI., XIII., XIV., XV., XVII., XXI. ; Virgil's 
" JEneid." The " Odyssey," " Iliad " and " iEneid " should be read in English 
translations of recognized literary excellence. 

For any unit of this group a unit from any other group may be substi- 
tuted. 

II. Shakspere's " Merchant of Venice ; " " Midsummer Night's Dream ; " 
"As You Like It; " " Twelfth Night; " " Henry the Fifth; " " Julius Ceesar." 

III. Defoe's " Eobinson Crusoe," Part I.; Goldsmith's "Vicar of Wake- 
field ; " either Scott's " Ivanhoe " or " Quentin Durward ; " Hawthorne's 
" House of the Seven Gables ; " either Dickens's " David Copperfield " or " A 
Tale of Two Cities;" Thackeray's "Henry Esmond;" Mrs. Gaskell's 
" Cranf ord ; " George Eliot's " Silas Marner ; " Stevenson's " Treasure 
Island." 

IV. Bunyan's " Pilgrim's Progress," Part I. ; " The Sir Eoger de Coverley 
Papers" in "The Spectator;" Franklin's "Autobiography" (condensed); 
Irving's " Sketch Book," Maeaulay's " Essays on Lord Clive " and " Warren 
Hastings ; " Thackeray's " English Humourists ; " selections from Lincoln, 
including at least the two inaugurals, the speeches in Independence Hall 
and at Gettysburg, the last public address and the letter to Horace Greeley, 
along with a brief memoir or estimate ; Parkman's " Oregon Trail ; " either 
Thoreau's " Walden," or Huxley's "Autobiography" and selections from 
"Lay Sermons," including the addresses on "Improving Natural Knowl- 
edge;" "A Liberal Education" and "A Piece of Chalk;" Stevenson's 
" Inland Voyage " and " Travels with a Donkey." 

V. Palgrave's "Golden Treasury" (first series), books II. and III., with 
especial attention to Dryden, Collins, Gray, Cowper and Burns; Gray's 
" Elegy in a Country Churchyard " and Goldsmith's " Deserted Village ; " 
Coleridge's " Ancient Mariner " and Lowell's " Vision of Sir Launf al ; " 
Scott's "Lady of the Lake;" Byron's " Childe Harold," Canto IV., and 
"Prisoner of Chillon; " Palgrave's "Golden Treasury" (first series), book 
IV., with especial attention to Wordsworth, Keats and Shelley; Poe's 
" Eaven," Longfellow's " Courtship of Miles Standish," and Whittier's " Snow 
Bound ; " Maeaulay's " Lays of Ancient Eome " and Arnold's " Sohrab and 
Eustum ; " Tennyson's " Gareth and Lynette," " Lancelot and Elaine " and 
" The Passing of Arthur ; " Browning's " Cavalier Tunes," " The Lost 
Leader," " How They Brought the Good News from Ghent to Aix," " Home 
Thoughts from Abroad," " Home Thoughts from the Sea," " Incident of the 
French Camp," " Herve Eiel," " Pheidippides," " My Last Duchess," " Up at 
a Villa — Down in the City." 

(6) Study: This part of the requirement is intended as a natural and 
logical continuation of the student's earlier reading, with greater stress 
laid upon form and style, the exact meaning of words and phrases, and the 



30 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [Jan. 

understanding of allusions. For this close reading are provided a play, a 
group of poems, an oration and an essay, as follows: — 

Shakspere's " Macbeth ; " Milton's " L' Allegro," " II Penseroso " and 
" Comus ; " either Burke's " Speech on Conciliation with America," or both 
Washington's " Farewell Address " and Webster's " First Bunker Hill 
Oration ; " either Macaulay's " Life of Johnson," or Carlyle's " Essay on 
Burns." 

Examination. — However accurate in subject-matter, no paper will be 
deemed satisfactory if seriously defective in punctuation, spelling or other 
essentials of good usage. 

The examination will be divided into two parts, one of which may be 
taken as a preliminary, and the other as a final. 

The first part of the examination will be based upon ten units chosen, in 
accordance with the plan described earlier, from the lists headed reading; 
and it may include also questions upon grammar and the simpler principles 
of rhetoric, and short compositions upon topics drawn from the student's 
general knowledge or experience. On the books prescribed for reading, the 
form of the examination will usually be the writing of short paragraphs on 
several topics which the candidate may choose out of a considerable number. 
These topics will involve such knowledge and appreciation of plot, character- 
development and other qualities of style and treatment as may be fairly 
expected of boys and girls. In grammar and rhetoric, the candidate may 
be asked specific questions upon the practical essentials of these studies, such 
as the relation of the various parts of a sentence to one another, the con- 
struction of individual words in a sentence of reasonable difficulty, and those 
good usages of modern English which one should know in distinction from 
current errors. 

The second part of the examination will include composition and these 
books comprised in the list headed study. The test in composition will con- 
sist of one essay or more, developing a theme through several paragraphs; 
the subjects will be drawn from the books prescribed for study, from the 
candidate's other studies and from his personal knowledge and experiences 
quite apart from reading. For this purpose the examiner will provide several 
subjects from which the candidate may make his own selections. The test 
on the books prescribed for study will consist of questions upon their content, 
form and structure, and upon the meaning of such words, phrases and 
allusions as may be necessary to an understanding of the works and an ap- 
preciation of their salient qualities of style. General questions may also be 
asked concerning the lives of the authors, their other works, and the periods 
of literary history to which they belong. 

English, Elective. 1 — To secure a fourth entrance credit in English, the 
applicant should do (a) the full equivalent of three years' work (required 
English), and also (6) the full equivalent of a fourth year's work. Appli- 
cants not certified with a fourth entrance credit will be examined, provided 
that the applicant, on or before June 1, notify the Department of English 
of his intention to take the examination, and supply thereafter the informa- 
tion needed by the department to prepare the examination questions. The 
information blanks will be forwarded by the Department of English upon 
receipt of the notice. 

1 Examination given in September only. 



1913.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 31 

Subjects accepted. — The applicant may offer (a) any one of the subjects 
stated hereunder, or (&) any two of these subjects in combination, 
(a) History of American literature. 
(6) History of English literature (or lives of the great authors). 

(c) Classics other than those read to meet the three-credit requirement. 

(d) Advanced composition. 

(e) History of the English language. 
(/) Advanced high school grammar. 

Advanced Standing in College. — Whether advanced standing shall be 
given applicants entering with a fourth credit in English will be determined 
by consideration of each case individually. Much weight is given to the 
ability of the student to express himself correctly and clearly, to think 
clearly, and to grasp the meaning of printed language. A special examina- 
tion will be given in the opening week of college, notice of which will be 
posted on the English bulletin board, for freshmen who wish to apply for 
advanced standing. 

Presentation of Note-booTcs and Themes. — Applicants for examination, 
either for fourth-unit credit or for advanced standing, are advised to present 
the note-books, themes, etc!, prepared by them in the preparatory school, 
as an aid toward determining their proficiency. 

For 1915-19 inclusive:— ' 

The requirements for entrance to the Massachusetts Agricultural College 
continue to be those of the National Conference on Uniform Entrance Be- 
quirements in English (for detailed statement governing 1915-19, apply 
to the College Entrance Examination Board). 

Attention is called to two recommendations of the National Conference 
made in the official statement of requirements for 1915-19; namely: — 

1. That colleges so desiring may set an examination requiring no pre- 
scribed books, but testing the same general kind of preparation as that 
indicated in the standard requirements. 

2. That individual colleges take such steps as may be found necessary 
to ascertain whether candidates for entrance possess an adequate equipment 
in oral English. 

These recommendations agree with the policy of the agricultural col- 
lege, which will, as rapidly as seems expedient, proceed in accordance with 
them. Schools wishing to present candidates prepared in accordance with 
the intent of these recommendations will have the co-operation of the col- 
lege. The college understands this intent to be the development of the 
pupil's powers of thought, understanding and expression; the test to be 
not merely a test of memory, but even more a test of ability, to be shown 
by dealing with new problems calling for the application of his previously 
gained knowledge and skill. 

The list of books prescribed for 1915-19 here follows: — 

(A) Reading: "With a view to large freedom of choice, the books pro- 
vided for reading are arranged in the following groups, from each of which 
at least two selections are to be made, except as otherwise provided under 
Group I : — 

Group I. Classics in Translation. — The " Old Testament," comprising at 
least the chief narrative episodes in Genesis, Exodus, Joshua, Judges, 
Samuel, Kings and Daniel, together with the books of Euth and Esther; 



32 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [Jan. 

the " Odyssey," with the omission, if desired, of books I., II., III., IV., 
V., XV., XVI., XVII.; the " Iliad," with the omission, if desired, of 
books XI., XIII., XIV., XV., XVII., XXI.; the "^Eneid." The "Odyssey," 
" Iliad " and " iEneid " should be read in English translations of recognized 
literary excellency. 

For any selection from this group a selection from any other group may 
be substituted. 

Group II. Sliakspere. — "Midsummer Night's Dream;" "Merchant of 
Venice ; " " As You Like It ; " " Twelfth Night ; " " The Tempest ; " " Eomeo 
and Juliet;" "King John;" "Richard II.;" " Eichard in.;" "Henry 
V.;" "Coriolanus; " "Julius Caesar;" 1 "Macbeth;" 1 "Hamlet." 1 

Group III. Prose Fiction. — Malory's " Morte d' Arthur " (about 100 
pages); Bunyan's "Pilgrim's Progress," Part I.; Swift's " G-ulliver's 
Travels " (voyages to Lilliput and to Brobdingnag) ; Defoe's " Bobinson 
Crusoe," Part I. ; Goldsmith's " Vicar of Wakefield ; " Frances Burney's 
" Evelina ; " Scott's novels, any one, " Guy Mannering," " Ivanhoe," " Old 
Mortality," " Quentin Durward," " Rob Roy," or " The Talisman ; " Jane 
Austen's novels, any one ; Maria Edgeworth's " Castle Raekrent " or " The 
Absentee; " Dickens's novels, any one; Thackeray's novels, any one; George 
Eliot's novels, any one ; Mrs. Gaskell's " Cranf ord • " Kingsley's " Westward 
Ho! " or " Hereward the Wake; " Reade's " The Cloister and the Hearth; " 
Blaekmore's "Lorna Doone; " Hughes's "Tom Brown's School Days;" 
Stevensons " Treasure Island," " Kidnapped " or " Master of Ballantrae ; " 
Cooper's novels, any one; Poe's "Selected Tales; " Hawthorne's "The House 
of the Seven Gables," "Twice Told Tales" or "Mosses from an Old 
Manse ; " a collection of short stories by various standard writers. 

Group IV. Essays, Biography, etc. — Addison and Steele's " The Sir Roger 
de Coverley Papers " or selections from the " Tattler " and " Spectator " 
(about 200 pages) . selections from Boswell's " Life of Johnson " (about 
200 pages) ; Franklin's " Autobiography ; " Irving's selections from the 
"Sketch Book" (about 200 pages) or "Life of Goldsmith;" Southey's 
"Life of Nelson;" Lamb's selections from the "Essays of Elia" (about 
100 pages); Lockhart's selections from the "Life of Scott" (about 200 
pages) ; Thackeray's " Lectures on Swift, Addison, and Steele in the English 
Humorists;" Macaulay: any one of the following of Macaulay's essays: 
"Lord Clive," "Warren Hastings," "Milton," "Addison," "Goldsmith," 
"Frederic the Great," "Madame d'Arblay; " Trevelyan's selections from 
the " Life of Macaulay " (about 200 pages) ; Ruskin's " Sesame and Lilies " 
or "Selections" (about 150 pages) ; Dana's " Two Years before the Mast; " 
Lincoln's "Selections," including at least the two "Inaugurals," the 
"Speeches in Independence Hall and at Gettysburg," the "Last Public 
Address," the " Letter to Horace Greeley," together with a brief memoir or 
estimate of Lincoln; Parkman's " The Oregon Trail; " Thoreau's " Walden; " 
Lowell's " Selected Essays " (about 150 pages) ; Holmes's " The Autocrat of 
the Breakfast Table; " Stevenson's " An Inland Voyage" and " Travels with 
a Donkey; " Huxley's "Autobiography" and selections from "Lay Sermons," 
including the addresses on " Improving Natural Knowledge," " A Liberal 



1 If not chosen for study under B. 



1913.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 33 

Education " and " A Piece of Chalk ; " a collection of " Essays " by Bacon, 
Lamb ; De Quincey, Hazlitt, Emerson, and later writers; a collection of 
" Letters " by various standard writers. 

Group V. Poetry. — Palgrave's "Golden Treasury" (first series), books 
II. and III., with special attention to Dryden, Collins, Gray, Cowper and 
Burns; Palgrave's "Golden Treasury" (first series), Book IV., with special 
attention to Wordsworth, Keats and Shelley (if not chosen for study under 
B); Goldsmith's "The Traveller" and "The Deserted Village;" Pope's 
" The Bape of the Lock ; " a collection of English and Scottish ballads, 
as, for example, some " Bobin Hood " ballads, " The Battle of Otterburn," 
" King Estmere," " Young Beichan," " Bewick and Grahame," " Sir Patrick 
Spens," and a selection from later ballads ; Coleridge's " The Ancient 
Mariner," " Christabel " and " Kubla Khan ; " Byron's " Childe Harold," 
Canto III. or IV., and " The Prisoner of Chillon ; " Scott's " The Lady of 
the Lake" or "Marmion;" Macaulay's "The Lays of Ancient Borne," 
" The Battle of Naseby," " The Armada," " Ivry ; " Tennyson's " The 
Princess " or " Gareth and Lynette," " Lancelot and Elaine," and " The 
Passing of Arthur ; " Browning's " Cavalier Tunes," " The Lost Leader," 
" How They Brought the Good News from Ghent to Aix," " Home Thoughts 
from Abroad," " Home Thoughts from the Sea," " Incident of the French 
Camp," "Herve Biel," " Pheidippides," "My Last Duchess," "Up at a 
Villa — Down in the City," " The Italian in England," " The Patriot," " The 
Pied Piper," " De Gustibus," " Instans Tyrannus ; " Arnold's " Sohrab and 
Bustum " and " The Forsaken Merman ; " selections from American poetry, 
with special attention to Poe, Lowell, Longfellow and Whittier. 

(B) Study: This part of the requirement is intended as a natural and 
logical continuation of the student's earlier reading, with greater stress 
laid upon form and style, the exact meaning of words and phrases, and the 
understanding of allusions. The books provided for study are arranged in 
four groups, from each of which one selection is to be made. 

Group I. Drama. — Shakspere's " Julius Cfesar," " Macbeth," " Hamlet." 

Group II. Poetry. — Milton's " L' Allegro," " II Penseroso " and either 
" Comus " or " Lycidas ; " Tennyson's " The Coming of Arthur," " The 
Holy Grail " and " The Passing of Arthur ; " the selections from Words- 
worth, Keats and Shelley in Book IV. of Palgrave's " Golden Treasury " 
(first series). 

Group III. Oratory. — Burke's "Speech on Conciliation with America;" 
Macaulay's " Speech on Copyright " and Lincoln's " Speech at Cooper 
Union ; " Washington's " Farewell Address " and Webster's " First Bunker 
Hill Oration." 

Group IV. Essays. — Carlyle's " Essay on Burns," with a selection from 
Burns's " Poems ; " Macaulay's " Life of Johnson ; " Emerson's " Essay on 
Manners." 

French. — The necessary preparation for this examination is stated in 
the description of the two-year course in elementary French recommended 
by the Modern Language Association, contained in the definition of require- 
ments of the College Entrance Examination Board. 

Third and fourth year French (elective subjects for admission). — For a 
single credit unit in French as an elective subject for entrance, the work 



34 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [Jan. 

heretofore described by the College Entrance Examination Board, as " in- 
termediate " is expected. For two credit units, the work described as 
" intermediate " and " advanced " is expected. 

German. — The entrance requirements in German conform to those of the 
College Entrance Examination Board for elementary German (the standard 
two-year requirements). 

Third and fourth year German (elective subjects for admission). — For a 
single credit unit in German as an elective subject for entrance, when re- 
quired units have been offered in German, the work heretofore described 
by the College Entrance Examination Board as " intermediate " is expected. 
For two credit units, the work described as " intermediate " and " ad- 
vanced" is expected. 

Greek. 1 — Greek will receive credit as an elective requirement upon either 
examination or certification, as follows : — 

A. Two credit units will be allowed if satisfactory proficiency is shown 
(including grammar) in (a) the translation of a passage or passages taken 
from the first four books of Xenophon's "Anabasis," and (6) the transla- 
tion of passages of Attic prose at sight. 

B. Three credit units will be allowed if, in addition to the above, satis- 
factory proficiency, be shown in (a) the translation of a passage or passages 
from the first six books of Homer's "Iliad," and (6) translation of passages 
of Homer's " Iliad " at sight, with questions on the form and constructions 
of the passages. 

Latin. — Latin will receive credit as an elective requirement upon either 
examination or certification, as follows : — 

A. Two credit units will be allowed if satisfactory proficiency is shown 
(including grammar) in (a) the translation of a passage or passages taken 
from Caesar's "Gallic War," covering at least four books, and (&) the trans- 
lation of passages of Latin prose at sight. 

B. Three credit units will be allowed if, in addition to the above, satis- 
factory proficiency be shown in (a) the translation of a passage or passages 
selected from either books I. to VI. of Virgil's "iEneid," or six orations of 
Cicero, including those against Catiline; and (6) the translation into Latin 
prose of a passage of connected English narrative based on some portion of 
Cesar's " Gallic War," books I. to IV. 

Commercial Geography. — Preparation should be given in a course equiv- 
alent to that laid down in Adam's "Commercial Geography," Trotter's 
" Geography of Commerce," or a similar work. 

Drawing. — Applicants may offer either freehand or mechanical drawing, 
or both. They must be able to make an accurate freehand sketch, in either 
outline or light and shade, of the appearance of a group of geometric solids, 
and have a sufficient knowledge of perspective to enable them to draw cor- 
rectly a simple geometric model from memory ; or, if they present mechanical 
drawing, they must have considerable working familiarity with drawing in- 
struments, and be able to make an accurate inked working drawing, in 
orthographic projection, of some simple object. Emphasis is laid on facility 
in doing good freehand lettering. For a limitation of the work that may be 
presented see " Manual Training." 



1 Examination given in September only. 



1913.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 35 

Manual Training. — An entrance credit of one-half or one unit is allowed 
for manual training, on the presentation of a certificate from the principal 
of the school showing the scope and character of the applicant's work. The 
preparation may include mechanical drawing, working in wood, metals, 
leather, etc. When mechanical drawing is presented as a part of the work 
in manual training, no other credit for drawing will be allowed. No exam- 
ination is given in this subject; applicants must present certificates to secure 
credit. 

E. Admission to Advanced Standing. 
Candidates for admission to advanced standing, in addition to meeting 
the regular entrance requirements, must also pass examinations in those sub- 
jects already pursued by the class they desire to enter. To meet this require- 
ment, a student transferring to this college from another college or university 
of recognized standing must present the following credentials : — '■ 

1. A letter of honorable dismissal from the institution with which he has 
been connected. 

2. A statement or certificate of his entrance record. 

3. A statement from the proper officer showing a complete record of his 
work while in attendance. 

4. A marked catalogue showing the courses pursued. 

These credentials should be presented to the registrar. Applications will 
be judged wholly on their merits and the college may prescribe additional 
tests before accepting applicants or determining the standing to be granted 
them. 

F. Other Information about Entrance. 

1. The privileges of the college may be withdrawn from any student at any 
time if such action is deemed advisable. (It is immaterial whether the pupil 
has entered by certificate or by examination.) 

2. The examination in each subject may be either oral or written, or both. 
The standard required for passing an entrance examination is 65 per cent. 

3. Candidates must receive credit for twelve units out of the total number 
required for entrance, and will be conditioned in those subjects not passed. 
No candidate deficient in both algebra and plane geometry will be admitted. 

4. Examinations for the removal of entrance conditions will be held as 
follows: (1) First entrance condition examination, in the week following 
the Thanksgiving recess. (2) Second entrance condition examination, in the 
sixteenth week of the first semester. 

5. Credits for entrance requirements, whether gained by certificate or by 
examination, will hold good for one year. 

6. Examinations in part of the subjects required for entrance may be taken 
one year before entering college. 

7. Eor information concerning expenses, scholarships, etc., see " General 
Information." 

8. For information concerning admission to short courses see " Short 
Courses." 

9. All requests for information concerning admission of unclassified 
students should be addressed to Prof. E. A. White, chairman of committee 
on unclassified students. 



36 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [Jan. 



G. Unclassified Students. 

Students not candidates for a degree (unclassified students) are admitted 
under the following provisions: — 

1. No entrance examination is required, but applicants must bring certifi- 
cates showing that they have finished a four-years high school course or its 
equivalent, and furnish satisfactory testimonials as to moral character. 

2. No applicant under twenty-one years of age will be admitted as an un- 
classified student. 

3. Each unclassified student must take from the regular courses a minimum 
of twelve credit hours a week. 

•4. In order to be admitted to any course, an unclassified student must 
have had all prerequisite subjects for that course. 

5. Every unclassified student must do all the work of the courses elected, 
and take all examinations therein. In order to pass such courses he must 
attain a grade of at least 75 per cent. An unclassified student who passes 
in less than two-thirds of his work will be dropped from college. 

6. All unclassified students are subject to the supervision of a special 
committee. 

7. Any unclassified student may be dropped from college at any time 
if his presence in any class is undesirable or his work is unsatisfactory; and 
no unclassified student will be allowed to remain in college more than four 
semesters without the special permission of the faculty. 

8. Unclassified students are subject to the regulations applying to classified 
students. 

9. No student of this or any other institution who has not done efficient 
work therein shall be permitted to register as an unclassified student. 

10. No unclassified student shall be allowed to participate in any inter- 
collegiate contests. 



1913.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 37 



Courses oe Instruction. 



A. TABLE OP FEESHMAN AND SOPHOMOEE SUBJECTS. 

[The figures indicate the number of credit hours a week. For details, see the descrip- 
tions of courses.] 

Freshman Year. 
First Semester. 
[All work required.] 

Chemistry, .......... 3 

Algebra, . . . . . . . . . . 3 

Solid Geometry, 1 2 

English, .......... 4 

Public Speaking (at option of instructor), .... 1 

French or German, 2 ........ 4 

Drill, 1 

Hygiene, .......... 1 

College Life (attendance without credit). 



18 or 19 



Second Semester. 
[All work required.] 

Animal Husbandry, ........ 2 

Chemistry, . . . . . . . . . .3 

Trigonometry, ......... 3 

Algebra, .......... 2 

English, ........... 4 

Public Speaking (if not taken in semester one), ... 1 

French or German, ........ 4 

Drill, ! 

Physical Education, ........ 1 



20 or 21 
Sophomore Year. 
First Semester. 
[All work required.] 

Agronomy, .......... 3 

Physics, ......... 5 

Zoology, ......... 3 

English, ....... 2 

French or German, ...... 3 

Tactics, ........ 1 

Drill 1 

18 



1 To be taken in course when not offered for entrance. 

2 Students may continue in college the language that they present for admission, 
or they may take the other; but they must continue whichever language they so elect 
until the end of the first semester of the sophomore year. Eleven college credits are 
required in this language. 



38 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



[Jan. 



Second Semester. 

[All courses under "Required," with any two of those under " Elective."] 

[Required.] 

Elementary Horticulture, ....... 2 

Botany, .......... 4 

English, 2 

Agricultural Industry, ........ 3 

Drill 1 

Tactics, ........... 1 

Physical Education, ........ 1 

14 



French or German, 

Animal Husbandry, 

Geology, 

Physics, 

Chemistry, 

Surveying, 



[Elective.] 



Each 3 hours. Any two, 



20 



1913.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 39 

B. MAJOES: JUNIOE AND SENIOB YEAES. 

General Statement. 

A major consists of 30 hours of correlated work, to be arranged by the 
student and an instructor called the adviser. The special provisions apply- 
ing to the class of 1913 are given in the footnote. 1 

The list of courses found under each major on subsequent pages should 
not be considered as necessarily a rigid program to be followed. The heads 
of departments have suggested this series of courses as the best for the 
average man majoring in their department. Advisers may, however, make 
modifications to suit the particular needs of the student, provided these 
modifications conform precisely to the class schedule as published for the 
year. 

EULES. 

Eule 1. Election. — Each student, in the second semester of his sopho- 
more year, shall elect a major subject from the list of majors given below; 
and this major shall consist of 30 credit hours of correlated work. 

Eule 2. Minimum Credits. — The minimum number of credits for the 
junior and senior years shall be 65, inclusive of Military Drill and Physical 
Education. 

Eule 3. Maximum Credits. — The maximum number of credits for any 
semester of the junior or senior year shall be 21. 

Eule 4. Humanities and Rural Social Science. — A minimum of 15 credit 
hours in the Divisions of the Humanities and Eural Social Science shall be 
required of all students during their junior and senior years, with the follow- 
ing restriction: that a minimum of 3 credit hours will be required in each 
of the divisions. 

Eule 5. Advisers. — The work of each junior and senior will be under 
the immediate supervision of an instructor designated as major adviser. 
Ordinarily, the major adviser will be the head of the department in which 
the student intends to elect his major. Each student should consult with 
the adviser as soon as possible. The adviser has full authority to prescribe 
the student's work up to 30 hours. It is understood, however, that so far as 
practicable the individual needs of the student will be recognized. It is 
also hoped and expected that students will be disposed to seek the counsel 
of the adviser with respect to the remaining courses required for graduation. 

Eule 6. Free Electives. — Each student is required to take 30 hours in 
his major and also 15 hours in the Divisions of the Humanities and Eural 
Social Science, making a total of 45 hours. He is allowed free choice for 

1 Since it will not be possible for the class of 1913 to conform fully with the regu- 
lations concerning majors given above, the following regulations will apply to them 
in making their elections: — 

As stated below, the minimum semester credits will be 15 hours, the maximum 
21 hours, and the members of the class of 1913 will fill out their elective cards with 
these facts in mind. For the class of 1913 the required work after the sophomore 
year is to be counted as follows : — 

5 credits in the junior year in Military Science and Physical Education. 
3 credits in Economics 1. 
3 credits in English, in other subjects in the Humanities, or in Rural Social Science. 



40 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



[Jan. 



the remaining part of his required hours, this remainder amounting to 15 
hours minimum for the two years, or 35 hours maximum. 

Eule 7. Registration. — No upper classman shall register until his major 
course of study is approved by his adviser. 

(1) Course cards for recording the election of majors will be issued from 
the registrar's office on June 5. 

(2) This card must be submitted by each student to his major adviser, 
who will lay out the course for the year and will countersign the same. 

(3) Each course card must be filled out, giving the name of student, with 
his college address, also the name of parent or guardian, with the home 
address. When the elections have been entered on this card, and the balance 
of hours added by the student, the card must be returned to the registrar 
not later than June 16. 

Eule 8. Changes. — Applications for changes may be made to the dean 
in writing at any time, and, when approved by him and by the committee 
on scholarship, become operative at the beginning of the semester following, 
provided that no change in the selection of a major may be made by any 
student after registration day of his senior year. 



List of Majors. 

Agriculture. 
Prof. James A. Foord, Adviser. 
Course. Credit. 

Agronomy 3, ......... 3 

Agronomy 6, ......... 3 

Animal Husbandry 3, . . . . . . . .3 

Animal Husbandry 5, ........ 3 

Animal Husbandry 6, ........ 1 

Animal Husbandry 9, . . . . . . . .3 

Dairying 1, .......... 3 

Dairying 2, .......... 3 

Farm Administration 3, . . . . . . .3 

Farm Administration 4, . . . . . . .3 

Veterinary Science 1, ........ 3 



31 



Agronomy. 
Associate Prof. Sidney B. Haskell, Adviser. 
Course. Credit. 

Agronomy 3, ......... 3 

Agronomy 4, ......... 3 

Agronomy 5, ......... 3 

Agronomy 6, ......... 3 

Agronomy 8, ......... 3 

Animal Husbandry 5, . . . . . . .3 

Animal Husbandry 9, ........ 3 

Farm Administration 4, ....... 3 

Chemistry 7, . . . . . . . . . .3 

Chemistry 8, . . . . . . . . . .3 



30 



1913.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 



41 



Animal Husbandry. 
Associate Prof. J. Allan McLean, Adviser. 



Course. 
Agronomy 3, 
Animal Husbandry 3, 
Animal Husbandry 5, 
Animal Husbandry 6, 
Animal Husbandry 8, 
Animal Husbandry 9, 
Animal Husbandry 10, 
Animal Husbandry 11, 
Dairying 1, . 
Farm Administration 3, 
Farm Administration 4, 



Credit. 
3 
3 
3 
1 
2 
3 

2 
3 
3 
3 



29 

Dairying. 

Associate Prof. William P. B. Lockwood, Adviser. 

Course. Credit. 

Animal Husbandry 5, . . . . . . . .3 

Animal Husbandry 6, . . . . . . - .1 

Animal Husbandry 8, . . . . . . . .2 

Animal Husbandry 9, . . . . . . . .3 

Animal Husbandry 11, ........ 2 

Dairying 1, .......... 3 

Dairying 2, .......... 3 

Dairying 3, .......... 3 

Dairying 4, .......... 3 

Farm Administration 3, ....... 3 

Farm Administration 4, ....... 3 

29 

Poultry Husbandry. 
Associate Prof. John C. Graham, Adviser. 
Course. Credit. 

Poultry Husbandry 1, . . . . . . . .2 

Poultry Husbandry 2, . . . . . . . .2 

Poultry Husbandry 3, . . . . . . . .1 

Poultry Husbandry 4, ....... 1-3 

Poultry Husbandry 5, . . . . . . . .1 

Poultry Husbandry 6, . . . . . . . .3 

Poultry Husbandry 7, . . . . . . . .3 

Poultry Husbandry 9, . . . . . . . .3 

Pomology 1, . . . . . . . . . .3 

Agronomy 3, ......... 3 

Animal Husbandry 5, ........ 3 

Animal Husbandry 9, ........ 3 

"Veterinary Science 1, ........ 3 



General Horticulture. 



31 



Prof. Frank A. Waugh, Adviser. 
This major will consist of courses selected from the Departments of Pomology, 
Floriculture, Market Gardening, Landscape Gardening and Forestry, to suit the par- 
ticular needs of the student. In special cases, courses from the Department of 
Agronomy will also be counted toward the major in general horticulture. 



42 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



[Jan. 



Floriculture. 

Prof. Edward A. White, Adviser. 
Course. Credit. 

Floriculture 1, ......... 4 

Floriculture 2, 4 

Floriculture 3, ......... 3 

Floriculture 4, . . . . . . . . .3 

Horticulture 3, ......... 3 

Horticulture 4, ......... 3 

Entomology 1, ......... 3 

Market Gardening 2, . . . . . .3 

Botany 2, - .4 

30 

Note. — Horticulture 3 and 4 is a junior subject, but to balance the work for the 
two years it would be better for the floricultural students to take the course in the 
senior year. 

Forestry. 

Prof. William D. Clark, Adviser. 
Course. Credit. 

Forestry 1, .......... 3 

Forestry 2 3 

Forestry 3 3 

Forestry 4, . . . . . . . . .3 

Forestry 5, .......... 2 

Forestry 6 2 

Entomology 5, ......... 3 

Horticulture 3, ......... 3 

Horticulture 4, ......... 3 

Botany 13 4 



Landscape Gardening. 

Prof. Frank A. Waugh, Adviser 
Course. 

Landscape Gardening 1, 

Landscape Gardening 2, 

Landscape Gardening 3, 

Landscape Gardening 4, 

Landscape Gardening 5, 

Landscape Gardening 6, 

Landscape Gardening 7, 

Landscape Gardening 8, 
Drawing 1, . 
Drawing 2, . 
Horticulture 3, 



29 



Credit. 
3 
3 
3 
3 
2 
2 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



31 



Landscape Gardening 6 will probably be given quite differently in alternate years, 
and thus should be open to both juniors and seniors. 

Courses for juniors only: Landscape Gardening 1 and 2, Drawing 1 and 2. 

Courses for seniors and graduates only: Landscape Gardening 7 and 8. 

Courses open to juniors and seniors, both if possible: Horticulture 3 and 4 and 
possibly Landscape Gardening 3 and 4. 

This grouping of subjects is offered only as an example. Other groupings may be 
approved by the adviser, but such other groupings must be subject to the class 
schedule. 



1913. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 



43 



Pomology. 
Prof. Feed C. Sears, Adviser. 



Course. 
Pomology 1, . 
Pomology 2, . 
Pomology 3, . 
Pomology 4, . 
Botany 5, 
Botany 7, 
Agronomy 6, 
Farm Administration 3, 
Farm Administration 4, 
Entomology 2, 



Credit. 
3 
3 
3 
'3 
2 
5 
3 
3 
3 
3 

31 



Agricultural Chemistry. 
Associate Prof. Charles A. Peters, Adviser. 
Course. Credit. 

Chemistry 5, ......... 5 

Chemistry 6, ......... 5 

Chemistry 9, . . . . . . . .5 

Chemistry 10, ......... 5 

Chemistry 11, ......... 5 

Chemistry 12, 14 or 16, 5 

Chemistry 13, 3 

Chemistry 15, ......... 3 

Chemistry 18, 2 

38 

The major will consist of 30 credit hours selected from this list. The student will 
be advised concerning other subjects suited to be taken in connection with Chemistry. 



Economic Entomology. 
Prof. Henry T. Fernald, Adviser. 
Course. Credit. 

Entomology 1, ......... 3 

Entomology 2, 2 

Entomology 3, ......... 4 

Entomology 4, ......... 4 

Entomology 5, ......... 3 

Entomology 8, ......... 3 

Botany 3, .......... 4 

Botany 4, .......... 2 

Zoology 3, ........... 3 

Zoology 4, .......... 3 



31 



A major in Economic Entomology does not necessarily include all the subjects given 
in this list, but may be varied to some extent, in accordance with the future plans 
of the student, other modifications being permissible. 



44 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [Jan. 



Plant Physiology and Pathology. 
Prof. George E. Stone, Adviser. 
Course. Credit. 

Botany 3, ........-■ -4 

Botany 4, . . . - ■ • • . . 2 

Botany 10 4 or 5 

Botany 14, 4 

Chemistry 5, . . . . . . • • • 5 

Chemistry 6, . . . . . . • • ■ .5 

Entomology 1, ......... 3 

Entomology 2, ......... 2 

29 or 30 

Agricultural Education. 
Prof. William R. Hart, Adviser. 
Course. Credit. 

Agricultural Education 1, ....... 3 

Agricultural Education 2, ....... 3 

Agricultural Education 3, ....... 2 

Agricultural Education 4, ....... 3 

Agronomy 3, ......... 3 

Dairying 5, .......... 2 

Farm Administration 3, . . . . . . .3 

Poultry Husbandry 1, . . . . . . . .2 

Market Gardening 2, ) 
Agronomy 5, . ) 

Botany 5, .......... 2 

Pomology 1, . . . . . . . . .3 

29 

Some substitutions of other technical courses for some of the technical ' courses 
above mentioned will be made to meet the needs of individual students. 



Summary. 

There are four preliminary step3 which a student should take in arranging 
for his major work. 

1. Select a major. 

2. Confer with major adviser for arrangement of courses, the plan to be 
approved by adviser in accordance with Eule 5 previously stated. 

3. Select courses covering the four semesters of the junior and senior 
years in such a way that a minimum of 15 credits will be taken in the two 
Divisions, the Humanities and Sural Social Science; the distribution of all 
but 3 of these credits may be decided by the student. 

4. Choose other courses so that the total number of credits for any semes- 
ter shall be not less than 16 nor more than 21. (See Eules 2 and 3.) 



1913.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 45 



C. UNDEKGKADUATE COUESES. 

[All courses given in the first semester bear odd numbers; all given in the second 
semester bear even numbers. Studies are pursued in courses, " course " implying 
the study given a subject within one semester, without regard to the total number 
of hours or to the number of credits. The special mention of certain courses as 
prerequisite to other courses does not imply that no courses but those so mentioned 
are " preliminary or preparatory" within the meaning of the Book of Rules.] 

DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE. 

Professor Fookd. 

AGRONOMY. 

Associate Professor Haskell, Dr. Brooks, Mr. McDonald. 

"Required Course. 
1. Soils and Fertilizers. — A study of the formation, classification and 
physical and chemical properties of soils. This is followed by study of 
methods of soil improvement and of maintenance of fertility, including the 
use of farm manures, commercial fertilizers and soil amendments. Pre- 
requisites, Chemistry 1 and 2. Sophomores; 3 hours. Credit, 3. 

Associate Professor Haskell and Mr. McDonald. 



Elective Courses. 

3. Field and Forage Crops. — History, classification, cultivation, har- 
vesting, commercial grading and valuation. The crops studied are the cereal 
grains, grasses, legumes, forage and root crops suitable to New England 
conditions. The work includes lecture, laboratory and field study of these 
various crops. Prerequisites, Agronomy 1 and Botany 2. For juniors 
primarily; 1 lecture and 2 laboratory periods. Credit, 3. 

Mr. McDonald. 

4. Advanced Field Crops. — Commercial production of grain, hay and 
root crops. Lecture, laboratory, and field study of the purity, quality, and 
vitality of the seed of these crops and the handling, grading and judging 
of their products. The work offered will not be confined to New England 
conditions. Prerequisite, Agronomy 3. For juniors primarily; 2 lectures 
and 1 laboratory period. Credit 3. Mr. McDonald. 

5. Advanced Soils. — A field, laboratory and lecture course on soils; 
their nature, composition, physical qualities, improvement. Field work, as 
far as the season allows, consists of detailed soil surveys in different parts 
of the Connecticut valley; this followed by laboratory work on the physical 
properties of the soil collected, on the effect of fertilizers on the soil, and 
on the mixing of fertilizers. Prerequisites, Agronomy 1 and Chemistry 1 
and 2. For seniors primarily; 1 lecture period and 1 4-hour laboratory 
period weekly. Credit, 3. Associate Professor Haskell. 



46 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [Jan. 

6. Drainage and Irrigation. — A field and lecture course on soil im- 
provement, by drainage and irrigation. As a thesis each man is required, 
after studying an area of wet or swampy land, to present plans and esti- 
mates for its reclamation. Prerequisites, Agronomy 1 and Mathematics 8. 
Juniors and seniors; 1 lecture period and 1 4-hour laboratory period weekly. 
Credit, 3. Associate Professor Haskell. 

8. Manures and Fertilizers. — An advanced course, giving a general 
discussion of the different theories which have been held relative to the 
functions and importance of manures and fertilizers, and leading up to the 
views at present accepted. Each of the important manures and fertilizers will 
be discussed, its origin and its chemical and physical characteristics being 
considered. Each material taken up will be studied in relation to its capacity 
to supply plant food and to its effects upon soil texture, moisture, tempera- 
ture and flora. Considerable attention will be devoted to consideration of 
the experimental work which has been done, and which is now in progress, 
in manures and fertilizers. This course is intended for seniors only. 
Prerequisite, Agronomy 1; 3 lectures a week, with occasional seminars. 
Credit, 3. Dr. Brooks and Associate Professor Haskell. 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY. 

Associate Professor McLean, Mr. Quaife. 
Required Course. 

2. Elementary Judging. — A study of the different market classes and 
grades of horses, cattle, sheep and swine. The purpose of this course is to 
familiarize beginners with the different classes of stock, and to give them a 
grounding in live stock judging. Text-book, Craig's " Live Stock Judging." 
Freshmen; 2 laboratory periods. Credit, 2. 

Associate Professor McLean and Mr. Quaife. 

Elective Courses. 

3. Breeds and Types op Live Stock. — A course covering the origin, 
history, development and characteristics of the different breeds of horses, 
cattle, sheep and swine. Text-book, Plumb's "Breeds and Types of Farm 
Animals." Prerequisite, Animal Husbandry 2. Sophomores; 1 lecture and 
2 laboratory periods. Credit, 3. Mr. Quaife. 

5. Principles of Breeding. — Text-book, Davenport's " Principles of 
Breeding." Prerequisite, Zoology 1. Juniors; 3 lectures. Credit, 3. 

Associate Professor McLean. 



6. Live-Stock Management. — The work of this course consists of labora- 
tory work by the individual students in the handling of live stock; with 
horses, such work as halter breaking, breaking to drive, driving, harnessing, 
casting, and fitting for show will be done; similarly, the practical handling 
of cattle, sheep and swine will be fully treated. Special study is given to 
halter making, splicing, hitches, knots and all rope work. Prerequisite, 
Animal Husbandry 3. Juniors; 1 laboratory. Credit, 1. Mr. Quaife. 



1913.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 47 

8. Advanced Stock Judging. — This course is designed to equip Animal 
Husbandry students in the judging of classes of different types of live 
stock, to strengthen them in the selection of superior sires, and equip them 
for stock judging at fairs. Visits will be made to the best herds for the 
various breeds of stock in the State. Judging teams to represent the college 
will be selected largely from this class. Prerequisite, Animal Husbandry 3. 
Juniors; 2 laboratory periods. Credit, 2. 

' Associate Professor McLean. 

9. Feeding and Management. — A study of the principles of animal 
nutrition; of the composition and qualities of feeding materials; of the 
feeding, care and management of dairy cattle from birth to maturity, with 
especial attention to economic production; a similar study of beef animals 
and beef production. Text -book, Henry's " Feeds and Feeding." Pre- 
requisite, Animal Husbandry 3. Seniors; 3 lectures. Credit, 3. 

Associate Professor McLean and Mr. Qtjaife. 

10. Feeding and Management. — A continuation of Course 9, dealing in 
a similar manner with horses, sheep and swine. Prerequisite, Course 9. 
Seniors; 3 lectures. Credit, 3. 

Associate Professor McLean and Mr. Quaife. 

11. Herd and Stud-book Study. — An advanced course in the study of 
the breeds of live stock, familiarizing the student with the most productive 
sires and dams of the various breeds, and the successful lines and methods 
of breeding. Prerequisites, Animal Husbandry 5 and 8. Seniors; 2 hours. 
Credit, 2. Associate Professor McLean. 

DAIRYING. 

Associate Professor Lockwood, Professor Marshall, Mr. Story, Mr. Coons. 
Elective Courses. 

1. Milk and Milk Composition. — The development of the dairy business 
in the United States; the composition, secretion and general characteristics 
of milk; contamination and fermentation; the study of analysis of milk 
products by use of the Babcock test for fat, test for acidity and adultera- 
tion, and ordinary preservatives; moisture tests for butter; methods for 
testing herds and developing them to higher efficiency; problems. Two 
lecture hours and 1 2-hour laboratory period. Credit, 3. 

Associate Professor Lockwood. 

2. Buttermaking. — A study of separators and cream separation ; hand- 
ling milk and cream for buttermaking ; preparation of starters, and ripening 
cream; churning; markets and their requirements; marketing, scoring and 
judging butter; management; problems; dairy machinery and care thereof. 
Prerequisite, Course 1; one lecture hour and 2 2-hour laboratory periods. 
Credit, 3. Associate Professor Lockwood. 

3. Dairy Bacteriology. — A study of bacteriology relative to market 
milk and dairy work. Prerequisites, Courses 1 and 2, Bacteriology 1; 3 
2-hour laboratory periods. Credit, 3. Professor Marshall. 



48 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [Jan. 

4. Market Milk and Milk Products. — A study of market milk con- 
ditions, extent and development of the business; supply and delivery; food 
value of milk and its use as food; milk and its relation to the- public health.; 
methods for the proper handling and preparing of milk and cream for direct 
consumption; certified milk, requirements and production; pasteurizing; 
sterilizing; standardizing and modifying; milk laws and inspection. The 
manufacture of milk products other than butter, including cheese, condensed 
milk, cottage cheese, casein, milk powder, ice cream, etc. Prerequisites, 
Dairying 1, and Bacteriology 1; two lecture hours and 1 2-hour laboratory 
period. Credit, 3. Associate Professor Lockwood. 

5. Dairying. — A course designed primarily for teachers of secondary 
agriculture. The work given will cover briefly the composition and secretion 
of milk, the Babcock fat test, the relation of bacteria to dairy work and 
principles of creaming; separators; elementary buttermaking ; proper 
methods of handling milk and cream; and the relation of market milk to the 
public health. One lecture hour and 1 2-hour laboratory period. Credit, 2. 

Associate Professor Lockwood. 



FARM ADMINISTRATION. 

Professor Fooed. 
Elective Courses. 

3. Farm Buildings and Machinery. — A study of the material equip- 
ment of the farm aside from the land; farm buildings, their location, plan 
and arrangement; water supply; fencing problems; farm power; farm 
machinery; wagons. Prerequisites, Agronomy 1, Animal Husbandry 2, 
Physics 1. Primarily for seniors; 2 laboratory periods and 1 lecture hour. 
Credit, 3. Professor Foord. 

4. Farm Management. — The organization of the farm as a business 
enterprise. A discussion and study of some of the problems that confront 
the modern farmer, such as the choice of a farm, systems and types of farm- 
ing, labor, marketing, records and farm accounts. Prerequisites, Agronomy 
1 and 3, Animal Husbandry 2 and 3. Primarily for seniors; 2 lecture or 
recitation hours and 1 laboratory period. Credit, 3. Professor Foord. 

POULTRY HUSBANDRY. 

Associate Professor Graham, Mr. Brown. 

Elective Courses. 

1. Elements of Poultry Culture. — This course consists of a compre- 
hensive study of poultry-house construction, poultry-house equipment, winter- 
egg production, types and breeds of poultry. Juniors; 2 lectures. Credit, 2. 

Associate Professor Graham. 

2. Elements of Poultry Culture. — This is a continuation of Course 1, 
treating the subjects of incubation, brooding, care of growing stock, market 
poultry, including capons, roasters and broilers, and diseases of poultry. 
Juniors; 2 lectures. Credit, 2. Associate Professor Graham. 



1913.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 49 

3. Poultry Practice Work. — This is a practical laboratory course in 
poultry carpentry, caponizing, killing and picking; dressing and packing 
poultry, sorting and preparing eggs for market. Must be preceded or ac- 
companied by Course 1. Juniors; 1 laboratory period. Credit, 1. 

Mr. Brown. 

4. Incubation and Brooding. — In this course students are required to 
set up and operate incubators and brooders, make a systematic study of the 
development of the chick in the egg, and the care of sitting hens. This 
course must be preceded or accompanied by Course 2. Juniors; time to be 
arranged. Credit, 1 to 3. Mr. Brown. 

5. Pen Management. — This is a practical laboratory course. Students 
are required to care for a pen of fowls, keeping accurate records of eggs 
produced, food consumed, weather conditions, health of fowls, and profit and 
loss; must be preceded or accompanied by Course 1. Juniors; time to be 
arranged. Credit, 1. Mr. Brown. 

'6. Poultry Management. — In this course a detailed study of large 
poultry farms and equipment, such as bone cutters, feed cutters, cramming 
machines, etc., will be carried on. It includes the laying out and planning 
of poultry buildings of all kinds, the mating of fowls, and the preparing 
of birds for exhibition. Attention to poultry diseases and investigation 
work carried on by experiment stations is prominent in this course. A few 
good poultry plants will be visited by the class for practical demonstrations. 
Prerequisites, Courses 1, 2, 3 and 4. Seniors; 2 lectures, 1 laboratory period. 
Credit, 3. Associate Professor Graham and Mr. Brown. 

7. Advanced Poultry Judging. — This course includes a study of the 
origin and history of breeds and varieties, poultry organizations and poultry 
shows. The American Standard of Perfection will be used as a text. Pre- 
requisites, Courses 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5. Seniors; 1 lecture and 2 laboratory 
periods. Credit, 3. Associate Professor Graham and Mr. Brown. 

9. Market Poultry and Poultry Products. — This course includes the 
study of market classifications of poultry, eggs and feathers; the require- 
ments of different markets, methods of marketing, advantages and disad- 
vantages of cold storage of poultry and eggs. Students will be required to 
fatten several lots of chickens by different methods and rations. Accurate 
data must be kept showing the gain in weight and quality, also the cost of 
feed, labor, etc., and the profit and loss. Judging and scoring of market 
poultry, both alive and dressed, and market eggs will be an important 
feature of this course. Prerequisites, Courses 1, 2 and 3. Seniors; 1 lecture 
or eonferenee period and laboratory periods to be arranged. Credit, 3. 

Associate Professor Graham and Mr. Brown. 



50 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [Jan. 



DIVISION OF HORTICULTURE. 

Professor "Waugh. 

[The general subject of horticulture divides naturally into the subjects of po- 
mology, floriculture, landscape gardening and market gardening. A number of 
courses relate to more than one of these subjects, and are therefore grouped here 
under the general designation of horticulture.] 

Required Course (General). 

2. Nubseey Practice. — This course treats of the fundamental opera- 
tions of horticulture — propagation, pruning, cultivation — as related to the 
physiology of the plant. Lectures and practicums ; Bailey's " Nursery Book " 
as text in propagation. Sophomores; 2 hours. Credit, 2. 

Mr. Chenoweth. 
Elective Courses (General). 

3. Plant Materials. — This course aims to make the student familiar 
with the character of the trees, shrubs and herbaceous perennials used in 
ornamental work, and with the methods of propagating them. Prerequisite, 
Horticulture 2; 2 lecture periods and 1 laboratory period. Credit, 3. 

Professor White. 

4. Plant Materials. — A continuation of Course 3, taking up the field 
use of trees, shrubs and herbaceous plants, their native habitats, soils and 
plant associations, with a view to supplying to students in landscape garden- 
ing and floriculture a knowledge of plant species. Frequent practicums and 
field excursions. Prerequisite, Horticulture 3 ; 2 lecture periods and 1 labora- 
tory period. Credit, 3. Professor White. 

6. Plant Breeding. — This course is designed to introduce advanced 
students to the best modern views of variation, heredity and evolution, and 
to the best methods of studying the phenomena found in these subjects. 
The principles educed apply to both animal breeding and plant breeding, 
but the laboratory work (of which there is considerable) is concerned 
chiefly with plant life. Some practice work in hybridization and selection 
is undertaken, and students are trained as far as possible in the practical 
application of those principles which have direct bearing on the breeding of 
plants and the cultivation of crops. Seniors and graduates; open only to 
students well prepared in agricultural or horticultural subjects; 2 lecture 
periods and 1 2-hour laboratory period. [Not given in 1913-14.] Credit, 3. 

FLORICULTURE. 

Professor White. 
Elective Courses. 
1. Greenhouse Management. — This course is designed to familiarize 
students with methods followed in the management of greenhouse crops. 
The students are instructed in the practical operation of glazing concrete, 
bench construction, bulb culture, greenhouse watering, fumigating and venti- 
lating, in the care of furnaces, and in the methods of propagation of green- 



1913.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 51 

house plants by seeds and cuttings. This is designed as a laboratory course, 
and students electing it will be expected to arrange their hours according 
to the needs of the work. Prerequisite, Horticulture 2. Juniors; 7 hours a 
week. Credit, 4. Professor White. 

2. Greenhouse Management. — A continuation of Course 1, including 
also a study of the location, arrangement and construction of greenhouses; 
the drawing of plans for commercial and private ranges, to show foundations 
and details in construction of superstructure; arrangement of heating pipes; 
estimate of comparative cost of different methods of construction; drafting 
specifications. Design making and table decorations are considered in this 
course. Juniors ; prerequisite, Floriculture 1 ; 7 hours as stated under Course 
1. Credit, 4. Professor White. 

3. Pall Greenhouse Crops. — A study of important fall and winter 
crops and their care, — chrysanthemums, carnations, violets, roses, palms 
and various conservatory plants; the importation, purchase and growth of 
bulbous material; the preparation of material for forcing; house and church 
decorating. Lectures, text-books and laboratory exercises. Prerequisites, 
Floriculture 1 and 2. Seniors; 5 hours. Credit, 3. Professor White. 

4. Spring Greenhouse Crops. — The culture of individual crops in their 
relation to spring work in a florist establishment. A critical study of 
methods of propagating bedding plants, the nature and use of these plants, 
practice in planting them and in the spring care of herbaceous perennials 
and wholesale and retail marketing of spring plants. Lectures, text-books 
and practical exercises. Seniors; prerequisites, Floriculture 1, 2 and 3; 
5 hours. Credit, 3. Professor White. 

FORESTRY. 

Professor Clakk. 

Elective Courses. 
1. Principles op Forestry. — A lecture course for the purpose of giving 
the students a general view of the whole field of forestry and what forestry 
attempts to accomplish and has accomplished. Two lectures; juniors and sen- 
iors; not required of students who propose to major in forestry. Credit, 2. 

Professor Clark. 

3. Dendrology. — During the first part of the semester frequent field 
trips will be made to identify and study the habits of our native forest 
trees. Later, the classification, range, distribution, forest habits, quality, 
uses and identification of wood of the commercial timber trees of the 
United States will be studied. Two 2-hour periods; lectures, recitations, 
laboratory or field work at option of instructor; juniors. Credit, 3. 

Professor Clark. 

4. Silviculture. — Factors influencing forest growth ; forest types ; silvi- 
cultural systems; care and protection of forests; forest description; forest 
nursery practice and forest planting. Three lectures weekly until May 1; 
during May and June, one lecture and one 4-hour field period weekly; 
juniors. Prerequisite, Forestry 3. Credit, 3. Professor Clark. 



52 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [Jan. 

5. Forest Mensuration. — Methods of determining the volume of trees, 
logs and entire forests. Methods of computing volume tables, tree and 
forest growth and yield tables. Timber estimating. Three lectures; 72 
hours of field work; seniors. Credit, 5. Professor Clark. 

6. Forest Valuation and Regulation. — Methods of determining the 
costs of growing timber crops and of arriving at the value of future growth 
or standing immature growth. Methods of regulating the harvest of crops 
so as to secure a sustained or annual yield. Prerequisite, Forestry 5; 
seniors; 3 lectures. Credit, 3 Professor Clark. 

LANDSCAPE GARDENING. 

Professor Waugh, Mr. Harbison. 

Elective Courses. 

1. Elements of Landscape Gardening. — Eeconnoissance surveys and 
mapping, with special reference to the methods used in landscape gardening; 
detailed study of selected designs of leading landscape gardeners; grade 
design, road design and field work. Students should have preparation in 
surveying, mathematics, plant materials and drawing. Must be followed by 
Course 2. Juniors; 6 hours a week. Credit, 3. Mr. Harrison. 

2. Elements of Landscape Gardening. — As stated under Course 1. 
Prerequisite, Course 1. 

3. General Design. — Field notes ; examination of completed works and 
those under construction; design of architectural details, planting plans, 
gardens and parks and private grounds; written reports of individual prob- 
lems. Seniors; prerequisites, Landscape Gardening 1 and 2, and either plant 
materials (Horticulture 3 and 4) or advanced mathematics; must be followed 
by Course 4; 6 hours. Credit, 3. Professor Waugh. 

4. General Design. — As stated under Course 3. Prerequisite, Course 3. 

5. Theory of Landscape Art. — The general theory and applications of 
landscape study, including a brief history of the art. Seniors and graduates ; 
2 hours. Credit, 2. Professor Waugh. 

6. Architecture. — The history of architectural development, the differ- 
ent historic types, with special reference to the underlying principles of 
construction and design and their relations to landscape design. Illustrated 
lectures, conferences, practice in designing; 2 hours. Credit, 2. (Alternat- 
ing with Course 10.) Mr. Harrison. 

7. Civic Art. — The principles and applications of modern civic art, in- 
cluding city design, city improvement, village improvement and rural im- 
provement. Prerequisites, Courses 1, 2 and 3; must be followed by Course 
8; 6 hours. Credit, 3. Professor Waugh. 

8. Civic Art. — As stated under Course 7. Prerequisite, Course 7. 



1913.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 53 

10. Construction and Maintenance. — Detailed instruction in methods 
of. construction and planting in carrying out plans, in organization, report- 
ing, accounting, estimating, etc.; maintenance work in parks and on estates, 
its organization, management, cost, etc. Two hours. Credit, 2. (Alternat- 
ing with Course 6 and not to be given in 1912-13.) Mr. Harrison. 

MARKET GARDENING. 

Assistant Professor Yeaw. 

Elective Courses. 

2. Elements op Market Gardening. — A course designed for an intro- 
duction to market gardening as a business. The work consists primarily of 
actual field experience in handling vegetable crops from seed to maturity. 
This is supplemented with lectures and text-book, in which a study of methods, 
soils, fertilization, tillage and management is made. Juniors; 5 hours. 
Credit, 3. Assistant Professor Yeaw. 

3. Advanced Market Gardening. — A continuation of the work begun 
in Market Gardening 2, taking up problems of seed growing, selection of 
varieties, crop management, harvesting, storage and marketing. A study is 
made of the greenhouse vegetable industry, and considerable time devoted 
to growing the special forced crops. Some time is given to a systematic 
study of vegetable description, classification and nomenclature. Collateral 
reading is required. Seniors; prerequisite, Market Gardening 2; 5 hours. 
Credit, 3. Assistant Professor Yeaw. 

POMOLOGY. 

Professor Sears, Mr. Chenoweth, Mr. Rees. 
Elective Courses. 

1. Practical Pomology. — General. — A study of the general principles 
of the growing of fruits, dealing with such questions as selection of site, 
soils, windbreaks, laying out plantations, choice of stock, pruning, spraying, 
etc. Text and reference books; field and laboratory exercises. Prerequisite, 
Horticulture 2. Juniors; 4 hours. Credit, 3. Professor Sears. 

2. Practical Pomology. — Special. — The special application of the gen- 
eral principles discussed in Course 1 to the culture of the principal kinds of 
fruits, such as apples, pears, peaches, plums, cherries and quinces; grape 
culture and the culture of small fruits, such as blackberries, raspberries, 
currants, gooseberries and strawberries. Text-books, lectures and reference 
books; field and laboratory exercises. Prerequisites, Horticulture 2 and 
Pomology 1. Juniors; 4 hours. Credit, 3. Professor Sears. 

3. Systematic Pomology. — A study of the varieties of the different 
fruits and of nomenclature, with critical descriptions; special reference being 
given to relationships and classification. Text-books, laboratory and field 
exercises. Prerequisites, Horticulture 2 and Pomology 1 and 2. Seniors; 
4 hours. Credit, 3. Mr. Chenoweth. 



54 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [Jan. 

4. Commercial Pomology. — The storing and marketing of fruits ; in- 
cludes a discussion of storage houses, the handling and storing of fruits, 
fruit packages, methods of grading and packing, etc. Text and reference 
books; laboratory exercises. Seniors; prerequisites, Horticulture 2, Pomol- 
ogy 1, 2 and 3; 4 hours. Credit, 3. Mr. Chenoweth. 

6. Spraying. — A study of (a) spraying materials, their composition, 
manufacture and preparation for use; the desirable and objectionable quali- 
ties of each material, formulas used, cost, tests of purity. (&) Spraying 
machinery, including all the principal types of pumps, nozzles, hose and 
vehicles; their structure and care, (c) Orchard methods in the application 
of the various materials used, with the important considerations for spraying 
each fruit and for combating each orchard pest. This course is designed 
especially to familiarize the student with the practical details of actual 
spraying work in the orchard. Spray materials are prepared, spraying ap- 
paratus is examined and tested, old pumps are overhauled and repaired, and 
the actual spraying is done in the college orchards and small fruit planta- 
tions. Prerequisites, Horticulture 2, Pomology 1 and 2. Seniors; 3 hours 
(1 lecture period and 1 laboratory period). Credit, 2. 

Professor Sears. 

DBA WING. 

Mr. Harrison. 
Elective Courses. 

1. Freehand Drawing. — Lettering ; freehand perspective ; sketching 
from type models, leaves, flowers and trees, insects and small animals; 
laying flat and graded washes in water colors; water color rendering of 
leaves, flowers and trees ; conventional coloring and map rendering in 
water colors; conventional signs and mapping in ink. Juniors; 6 hours. 
Credit, 3. Mr. Harrison. 

2. Mechanical Drawing. — Inking exercises ; geometric problems ; pro- 
jection; intersections, isometric; shades and shadows; parallel; angular 
and oblique perspective; perspective drawing of buildings. Students should 
have preparation in plane and solid geometry. Juniors; 6 hours. Credit 3. 

Mr. Harrison. 



1913.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 55 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE. 

Professor Paige. 

BOTANY. 

Professor Stone, Assistant Professor Osmun, Mr. McLaughlin, Mr. Smith. 

[The object of the courses in botany is to teach those topics pertaining to the 
science which have a bearing upon economic and scientific agriculture. Under- 
graduate work extending through five semesters is offered. Considerable latitude is 
allowed students in the senior year in their electives ; and, besides the courses here 
outlined, students often take up the study of histology or of systematic botany, the 
microscopic examination of pure and adulterated human and cattle foods, spices and 
drugs, etc. Students sufficiently prepared are occasionally permitted to undertake 
special physiological and pathological investigations. A botanical conference is held 
monthly wherein new problems in botanical science are considered by graduate stu- 
dents and the seniors who elect botany.] 

Bequired Course. 

2. General Botany. — The morphology, physiology and classification of 
plants. This course is fundamental. Its aim is to lay a foundation for 
the more specialized courses in botany which follow and to provide a gen- 
eral knowledge of the science for those students who will not take further 
work in the department. This course is prerequisite to all other courses 
given by the department. Laboratory work consists in the microscopic 
study of representatives of all the more important plant groups. This 
phase of the work is almost entirely devoted to morphology and histology, 
especial attention being given to the structure of higher plants. The 
lectures aim to amplify and interpret the laboratory work, dealing also 
with the function (physiology), classification (taxonomy) and ecology of 
plants. Each student is required to collect and prepare an herbarium of 
75 species of native plants. Gray's " New Manual of Botany " is used 
in ' determining and naming plants. Though only , 1 lecture period is 
scheduled for this course, it is understood that laboratory hours may be 
used for lectures at' the discretion of the instructor. Sophomores; 1 lec- 
ture; 3 laboratory periods. Credit, 4. 

Assistant Professor Osmun and Mr. McLaughlin. 

Elective Courses. 

3. Cryptogamic Botany. — Systematic study of typical forms of the 
lower plants (bacteria, algae, fungi, lichens, mosses and ferns) ; instruc- 
tion in laboratory technique and methods, and the making of herbaria 
of lichens, mosses and ferns. Laboratory work and lectures; field excursions 
for the purpose of observing environmental habits and collecting material 
for laboratory study; collateral reading. This course is intended for those 
students who wish to specialize in biology; its purpose is to afford more 
thorough scientific training than is offered in Course 5, and students elect- 
ing this course may attend the lectures in Course 5. Prerequisite, Botany 2. 
Primarily for juniors. 1 lecture hour and 3 2-hour laboratory periods. 
Credit, 4. Assistant Professor Osmun. 



56 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [Jan. 

4. Cryptogamic Botany. — This is a continuation of Course 3. Pre- 
requisites, Botany 2 and 3. Primarily for juniors; 1 lecture hour and 2 
2-hour laboratory periods. Credit, 2. Assistant Professor Osmun. 

5. Plant Pathology. — This course comprises a study of the common 
diseases of crops and consideration of the methods for their prevention and 
control, and is intended especially for students in horticulture and agri- 
culture. Laboratory work and lectures. Prerequisite, Botany 2. Pri- 
marily for juniors; 1 1-hour lecture and 12-hour laboratory period. Credit, 2. 

Professor Stone, Assistant Professor Osmun and Mr. McLaughlin. 

7. Plant Pathology. — This course includes a study of the diseases of 
one or more crops and the methods of controlling them. Laboratory work 
and lectures, together with extensive reading of experiment station litera- 
ture. The course is intended for those who wish to become more familiar 
with the diseases of one or more groups of economic plants. Prereq- 
uisite, Botany 2. Seniors; students who take this course and continue 
in botany must take Course 8; 1 lecture period and 3 3-hour laboratory 
periods. Credit, 5. Professor Stone. 

8. Plant Pathology. — As stated in Course 7. Prerequisite, Course 7. 

9. Economic Fungi. — This course comprises the study of economic 
fungi from a technical point of view, and is intended for those students who 
wish for a more comprehensive knowledge of the phylogenetic relationship 
of fungi. Laboratory work and lectures. Problems of a practical or 
technical nature intimately associated with the control of diseases are 
taken up. Special monographs and more important station literature treat- 
ing' of the life history of fungi, etc., are studied. Prerequisites, Botany 
2, 3 and 4. Must be followed by Course 10 ; seniors ; 1 1-hour lecture period 
and 2 or 3 3-hour laboratory periods. Credit, 4 or 5. 

Professor Stone. 

10. Economic Fungi. — -As stated in Course 9. Prerequisite, Course 9. 

11. Plant Physiology. — This course is largely experimental and is 
especially adapted to the needs of students who are taking chemistry. 
Laboratory work and lectures; various handbooks on plant physiology. 
Prerequisite, Botany 2. Must be followed by Course 12; seniors; 1 1-hour 
lecture period and 3 3-hour laboratory periods. Credit, 5. 

Professor Stone and Mr. McLaughlin. 

12. Plant Physiology. — As stated in Course 11. Prerequisite, Course 
11. 

13. Shade-Tree Management. — Physiology and pathology of shade 
trees. This course includes a comprehensive study of the diseases, struc- 
ture and functions of trees and shrubs, and of every agency which in any 
way affects shade trees. Laboratory work and lectures; extensive reference 
reading. Designed for those students who intend to take charge of parks 



1913.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 57 

or large estates, or to become tree wardens, city foresters, landscape 
gardeners or professional advisers and caretakers. Prerequisite, Botany 
2. Must be followed by Course 14; seniors; 1 1-hour lecture period and 
2 3-hour laboratory periods. Credit, 4. Professor Stone. 

14. Shade-Tree Management. — Physiology and pathology of shade 
trees. As stated in Course 13. Prerequisite, Course 13. 

GENERAL AND AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY. 

Professors Lindsey and Wellington, 1 Associate Professors Chamberlain and 
Peters, Assistant Professor Anderson, Messrs. Bogue, Noyes, Fowler and 
Gates. 
[The course in chemistry aims to teach accurate observation, logical thinking and 
systematic and constant industry. It likewise aims to give those students following 
the several agricultural occupations, or who are preparing themselves for work 
as teachers and investigators in the other sciences, a knowledge of the subject suffi- 
cient to enable them to apply it in their various lines of work. Students taking all 
of the undergraduate courses and who intend following chemistry as a vocation are 
prepared for positions as instructors in high schools and colleges, in the agricultural 
experiment stations, the United States Department of Agriculture, as well as in 
fertilizer, cattle food, sugar and dairy industries. Students are encouraged to take 
graduate work leading especially to the degree of M.Sc, and to thus prepare them- 
selves for advanced positions as teachers in the agricultural colleges, as research 
chemists, and likewise for the more responsible positions connected with the different 
agricultural industries of the country. A fuller knowledge of the course of instruc- 
tion will be found by consulting the following outline.] 

'Required Courses. 

1. General Chemistry. — The Non-metals. — An introduction to the 
fundamental chemical laws, together with a study of the common acid- 
forming elements and their compounds. Kahlenberg's " Outlines of Chem- 
istry " is used as a text. The laboratory work is of two kinds. Those 
beginning the subject form one division and those who present chemistry 
for entrance are grouped in other divisions. The advance divisions, in 
addition to work not usually done in high schools, study simple volumetric 
quantitative processes such as the determination of the hardness of water, 
the available oxygen in hydrogen peroxide, the chlorine in soluble chlorides, 
the oxygen in bleaching powder and the strengths of solutions of acids 
and bases. Freshmen; lectures, 2 hours; laboratory, 2 hours. Credit, 3. 

Associate Professor Peters, Assistant Professor Anderson, 

Mr. Bogue and Graduate Assistants. 

2. General Chemistry. — The Metals. — A continuation of Course 1. 
A study of the metals and their compounds. The laboratory work takes the 
synthetic form. Substances of agricultural importance are prepared in 
quantity and studied in detail by the student. These include ammonium 
sulfate from gas liquor, sulfur and arsenic insecticides and superphos- 
phates, in addition to preparations outlined in Blanchard's " Synthetic 
Inorganic Chemistry." Attention is paid to the subjects of mass action 
and colloids. Prerequisite, Course 1. Freshmen; lectures, 2 hours; lab- 
oratory, 2 hours. Credit, 3. 

Associate Professor Peters, Assistant Professor Anderson, 

Mr. Bogue and Graduate Assistants. 

1 Absent on leave, second semester ; courses in charge of Associate Professor Peters. 



58 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [Jan. 



Elective Courses. 

3. Qualitative Analysis. — Basic. — A course in the systematic analy- 
sis of metallic salts, presented from the ionic viewpoint. The student 
studies closely the tests used in the separation and identification of the 
metals; he then applies these tests to unknown mixtures. Text, Gooch and 
Browning's " Outlines of Qualitative Analysis," with Bottger's " Qualita- 
tive Analysis " and Treadwell-Hall's " Qualitative Analysis " for reference. 
Prerequisite, Course 2; should be taken, particularly, by all intending to 
follow chemistry as a vocation. Sophomores; lecture, 1 hour; laboratory, 2 
hours. Credit, 3. Assistant Professor Anderson and Mr. Noyes. 

4. Qualitative Analysis. — Acidic. — A continuation of Course 3. A 
large part of the semester is spent in the examination qualitatively of 
minerals and of agricultural products. Prerequisite, Course 3. Sopho- 
mores; lecture, 1 hour; laboratory, 2 hours. Credit, 3. 

Assistant Professor Anderson and Mr. JNToyes. 

5. Organic Chemistry. — This course, with Course 6, continues through 
the junior year. The two courses are designed especially: (1) for those 
who are looking forward to positions as chemists in agricultural colleges 
or experiment stations, the United States Department of Agriculture, or 
similar places, and who need a knowledge of chemistry for itself; and 
(2) for those who are expecting to enter like positions in other sciences, 
and who will use their knowledge of chemistry in a secondary way. It 
consists of a systematic study, both from texts and in the laboratory, of 
the more important compounds in the entire field of organic chemistry. 
Especial attention is given to those compounds which are found in agri- 
cultural products or are manufactured from them. These include alcohols, 
acids, esters, fats, carbohydrates, proteins, etc. The work forms a founda- 
tion for courses in physiological chemistry and agricultural analysis, and 
thus for future work in agricultural chemical investigation. Prerequisites, 
Courses 1, 2, 3 and 4 (courses 3 and 4 will not be required as prerequisites 
for those majoring in other courses than chemistry). Juniors; those elect- 
ing Course 5 are expected to elect Course 6. Lectures, 3 hours ; laboratory, 
4 hours. Credit, 5. 

Associate Professor Chamberlain and Mr. Fowler. 

6. As stated under Course 5. 

7. Agricultural Chemistry. — This course and Course 8 are designed 
as alternatives for Courses 5 and 6. They are especially intended for 
those who, having completed Courses 1 and 2, do not care to continue the 
study of chemistry ' for itself, but are planning to enter practical agri- 
cultural work and desire a further knowledge of chemistry as it is re- 
lated directly to practical agriculture and agricultural problems. The 
work is planned in two parts, viz. : Course 7, Inorganic Agricultural Chem- 
istry, the study of the general composition, properties and reactions of 
soils and fertilizers, and in addition to this the study of some of the 



1913.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 59 

more important fungicides and insecticides, and the common materials 
of construction, such as tile, brick, cements, paints, oils, etc.; and Course 
8, Organic Agricultural Chemistry, the study of the composition, physiolog- 
ical processes, uses and nutritive value of plants, and the composition 
and general processes of nutrition and growth of animals; also the study 
of products related to plants and animals, such as milk, butter, sugar, 
maple syrup, denatured alcohol, wood pulp, paper, etc. The treatment of 
the subject in both of these courses is entirely general, avoiding all com- 
plicated chemical facts and relationships, and endeavoring simply to make 
the student acquainted with the chemical aspects of agricultural processes 
and products. Prerequisites, Courses 1 and 2. Juniors; those electing 
Course 7 are expected to elect Course 8. Lectures, 2 hours ; laboratory, 
2 hours. Credit, 3. 

Associate Professor Chamberlain and Mr. Fowler. 

8. Organic Agricultural Chemistry. — As stated under Course 7. 

9. Quantitative Analysis. — Instruction in this course includes the 
gravimetric and volumetric determinations of some of the commoner metals 
and non-metals in minerals and industrial products. Aside from teaching 
accurate observation and care in manipulation, it is intended for those 
who would learn the exact methods for determining the elements, particu- 
larly, in inorganic substances, and is the forerunner of other courses in- 
tended to fit men to become expert analysts. Talbot's " Quantitative 
Chemical Analysis " is used as a text. Prerequisites, Courses 1, 2, 3 and 4. 
Juniors; lecture, 1 hour; laboratory, 8 hours. Credit, 5. 

Professor Wellington and Associate Professor Peters. 

10. Agricultural Chemical Analysis. — In this course and Course 
11 the methods previously studied, and other approved methods, are 
applied to the examination of agricultural materials. The analysis of 
fertilizers, insecticides, fungicides and soils is followed by that of cattle 
foods, dairy products, sugars, starches and allied substances. Prerequisite, 
Course 9. Juniors; lecture, 1 hour; laboratory, 8 hours. Credit, 5. 

Professor Wellington, Associate Professor Peters. 

11. Agricultural Chemical Analysis. — As stated under Course 10. 
Prerequisite, Course 10. Seniors; lecture, 1 hour; laboratory, 8 hours. 
Credit, 5. Professor Wellington and Assistant. 

13. Physiological Chemistry. — This course is intended to be sup- 
plementary to Courses 5 and 6 and Courses 7 and 8. To those who ex- 
pect to take up scientific work in botany, agronomy, animal husbandry and 
bacteriology, and who have had Courses 5 and 6, it will give acquaintance 
with the chemistry of the physiological processes in plants and animals, 
by means of which some of the important organic compounds studied in 
Courses 5 and 6 are built up in the living organism or are used as food 
by it. In the lectures the study of food and nutrition as related to both 
human and domestic animals is the principal subject. In the laboratory, 



60 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [Jan. 

experimental studies are made of the animal body and the processes and 
products of digestion, secretion and excretion. The course gives additional 
training in the chemical problems of agricultural experiment station work, 
especially those connected with investigations in animal and plant nutri- 
tion. To those who will not take up scientific lines of work, but will 
follow practical agriculture, it will give an opportunity for a more detailed 
study of the chemistry and physiology of problems which were treated 
generally in Courses 7 and 8. Prerequisites, preferably, Courses 5 and 6 or 
7 and 8. Seniors; lectures, 2 hours; laboratory, 2 hours. Credit, 3. 
Associate Professor Chamberlain and Mr. Fowler. 

[General Statement concerning Courses 12, 14 and 16. — Each student 
electing either of these courses will be required to take up and follow out some 
special line of work, the object being to acquaint him with methods of original 
inquiry. A single concrete example may be found in a comparative study of the 
different methods for the determination of the several forms of nitrogen. A thesis 
may not be required, but frequent consultation of the literature bearing on the sub- 
ject will be necessary. These courses are valuable for all chemists, and particularly 
so for those intending to take up experiment station work. A student may choose 
any one but not two of these separate courses.] 

12. Special Work in Agricultural Chemical Analysis. — Topics for 
laboratory study will be assigned to each student. Prerequisite, Course 11. 
Seniors; laboratory, 10 hours. Credit, 5. 

Professor Wellington and Assistant. 

14. Special Work in Physiological and Organic Agricultural Chem- 
istry. — In this course, as in Courses 12 and 16, the student will be able 
to give his attention primarily to one line of chemical study. To those 
whose tastes and interests are in connection with the organic and physio- 
logical problems of agricultural chemistry, many subjects of study present 
themselves, among which may be mentioned: proteins, carbohydrates, fats, 
organic nitrogenous compounds in fertilizers and soils and their relation 
to plants, the commercial production of alcohol from agricultural products, 
digestion and dietary studies, etc. Prerequisites, Courses 5, 6 and 13. 
Seniors; laboratory, 10 hours. Credit, 5. 

Associate Professor Chamberlain and Mr. Fowler. 

16. Special Work in Physical Chemistry. — The field of agricultural 
chemistry offers many problems that have been attacked through the 
methods of physical chemistry; such, for example, are the hydrolysis of 
salts and of minerals and the absorption of salts and fertilizers by soils. 
Each student will select one line of work and follow it through the course, 
repeating some of the original work. Prerequisite, Course 15. Laboratory, 
10 hours. Credit, 5. Assistant Professor Anderson. 

15. Physical Chemistry. — A resume of general chemistry from the 
viewpoint of physical chemistry and the application of physical chemistry 
to agricultural chemistry. Prerequisite, Course 9. Juniors and seniors; 
lectures, 2 hours; laboratory, 2 hours. Credit, 3. 

Assistant Professor Anderson. 



1913.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 61 

18. History of Chemistry. — An exposition of the development of 
chemical knowledge from the earliest times to the present. Although the 
entire history will be included, the larger portion of it will receive only- 
brief mention in order that the questions of vital interest in modern life 
and industry may be studied at more length. Particular attention will be 
given to the questions of plant and animal industry. Chemists are strongly 
advised to take this course. [Not given in 1912-13.] Seniors; lectures, 2 
hours. Credit, 2. Professor Wellington. 

ENTOMOLOGY. 

Professor Feenald, Associate Professor Crampton, Assistant Professor Gates, Mr. 
Martin, Mr. Davis. 

Elective Courses. 

1. General and Economic Entomology. — Course 1 comprises a general 
introduction to the study of insects, including studies on their structure as 
applied to their identification; the principles of classification; a systematic 
examination of the different groups and of the most important economic 
insects of each group, including their life histories and habits, recognition 
of their work as shown in the collections, and methods for their control. 
The most important insecticides and their preparation and application are 
also treated. Students electing Course 1 are expected to take Course 2. 
Juniors; 3 lecture periods. Credit, 3. Professor Fernald. 

2. General and Economic Entomology. — A continuation of Course 1, 
with laboratory and field work on methods of collecting, preserving and 
studying insects and their work. Juniors; 2 laboratory or field periods. 
Credit, 3. Professor Fernald. 

3. Advanced Entomology. — This course is subdivided, the time spent 
on the various subdivisions differing somewhat according to the particular 
needs of those taking it; and it is to a large degree given in the form 
of individual instruction, special attention being paid to the pests attack- 
ing the particular crops in which the student is most interested. The 
student may specialize in fruit pests, market-garden pests, greenhouse 
pests, field crop pests, etc., to a large extent, in accordance with his 
plans for future work. 

A. Morphology. — Careful studies of the structure of insects belonging 
to each of the larger and more important orders, together with lectures on 
the subject, followed by the identification of insects of each of these 
groups and the study of the collections, to teach the use of the analytical 
tables and of structural characters in the determination of insects. 

B. Histology. — Lectures on the internal anatomy and histology of the 
various organs, with particular reference to those affected by the various 
insecticides. 

C. Insecticides and Apparatus. — Lectures on the chemistry, prepara- 
tion and application of the different insecticides, their merits and defects; 
tests for detecting adulterations; comparative tests of nozzles and other 
apparatus; and a study of other methods of insect control, together with 
laboratory work. 



62 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [Jan. 

D. Coceidology. — Laboratory work on methods of preserving, mounting 
and identifying scale insects, particular attention being given to those of 
greatest economic importance. 

E. Bibliography. — Studies of the various entomological publications 
and of the methods of finding the literature on any insect. 

F. Special Studies. — In these studies the insects most closely related 
to the future occupation of the student will receive attention. The results 
of these studies are brought together in the form of an essay or thesis; 
this will include all the essentials of what is known of the life history, 
habits and injuries caused by each insect studied, together with methods 
of treatment, and a list of the best articles found in the course of the 
work. Comstoek's " Manual for the Study of Insects " is used in the 
laboratory work. Seniors; prerequisite, Entomology 2; students electing 
Course 3 are expected to take Course 4; 1 1-hour lecture period and 3 
2-hour laboratory or field periods. Credit, 4. 

Professor Fernald, Associate Professor Crampton, Mr. Martin. 

4. Advanced Entomology. — As stated in Course 3. Prerequisite, Course 
3. 

5. Forest Insects. — A study of insects injurious to forest trees and of 
methods for their control, with laboratory and field work on these insects, 
and a study of what has been published about them. Seniors; prereq- 
uisites, Entomology 1 and 2; 1 lecture and 2 2-hour laboratory or field 
exercises. Credit, 3. Professor Fernald. 

8. Beekeeping. — This course comprises a general consideration of the 
biology of the honey bee and of practical beekeeping. Some topics covered 
are : phylogeny, life history, general behavior and instincts, structure, 
products, relations of bees to plants and the honey flora. The course aims 
particularly to afford first-hand, practical experience with bees, to the end 
of enabling their proper maintenance for any purpose, horticultural, educa- 
tional or apicultural. Bee diseases, a thorough understanding of which 
is fundamental to the industry, are considered. So far as possible the 
work is made individual in constructing materials and apparatus. Juniors; 
seniors may elect. Courses 1 and 2 form a desirable preparation; 2 lec- 
tures; 1 2-hour laboratory period. Credit, 3. 

Assistant Professor Gates, Mr. Davis. 

[10. 1 Advanced Beekeeping. — This course deals with the advanced and 
special problems of the beekeeper. Besides considering those difficulties 
which at present confront the industry, subjects necessarily of limited 
treatment in the previous course are expanded for the development of 
particular technique and manipulation. Apiary management and the 
principles of queen rearing are practiced in accord with the season. The 
course should further qualify for apicultural instruction, inspection service, 
and afford familiarity with the special literature and method needed in 
investigation and research. The policy of individual instruction will be 

1 The announcement of this course is made provisionally. 



1913.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 63 

contained in so far as practicable. Primarily for seniors, but juniors 
may. elect; prerequisite, Course 8; 1 lecture, 1 laboratory period. Credit, 
2. Assistant Professor Gates.] 

MATHEMATICS AND CIVIL ENGINEERING. 

Professor Osteandee, Mr. Duncan, Mr. Machmee, Mr. Paesons. 
Required Courses. 

1. Higher Algebra. — A brief review of radicals, quadratic equations, 
ratio and proportion, and progressions; graphs, binomial theorem, un- 
determined coefficients, summation of series, continued fractions, deter- 
minants, permutations and combinations, logarithms, theory of equations. 
Reitz and Crathorne's "College Algebra." Freshmen; 3 hours a week. 
Credit, 3. Mr. Machmer and Mr. Parsons. 

2. Higher Algebra. — As stated under Course 1. 

Mr. Machmer. 

3. Solid Geometry. — Theorems and exercises on the properties of 
straight lines and planes, dihedral and polyhedral angles, prisms, pyramids 
and regular solids; cylinders, cones and spheres; spherical triangles and the 
measurement of surfaces and solids. Wentworth and Smith's " Solid 
Geometry." Freshmen; required unless accepted for admission; 2 hours 
a week. Credit, 2. Mr. Duncan. 

4. Plane Trigonometry (in Charge of Department of Physics). — The 
trigonometric functions as lines and ratios; proofs of the principal for- 
mulas, transformations; inverse functions, use of logarithms; the applica- 
tions to the solution of right and oblique triangles; practical applications. 
Bowser's " Elements of Plane and Spherical Trigonometry." Required unless 
accepted for admission. Freshmen; 3 hours. Credit, 3. 

Professor Hasbrouck and Captain Martin. 

Elective Courses. 

6. Plaxe Surveying. — The elements of the subject, including the ad- 
justment and use of the usual instruments. Text-book and lectures. 
Sophomores; 6 hours a week. Credit, 3. 

Mr. Duncan and Mr. Parsons. 

7. Analytic Geometry. — A discussion of the geometry of the line, the 
circle, of conic sections and of the higher plane curves. Fine and Thomp- 
son's "Coordinate Geometry." Prerequisites, Mathematics 1, 2, 3 and 4. 
Primarily for juniors; 3 hours a week. Credit, 3. 

Professor Ostrander. 

8. Differential and Integral Calculus. — A first course in the sub- 
ject, with some of the more important applications. Nichol's " Differential 
and Integral Calculus." Prerequisites, Mathematics 1, 2, 3, 4 and 7. 
Primarily for juniors; 5 hours. Credit, 5. Professor Ostrander. 



64 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [Jan. 

10. Advanced Surveying. — Topographic and higher surveying, high- 
way construction, earthwork, pavements and railroad construction. [Not 
given in 1912-13.] Text-book and lectures; 6 hours. Credit, 5. 

Professor Ostrander. 

11. Hydraulics and Sanitary Engineering. — Hydrostatics, theoretical 
hydraulics, orifices, weirs, pipes, conduits, water supply, hydraulic motors, 
sewers and sewage treatment. [Not given in 1912-13.] Text-book and 
lectures; 3 hours. Credit, 3. Professor Ostrander. 

12. Elementary Structures. — An elementary course in roofs and 
bridges. Text-book and lectures; 6 hours. [Not given in 1913-14.] 
Credit, 5. Professor Ostrander. 

13. Materials of Construction, Foundations and Masonry Con- 
struction. — Text -book and lectures; 4 hours. [Not given in 1913-14.] 
Credit, 3. Professor Ostrander. 

15. Applied Mechanics. — A course in applied mechanics, based on the 
calculus, with problems. Text-books and lectures. Prerequisites, Mathe- 
matics 7, 10; 3 hours. Credit, 3. Professor Ostrander. 

MICROBIOLOGY. 

Professor Marshall. 

[The program of courses in the recently established department of microbiology- 
has not been completed. Work will be outlined in pathology, bacteriology, etc., but 
only the course in dairy bacteriology (Dairying 3) has yet been offered.] 

3. Dairy Bacteriology. — A study of bacteriology relative to market 
milk and dairy work. Prerequisites, Courses 1 and 2, and Bacteriology 1 
(see Veterinary science) ; 3 2-hour laboratory periods. Credit, 3. 

Professor Marshall. 

PHYSICS. 

Professor Hasbrotjck, Captain Martin, Mr. Butman. 

[The fundamental and basic importance of the laws and phenomena of physics 
makes necessary no explanation of the introduction of this subject into the curric- 
ulum of an agricultural college. The logical development of the subject emphasizes 
the importance of physics as a science in itself. Special emphasis is laid, however, 
on the correlation of the principles studied with the sciences of agriculture, botany, 
chemistry, zoology, thus furnishing an extra tool by use of which the student's work 
in all the subjects may be more effective.] 

Required Course. 
1. General Physics. — General physics covers mechanics of solids, 
mechanics of fluids, wave motion and heat. These topics are chosen for 
the required work because they are regarded as the most fundamental of 
all, and there is no part of the work in physics more necessary for the 
student who plans to take up practical farming. Course given by text- 
book and lectures. Sophomores; 4 hours' class-room work and 1 labora- 
tory period. Credit, 5. Professor Hasbrouck and Mr. Butman. 



1913.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 65 



Elective Courses. 

2. General Physics. — Electricity and light. Text -book, lectures, reci- 
tations and laboratory work. Sophomores; 2 hours of class-room work 
and 1 laboratory period. Credit, 3. Mr. Butman. 

3. Optical Instruments and Light. — Three-hour lecture course open 
to juniors and seniors; 3 hours. Credit, 3. Mr. Butman. 

4. Electricity and Heat. — Three-hour lecture and laboratory course 
open to juniors and seniors; 3 hours. Credit, 3. Mr. Butman. 

[Mathematics 4 (trigonometry) is, for convenience of grouping, listed 
under Mathematics, although in charge of the Department of Physics.] 

VETERINARY SCIENCE. 

Professor Paige, Assistant Professor Gage. 

" [The courses in veterinary science have been arranged to meet the needs of stu- 
dents who purpose following practical agriculture, and of prospective students of 
human and comparative medicine.] 

Elective Courses. 1 

1. Introductory Bacteriology. — The object of this course is to acquaint 
the student with the various organisms found in air, water, soil, milk and 
the body, and with the relation of these organisms to such processes as 
decomposition, fermentation and digestion, and to the production of disease. 
Toxic substances resulting from the growth of organisms, and the anti- 
toxins used to counteract their action, are considered. Lectures, recitations 
and laboratory work. Seniors; 3 2-hour laboratory exercises. Credit, 3. 

Professor Paige and Assistant Professor Gage. 

2. Bacteriology. — A continuation of Course 1, taking up more advanced 
problems. 

3. Veterinary Science. — A course treating of veterinary hygiene, com- 
parative anatomy and general pathology; veterinary materia medica and 
therapeutics; the theory and practice of veterinary medicine; general, 
special and operative surgery; and veterinary bacteriology and parasitology. 
Lectures, clinics, demonstrations and laboratory exercises. Must be fol- 
lowed by Course 4. Seniors; 5 hours. Credit, 5. Professor Paige. 

4. Veterinary Science. — As stated under Course 3. 

1 Revision of the plan of courses, to be in effect in 1913-14, is announced. 



66 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [Jan. 



ZOOLOGY AND GEOLOGY. 

Associate Professor Gordon, Mr. Paekee. 

Zoology. 
Required Course. 

1. Animal Morphology. — This course presents the underlying prin- 
ciples of biology and the zoological part of an introductory course. Labora- 
tory dissection and lectures. Sophomores; 1 lecture hour and 2 2-hour 
laboratory periods. Credit, 3. Associate Professor Gordon. 

Elective Courses. 

3. Comparative Invertebrate or Vertebrate Zoology. — These are 
parallel courses running throughout the year and are scheduled for the 
same hour. The student may elect one or the other, but not both in the 
same year. Comparative invertebrate zoology is intended primarily for 
future students in entomology, but is open to any one. Vertebrate zoology 
presents the comparative morphology of vertebrate forms. Parker & 
Haswell's " Text-book of Zoology," Vol. I., is required for invertebrate 
zoology, and Vol. II. for vertebrate zoology. Primarily for juniors; pre- 
requisite for these courses, Course 1, or its equivalent; 1 lecture hour and 
2 2-hour laboratory periods. Credit, 3. Associate Professor Gordon. 

4. Comparative Invertebrate or Vertebrate Zoology. — Continuation 
of Course 3. One lecture hour and 2 2-hour laboratory periods. Credit, 3. 

Associate Professor Gordon. 

5. Advanced Zoology. 1 — A course in animal parasites is offered to 
seniors. This course is a survey of this special field, with laboratory dis- 
section, lecture work and outside reading. Not open to fewer than three 
students. Prerequisites, Course 1 and Course 3 in comparative invertebrate 
zoology; 2 1-hour periods, or their equivalent and 3 2-hour periods. 
Credit, 5. Associate Professor Gordon. 

6. Advanced Zoology. 1 — Course 5, continued. One 1-hour period and 
2 2-hour periods. Credit, 3. Associate Professor Gordon. 

Graduate Courses. — See " Graduate School." 

Geology. 
Elective Course. 

2. Elementary Geology. — Rock-forming minerals; rock types; rock 
weathering; dynamical, structural and surface geology. Lectures, map and 
field work. Sophomores; 1 1-hour period and 2 2-hour periods. Credit, 3. 

Associate Professor Gordon. 

1 Courses 5 and 6 are also available as a minor for the degrees of master of science 
or doctor of philosophy. 



1913.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 67 



DIVISION OF THE HUMANITIES. 

Professor Sprague. 

ECONOMICS AND SOCIOLOGY. 

Professor Sprague. 

"Required Course. 

1. Political Economy. — An introductory course. A study of the 
nature and scope of economics; the evolution and organization of the 
present economic system, the principles of production, exchange and con- 
sumption. This course will take up such topics as value, rentals, popula- 
tion, labor and its problems, capital, interest and profits, systems and 
factors of production, tariffs and commerce. Students will be called upon 
to analyze industrial plants in actual operation. Text-books, lectures and 
general discussions; a required course, but it may be taken in either junior 
or senior year; 3 hours. Credit, 3. Professor Sprague. 

Elective Courses. 

2. Industrial Problems. — A course in the most important industrial 
problems of the day, covering the methods of organizations of labor and 
capital, systems of industrial remuneration, means of securing industrial 
peace, legal status of labor unions and their activities, protective legisla- 
tion for workmen and employers, the problems of immigration, the sweated 
industries, prison labor, child labor and industrial education. Text-book, 
with collateral readings, lectures and discussions; 3 hours. Credit, 3. 

Professor Sprague. 

3. Social Institutions and Social Problems. — This course is de- 
voted to the study of the social institutions, such as the family, the 
church, State and property; and to such current social problems as 
divorces, race suicide, crime and prison reform, poverty and its relief, 
social effects of low wages, child labor, overwork, immigration and con- 
gestion of population. The later weeks of the semester will be given to 
a short introduction to sociological theory. The correctional and charitable 
institutions of Massachusetts will be studied in considerable detail. Head- 
ings, lectures, papers; 3 hours. Credit, 3. Professor Sprague. 

4. Modern Social Eeform Movements. — The history of property and 
its vital issues in modern times. The socialistic systems, anarchy and com- 
munism. Systems of workingmen's insurance in Europe and America, and 
other methods of relief from the chances of life. Educational reforms, in 
process, to meet the demands of a new age, and legislative remedies for 
the evils of social change and maladjustment. The crisis of Christianity 
under modern capitalized industrialism. These topics indicate the nature 
of the subjects studied. This course follows Economics 3. Three hours. 
Credit, 3. Professor Sprague. 



68 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [Jan. 

5. Public Finance, Money and Banking. — This course follows Eco- 
nomics 1. It will take up taxation and the various systems for collecting 
public revenue in Europe and America, with the problems involved ; the history 
of money and the systems of banking and finance now in operation; the 
causes and problems of economic crises and depressions; the currency prob- 
lems of the United States. Eeadings, lectures and discussions; 3 hours. 
Credit, 3. Professor Sprague. 

6. Economic Histoey. — This course will be divided between the eco- 
nomic history of Europe and that of America. An outline history will be 
followed with special study of selected epochal periods and important 
topics. Three hours. Credit, 3. Professor Sprague. 

8. Anthropology; the History of Human Civilization. — The evolu- 
tionary origin and history of man; characteristics of primitive men, de- 
parture from the animal status, and the beginnings of civilization; 
development of industries, arts and sciences; the growth of languages, 
warfare, migrations and social institutions; a study of the powerful 
natural and human forces that have brought man from the early stages to 
modern conditions, will constitute the subject matter of the course. Three 
hours. Credit, 3. Professor Sprague. 

HISTORY AND GOVERNMENT. 

Associate Professor Eyerly, Mr. Holcomb. 

Elective Courses. 

1. Elements op Political Science. — Nature and scope of political 
science; origin and evolution of the State; systems of government in the 
principal European States; organization and working of the national and 
of the State governments of the United States; relation of government to 
political parties and to public opinion; the functions of government as 
related to labor and commerce. Three hours. Credit, 3. 

Associate Professor Eyerly. 

2. Local Political Institutions. — A comparative study of the or- 
ganization, functions and achievements of country and city groups, espe- 
cially as these are concerned with such matters as taxation, finance, 
licenses, franchises, public ownership, highways, transportation and com- 
munication, water supply, fire protection, public lighting, markets, food 
inspection, garbage and sewage disposal, infectious diseases, housing con- 
ditions, police force, parks and playgrounds, libraries, schools, care of 
dependents. Three hours. Credit, 3. Associate Professor Eyerly. 

3. The History of New England. — In this course, New England is 
regarded as a unit. Although the history of agriculture and rural life 
is treated with special fulness, ample attention is given to political, reli- 
gious and ethical history. It is hoped that the student will not only be 
led to an intelligent understanding of present economic conditions, but 
will also be imbued with a progressive loyalty to the highest ideals of 
the New England of the past. Lectures and required reading; 3 hours. 
Credit, 3. Mr. Holcomb. 



1913.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 69 

5. The History of Ideals. — This course treats history from the ideal- 
istic rather than from the economic, point of view. It attempts to define 
the great ideals which have impelled some of the most important social, 
political, esthetic, scientific, ethical and religious movements of medieval 
and modern history, and to trace the causes of the success or failure of 
the movements to which these ideals have led. Christianity, including 
monasticism, modern Catholicism and Protestantism; medieval art and 
architecture; the modern scientific movement; and social and political de- 
mocracy will be treated historically from this point of view. Lectures and 
reading; 3 hours. Credit, 3. Mr. Holcomb. 

LANGUAGES AND LITERATURE. 

Professor Mills. 

LANGUAGES AND LITERATURE: ENGLISH, JOURNALISM AND PUBLIC 

SPEAKING. 

Associate Professor Neal, Professor Lewis, Assistant Professor Smith, Mr. Wat- 
tles, Mr. Prince, Miss Goessmann. 

English. 
Required Courses. 
1, 2. Freshman English. — Composition; introduction to literature. 
Eecitations, laboratory practice and lectures; theme writing; conferences. 
Text-book and laboratory manual, NeaPs " Thought-building in Compo- 
sition." Ereshmen; 4 hours. Credit, 4. 

Associate Professor Neal, Assistant Professor Smith, Mr. Wattles, 

Mr. Prince. 

3, 4. Sophomore English. — Composition; literature. Prerequisite, 
Courses 2 and 3 respectively; sophomores; 2 hours. Credit, 2. 

Professor Lewis and Miss Goessmann. 

Elective Courses in English Language and Literature. 

7. Expository Writing. — The principles of exposition, with exercises 
in composition. Subjects will be largely found in current events and con- 
temporary thought, and treated editorially. A foundation course in more 
advanced composition, primarily for juniors but open to seniors; advised 
for those who plan to take Course 8. First given in 1912-13. Two hours, 
with a third hour at the option of the instructor. Credit, 2. 

Mr. Wattles. 

8. Expository Writing. — The principles of exposition with especial 
reference to technical writing, including the writing of bulletins; some 
attention also to the more popular exposition of scientific facts. Primarily 
for juniors but open to seniors. First offered in 1912-13. Two hours, 
with a third hour at the option of the instructor. Credit, 2. 

Mr. Wattles. 

9. 10. Cultural Beading. — Not given in 1912-13. 



70 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [Jan. 

13. English Writers and Thought. — Studies, laboratory problems, 
readings, and reports in some period of English literature. Three hours. 
Credit, 3. Assistant Professor Smith. 

14. English Writers and Thought. — 'As in Course 13. Three hours. 
Credit, 3. 

15. Prose Masters op the Nineteenth Century. — A sympathetic 
study of the writings of Ruskin, Carlyle, Newman, Arnold and Stevenson. 
Junior and senior course; 3 hours. Credit, 3. Professor Lewis. 

16. Poets of the Victorian Age: Browning, Tennyson and Arnold. 
— This course will deal especially with the ethical and religious ideals of 
these poets as expressed in their most serious poems. Junior and senior 
course; 3 hours. Credit, 3. Professor Lewis. 

17. Advanced Composition and Literature. — The reading and study 
of writings that are typical of literary style or form, especially in descrip- 
tion and narration, and the writing of exercises involving problems of the 
same general sort as those illustrated by the readings. A good deal of 
fiction will probably be read, of which more or less will be found in the 
novels and short stories of our own day. On this study will be based the 
work in composition. Primarily for seniors but open to juniors. Two 
hours, with a third hour at the option of the instructor. Credit, 2. 

Associate Professor Neal. 

18. Advanced Literature. — This course varies from year to year. It 
will usually provide opportunity either for intensive study of great writers 
or for study of the historical development or the structure and charac- 
teristics of literary types. Three hours. Credit, 3. 

Associate Professor Neal. 

Journalism. 

[The courses in journalism emphasize rural journalism. They aim to acquaint the 
student with the elementary problems and theory of journalism as a profession or 
vocation, and to exercise him, as far as conditions permit, in the commoner aspects 
of journalistic work, such as news-gathering, news-writing, desk-editing and editorial 
writing. By rural journalism is meant the application of journalistic principles in 
getting and suitably presenting material adapted to the non-urban rather than to 
the urban or metropolitan reader, so far as their interests are distinct. This includes 
agricultural journalism, but is by no means confined to that. Members of the classes 
supply, under the head " The Bay State Ruralist," a feature page for the " Spring- 
field Sunday Union." Members of all classes may be required to turn in copy regu- 
larly for such disposition as the instructor may determine, and must have free time 
for covering stories. Students wishing to proceed beyond elementary study are 
urged to consult with the instructor before making their election in other subjects 
for the junior-senior years, in order that the most helpful program of work may be 
arranged.] 

Elective Courses. 
1. Introduction to Journalism. — The foundation conceptions and 
aims of journalism; practice in the simple forms of journalistic writing. 
Prerequisite to all other work in journalism, and valuable also to students 



1913.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 71 

preparing for practical farming, agricultural or general science, rural edu- 
cation, etc., as a vocation. Two hours, with a third hour at option of the 
instructor. Credit, 2. 

Associate Professor Neal, Assistant Professor Smith. 

2. Keporting. — News-gathering and news-writing. This includes the 
gathering and presentation of industrial and agricultural information, 
campus news or other stories, as may be directed. , Courses 1 and 2 are 
the foundation courses in journalism. Students admitted to 2 who have 
not had 1 will be required to do extra work. Two hours, with a third 
hour at the option of the instructor. Credit, 2. 

Associate Professor Neal. 

3. Journalistic Practice. — The gathering and preparation of material 
for publication. The class may be organized as a staff. Prerequisite, 
course 1 or its equivalent. Two hours, with a third hour at the option of 
the instructor. Credit, 2. Associate Professor Neal. 

4. Journalistic Practice. — As stated under Course 3. 

5. Advanced Journalistic Practice. — Informal ; students will be as- 
signed work as editorial assistants or writers, or otherwise employed in 
some form of journalistic activity. Study of particular forms of jour- 
nalistic writing, of special subjects and their journalistic presentation, of 
particular kinds of periodical, or of current topics may be directed, and 
the presentation of a thesis may be required. Hours to be arranged. Two 
hours. Credit, 1. Associate Professor Neal. 

6. Advanced Journalistic Practice. — As stated under Course 5. 

Public Speaking. 
Required Courses. 

1. Freshman Public Speaking. — Freshman public speaking is required 
in either the first or the second semester at the option of the instructor. 
The course is concerned with the actual problems which confront the man 
who would speak convincingly and persuasively. Some attention is given 
to breath control and development of speaking voice, considerable atten- 
tion to pronunciation and enunciation, and a large amount of attention to 
the preparation and delivery of extempore speeches. Text-book, Shurter's 
" Extempore Speaking," supplemented by lectures and discussions. Fresh- 
men; 1 hour. Credit, 1. Mr. Prince. 

2. Freshman Public Speaking. — As stated under Course 1. Eequired 
of all freshmen who are not assigned to take Course 1. 

8. Occasional Oratory. — Exercises for voice and gesture ; a study of 
the elements of vocal expression and action; speeches on assigned topics; 
prescribed reading; the preparation and delivery of a formal oration or 
two. It is especially recommended for those who desire to enter the Flint 
contest. Two hours. Credit, 2. Assistant Professor Smith. 



72 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [Jan. 



LANGUAGES AND LITERATURE: GERMAN. 

Assistant Professor Ashley, Mr. Julian. 

'Required Courses. 

1. Elementary German. — Grammar and composition ; the reading of 
short stories, poems, plays, etc. Especial attention is given to oral ques- 
tioning and answering in German, and to translation of English into Ger- 
man. Eequired of those presenting French for entrance who do not con- 
tinue that language and have not studied German. Freshmen; open upon 
arrangement to other students; 4 hours. Credit, 4. Mr. Julian. 

2. Elementary German. — As stated under Course 1. Prerequisite, 
Course 1. 

3. Intermediate German. — Eapid reading of selected works from 
Schiller, Goethe, Lessing and others; review of grammar and dictation in 
German; outside readings. Eequired of freshmen who present German for 
entrance and do not take French. Freshmen; open upon arrangement to 
other students; 4 hours. Credit, 4. Assistant Professor Ashley. 

3A. Intermediate German. — Eapid reading of prose works, such as 

Sudermann's " Frau Sorge," and dramas, such as " Wilhelm Tell " and 

" Die Journalisten." Eequired of sophomores who took Courses 1 and 2 

as freshmen. Mr. Julian. 

4. Intermediate German. — As stated under Course 3. Prerequisite, 
Course 3. 

« 

4A. Intermediate German. — As stated under Course 3A. Open to 
students who have completed German 3A; 3 hours. Credit, 3. 

5. Advanced German. — Literary study of the classicists, — Schiller's 
" Wallenstein," Lessing's "Nathan der Weise," Goethe's "Iphigenia," etc.; 
collateral readings in German and class-room reports. Conducted in Ger- 
man. Prerequisite, Course 4. Sophomores; required of those who took 
German 3 and 4 as freshmen; open upon arrangement to other students; 
3 hours. Credit, 3. Assistant Professor Ashley. 

Elective Courses. 

6. Advanced German. — As stated under Course 5. Sophomores; open 
upon arrangement to other students. Prerequisite, Course 5; 3 hours. 
Credit, 3. Assistant Professor Ashley. 

7. Modern German. — Eeading of articles from the best modern Ger- 
man periodicals, such as "Ueber Land und Meer; " conversation and com- 
position work based on text. " Ferien in Deutschland," prepared by 
instructor; 3 hours. Credit, 3. Assistant Professor Ashley. 

8. Modern German. — As stated under Course 7. 



1913.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 73 

9. Scientific German. — Beading of modern magazine articles and 
works in German of a scientific nature. Different work assigned according 
to needs of individual students. Open to juniors who have completed 
Course 4 A or more advanced work. Three hours. Credit, 3. 

Assistant Professor Ashley. 

10. Scientific German. — As stated under Course 9. 

11. German Literature. — Advanced language and literary study. Con- 
ducted entirely in German. Lectures on German literature and history; 
life, customs and travel in Germany. Collateral readings, including mas- 
terpieces of different epochs, such as " Niebelungenlied," Goethe's " Faust/' 
and one modern typical drama. Prerequisite, Course 6 or 10. 

Assistant Professor Ashley. 

12. German Literature. — As stated under Course 11. 

LANGUAGES AND LITERATURE: FRENCH. 

Assistant Professor Mackimmie, Mr. Harmount. 

1, 2. Elementary French. — The essentials of grammar are rapidly 
taught. Thieme and Effinger's " French Grammar " will be used during 
the first semester. A large amount of reading is required. Eequired of 
freshmen presenting German for entrance who do not continue that lan- 
guage and have not studied French; open upon arrangement to other 
students. Freshmen; 4 hours. Credit, 4. Mr. Harmount. 

3. Intermediate French (third year). — Training for rapid reading; 
the reading of a number of short stories, novels and plays; composition; 
reports on collateral reading from periodicals and scientific texts in the 
library. Eequired of freshmen who present two years of French for en- 
trance and do not take German, and of sophomores who take Courses 1 
and 2 as freshmen; open upon arrangement to other students; 4 hours. 
Credit, 4. Assistant Professor Mackimmie, Mr. Harmount. 

4. Intermediate French. — As stated under Course 3, but not required 
of sophomores who take Courses 1 and 2 as freshmen. Prerequisite, Course 
3. Assistant Professor Mackimmie. 

5. Advanced French (fourth year). — A reading course; Balzac's "Eu- 
genie Grandet " and " Le Pere Goriot " and other masterpieces of the nine- 
teenth century; Brunetiere's " Honore de Balzac" and Harper's "Masters 
of French Literature; " readings in the library and written reports. Be- 

• quired of sophomores who take Courses 3 and 4 as freshmen; open upon 
arrangement to other students. Prerequisite, Course 4; 3 hours. Credit, 
3. Assistant Professor Mackimmie, Mr. Harmount. 

Elective Courses. 

6. Advanced French (fourth year). — A general view of the history of 
French literature; Kastner and Atkins' "History of French Literature." 
Several plays of the great classical dramatists will be read. Individual 



74 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [Jan. 

conferences on outside reading selected by the student. Prerequisite, 
Course 5. Sophomores; open upon arrangement to other students; 3 hours. 
Credit, 3. Assistant Professor Mackimmie. 

7, 8. Scientific French. — This course is planned to meet the require- 
ments of the individual student and aims to equip him with exact English 
equivalents for the French scientific terms in his particular science. Word 
lists of scientific terms will be required and also weekly readings and re- 
ports from scientific works in the subject in which he is majoring. Several 
scientific readers will be read. Three hours. Credit, 3. Mr. Hakmount. 

9, 10. Modern French Literature. — The outline is intended as a sug- 
gestion. The exact subject matter of the course will be determined when 
the men are enrolled. The object of this course is to give an introduction 
to recent movements in French literature. In the drama, readings from 
Augier, A. Dumas, fils, Delavigne; in the novel, from Flaubert, the de 
Goncourts, Zola; in criticism, from Taine, Kenan, Sainte-Beuve ; for the 
literary history of the period Lanson's " Histoire de la Litterature 
Francaise." Prerequisite, the required French. Juniors or seniors; 3 hours. 
Credit, 3. Assistant Professor Mackimmie. 

LANGUAGES AND LITERATURE: SPANISH. 

Assistant Professor Mackimmie. 
Elective Courses. 
1. Elementary Spanish. — Grammar, with special drill in pronuncia- 
tion; reading from a simple reader. Seniors or juniors; open upon arrange- 
ment to other students; 3 hours. Credit, 3. 

Assistant Professor Mackimmie. 

" 2. Modern Spanish Authors. — Beading from modern Spanish novel 
and drama. Prerequisites, Course 1. Seniors or juniors; open upon ar- 
rangement to other students; 3 hours. Credit, 3. 

Assistant Professor Mackimmie. 

LANGUAGES AND LITERATURE: MUSIC. 

Assistant Professor Ashley. 
Elective Courses. 

1. History and Interpretation op Music. — History of music among 
the ancients; medieval and secular music; epoch of vocal counterpoint; 
development of monophony opera and oratorio ; life and works of the great- 
est representatives of the classical school — Bach, Handel, Haydn, Gluck 
and Mozart. One hour. Credit, 1. Assistant Professor Ashley. 

2. History and Interpretation op Music. — A continuation of Course 
1. The Bomantic school; Beethoven, Schubert, Weber, Mendelssohn, 
Schumann, Chopin, Berlioz and Liszt; Wagner and the opera. The Modern 
school and Modern composers. One hour. Credit, 1. 

Assistant Professor Ashley. 



1913.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 75 



DIVISION OF RURAL SOCIAL SCIENCE. 

President Butterfield. 

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS. 

Associate Professor Cance. 
Eequired Courses. 
2. Agricultural Industry and Eesources. — A descriptive course 
dealing with agriculture as an industry and its relation to physiography, 
movement of population, supply of labor, commercial development, trans- 
portation, public authority and consumers' demand. The principal agri- 
cultural resources of the United States will be studied with reference to 
commercial importance, geographical distribution, present condition and 
means of increasing the value of the product and cheapening cost of pro- 
duction. Lectures, assigned readings, class topics and discussions. Sopho- 
mores; 3 hours. Credit, 3. Associate Professor Cance. 

Elective Courses. 

4. Elements of Agricultural Economics. — This course is designed 
to follow the required work in the elements of economics. It will con- 
sider the economic principles underlying the welfare and prosperity of the 
farmer and those institutions upon which his economic success depends; the 
economic elements in the production and distribution of agricultural wealth; 
means of exchange; determination of price; speculation; problems of 
land tenure and land values; taxation of land values; the maintenance of 
the economic status of the farmer; and the relation of the farmer to the 
State. Lectures, text, readings, topics and field work; 3 hours. Credit, 3. 

Associate Professor Cance. 

5. Historical and Comparative Agriculture. — Eecommended to 
students in journalism or education. A general survey of agriculture, 
ancient and modern; feudal and early English husbandry; the later de- 
velopment of English agriculture; the course of agriculture in the United 
States, with special emphasis on present conditions and the history of 
agriculture in New England. An attempt will be made to measure the 
influence of times, peoples and countries in producing different systems of 
agriculture, and to ascertain the causes now working to effect agricultural 
changes. Lectures, readings and library work. Seniors and juniors; open 
to other students upon arrangement; prerequisite, Course 4 or equivalent; 
3 hours. Credit, 3. Associate Professor Cance. 

6. Co-operation in Agriculture. — The course contemplates a some- 
what comprehensive view of the history, principles and business relations 
of agricultural organization for profit. (1) A survey of the development 
and progress, the methods and economic results, of the farmers' organiza- 
tions and great co-operative movements in the past; (2) the phases of 
business organization of agriculture abroad, and the present aspects and 



76 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [Jan. 

tendencies in the United States; (3) the principles underlying successful 
co-operative endeavor among farmers, and practical working plans for 
co-operative associations, with particular reference to the marketing of 
perishable products. Lectures, text, assigned reading and practical exer- 
cises; 2 or 3 hours. Credit, 2 or 3. Associate Professor Cance. 

7. Problems in Agricultural Economics. — An advanced course for 
students desirous of studying more intensively some of the problems im- 
mediately affecting the welfare of the farmer and society. Some of the 
problems that may be studied are : land problems, — land tenure, size of 
farms, causes affecting land values, private property in land, taxation 
of farm values, special problems, — cost of producing farm products, 
farm labor in New England, immigration, shifting of the rural popula- 
tion. Opportunity will be given, if practicable, for field work, and students 
will be encouraged to pursue lines of individual interest. Seniors and 
juniors; open upon arrangement to other students; enrollment subject to 
approval of instructor; 2 or 3 hours a week. Credit, 2 or 3. 

Associate Professor Cance. 

8. The Agricultural Market. — This course contemplates a study of 
the forces and conditions which determine the prices of farm products, and 
the mechanism, methods and problems concerned with transporting, storing 
and distributing them. Such topics as supply and demand, course of 
prices, transportation by freight, express and trolley, terminal facilities, 
the middleman system, speculation in agricultural products, protective leg- 
islation, the retail market, direct sales and the like will be taken up. The 
characteristics and possibilities of the New England market will be given 
special attention. Lectures, readings, assigned studies and field work. 
[Not offered in 1913-14.] Juniors and seniors; 2 or 3 hours a week. 
Credit, 2 or 3. Associate Professor Cance. 

9. Seminar. — Eesearch in agricultural economics and history : New 
England agriculture to 1860. Library work and reports. If desirable 
some other topic may be substituted. Hours to be arranged. Credit, 1. 

Associate Professor Cance. 

10. Seminar. — As stated in Course 9. 

AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION. 

Professor Hart, Associate Professor Morton. 
Elective Courses. 
1. Meaning of Education (Psychology). — A study of the develop- 
ment, structure and function of the nervous system with reference to the 
sense organs; relation of mind to the nervous system; growth and nature 
of mental processes; the activities of the mind in the process of learning. 
Text-book, lectures, discussion, and collateral readings and reports; 3 
hours. Credit, 3. Professor Hart. 



1913.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 77 

2. Vocational Education (History and Philosophy). — A survey of 
educational, religious and social movements with reference to their voca- 
tional aspects; the growth of educational institutions as influenced by 
science and industry. Lectures, collateral readings, reports, and a thesis 
on some phase of industrial education; 3 hours. Credit, 3. 

Professor Hart. 

3. Eural School Problems. — A study of agricultural education; the 
theory and practice of teaching; school organization and methods of 
instruction; the place and function of agriculture in the course of study. 
Primarily for those who have had Course 1 or 2; 2 hours. Credit, 2. 

Professor Hart. 

4. Eural School Problems. — Designed primarily for those who intend 
to teach; may be taken in connection with Course 3. The work consists of 
the selection and review of such parts of the courses in agriculture, horti- 
culture and the biological and physical sciences as are adapted to the work 
of the public schools; planning, and practical work in school gardens; 
decoration of school grounds; equipment and conduct of playgrounds. One 
lecture period, 2 two-hour laboratory periods. Credit, 3. 

Professor Hart, Associate Professor Morton. 

5. Seminar in Education. — For students who have had courses 1, 2 
and 3, or an equivalent. Topics that may be taken up for rather exhaus- 
tive study are: rural school supervision, and rural school surveys, and 
secondary school agriculture. Seniors and graduate students; 2 hours. 
Credit, 2. Professor Hart. 

6. Seminar in Education. — As stated under Course 5. 

RURAL SOCIOLOGY. 

Associate Professor Eyerly, President Butterpibld, Professor Hart, Mr. Holcomb. 

Elective Courses. 

2. The Eural Community. — A broad survey of the field of rural 
sociology, including such topics as the movements of the rural popula- 
tion, the social conditions and life of rural people, the influence of rural 
life, the description of the various social institutions of the rural community, 
an analysis of the fundamental problems of rural life, and the means of 
developing and redirecting the life of the rural community. Lectures, 
readings and essays on assigned topics; 3 hours. Credit, 3. 

President Butterfield and Associate Professor Eyerly. 

3. The Literature op Eural Life. — A critical and appreciative study 
of writers, both in prose and poetry, who have interpreted nature from the 
viewpoint of the lover of country life, and those who have idealized agri- 
culture, horticulture and other rural pursuits, together with those who have 
upheld as an ideal the development of a rural environment in cities; 3 
hours. Credit, 3. Mr. Holcomb. 



78 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [Jan. 

4. Eural Law. — The work of this course will cover such points as 
land titles, public roads, rights incident to ownership of live stock, eon- 
tracts, commercial paper and distinctions between personal and real 
property. Text, written exercises, lectures, and class discussions; 1 hour. 
Credit, 1. Professor Hart. 

5. The Sccial Conditions of the Eural People. — Composition of 
the rural population; vital statistics; nature, extent and causes of diseases 
and accidents; health agencies of control; extent and causes of delinquency 
and dependency; conditions of temperance, of sexual morality and family 
integrity; child labor; woman's work and position; relation of employer to 
employee; standard of living; size of family; cultural ideals; community 
consciousness and activity; standards of business conduct and of political 
ethics; 3 hours. Credit, 3. Associate Professor Eyerly. 

6. Sociological Aspects of Co-operation among Farmers. — An his- 
torical sketch of the origin, extent and success of co-operation among 
farmers in the various European countries and in the United States; per- 
sonal qualities and social conditions necessary to successful co-operative 
endeavor; the various forms of co-operative organization viewed in their 
industrial, intellectual and moral aspects; the influence of co-operation on 
the farmer's individualism, conservatism, self-help, thrift, contentment and 
on agrarian legislation, scientific agriculture and farm labor; the rela- 
tion of co-operation to neighborhood life, to community pride and loyalty, 
to further associated effort, to class stability, solidarity and status; the 
demand of co-operation for a new type of leadership; the relation of co- 
operation to socialism and the competitive system; 3 hours. Credit, 3. 
[Given in 1912-13; not given in 1913-14.] 

Associate Professor Eyerly. 

7. Eural Institutions. — A study of the organized agencies by which 
rural communities carry on their various forms of associated life; par- 
ticularly a study of the ways by which the domestic, economic, cultural, 
religious and political institutions contribute to rural betterment. Special 
attention given to the rural family and the rural church; 3 hours. Credit, 
3. Associate Professor Eyerly. 

8. The State and the Farmer. — A general survey of political organi- 
zations and movements among farmers in foreign countries and their in- 
fluence in shaping agrarian legislation; the character, extent and results 
of foreign State aid to the farming class; political movements among 
farmers in the United States; "Granger" legislation; relation of the 
Department of Agriculture, State boards of agriculture, agricultural col- 
leges and experiment stations, postal system, railway commissions, high- 
way commissions, public health agencies, etc., to rural welfare; 3 hours. 
Credit, 3. Associate Professor Eyerly. 

9. The Social Psychology of Eural Life. — Characteristics of the 
rural mind; character of hereditary and environmental influences; nature 
and effects of face-to-face groups; psychological effects of isolation, rela- 



1913.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 79 

tive security and freedom from strain; relation of contact with nature, of 
control over immediate environment, of family co-operation and of neigh- 
borhood life to self-control, self-expression, sympathy, service and leader- 
ship; nature and effects of fashion, conventionality and custom; character 
of discussion and public opinion, and their relation to class feeling and 
organization; relation of individualism, conservatism and homogeneity to 
crowd phenomena and progressive democracy; 3 hours. ' Credit, 3. 

Associate Professor Eyerly. 

10. Farmers' Organizations. — The history, purposes and achievements 
of the Grange, the Farmers' Union, farmers' clubs, village improvement 
associations, boys' clubs, etc.; the nature, scope, methods and history of 
local, State and national associations formed about some farm product or 
special farm interest, e.g., dairying, horticulture, stock breeding, forestry; 
their influence on " better farming, better business, better living ; " their 
influence in forming a class consciousness and in shaping legislation; need 
of federation; 3 hours. Credit, 3. Associate Professor Eyerly. 

11. Sociological Aspects or Current Agricultural Questions. — 
Government conservation policy, roads, railways, trolleys, telephones, postal 
service, credit facilities, taxation, pure food laws, tenancy and ownership, 
intensive versus extensive farming, agricultural labor; 3 hours. Credit, 3. 

Associate Professor Eyerly. 

13. Seminar. Associate Professor Eyerly. 



80 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [Jan. 



GENERAL DEPARTMENTS. 
MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS. 

Captain Martin, Mr. Parsons. 

[The Department of Military Science and Tactics conducts its work in conjunction 
•with the Department of Physical Education and Hygiene, in accordance with the 
following statement : — ■ 

All candidates for a degree in a four-years course must take for three years three 
full hours a week of physical training. This work must be under college super- 
vision. At least two years of the work must be taken in the Department of Military 
Science and Tactics, in accordance with the requirements of the War Department; 
the rest is to be taken in the Department of Physical Education. 

Under this arrangement, the practical (drill) courses in Military Science are given 
up to the Christmas recess and from the close of the spring recess to the end of the 
semester each year; the corresponding courses in Physical Education occupy the 
intervening time. 

Under act of Congress (July 2, 1862), military instruction under a regular army 
officer is required in this college of all able-bodied male students. Men are excused 
from the exercises of this department only upon presentation of a certificate given 
by the college physician; minor disabilities which might bar enlistment are not con- 
sidered. Students excused from military duty may be required to take equivalent 
work. The object of the instruction is to disseminate military knowledge in order 
that in emergency trained men may be found to command volunteer troops; but a 
further object is to give physical exercise, to teach obedience without detracting from 
self-respect, and to develop the bearing and courtesy that are as becoming in a citizen 
as in a soldier. Absences and other offences of military nature, and those of which 
the military instructor may take cognizance as affecting discipline, are dealt with 
by the commandant in accordance with the regulations of the department; but 
delinquencies in theoretical instruction not strictly military in their nature are dealt 
with in accordance with the rules of the faculty. 

Cadets in the graduating class who have shown special aptitude for military service 
are reported to the Adjutant-General of the United States army and to the Adjutant- 
General of Massachusetts ; in making appointments from civil life to the regular or 
volunteer army, preference is given to those who have been so reported. The names 
of the three most distinguished are published in the " Official Register of the United 
States Arcny." Assignments to the band are made by the military instructor. Prac- 
tice in the band is credited in place of drill and theoretical instruction. 

The required uniform is of khaki, costing about $15. It is worn by all cadets 
when on military duty, and may be worn at other times. The uniforms are procured 
through an authorized tailor. Students upon entering college are required to deposit 
$15 with the college treasurer to cover the cost of the uniform. The sale of old 
uniforms is prohibited, unless the consent of the military instructor be obtained.] 



"Required, Courses. 

1. Freshman Drill. — Practical instruction in infantry drill regulations 
through the school of the battalion in close and extended order; advance 
and rear guards; outposts; marches; ceremonies; guard duty. Upon the 
conduct and proficiency of this year depends the appointment of corporals 
for the ensuing year. Freshmen; first semester until Christmas recess; 
3 hours. Credit, 1. Captain Martin, Mr. Parsons. 

2. Freshman Drill. — As stated under Course 1. Freshmen; second 
semester after spring recess; 3 hours. Credit, 1. 



1913.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 81 

3. Sophomore Drill. — Practical instruction as before; pointing, aiming 
and sighting drills; litter drills, and first aid to the injured by detachment; 
target practice, in gallery and on the range. Corporals are appointed from 
this class. On their conduct and proficiency depends the appointment of 
sergeants in the next class. Sophomores; first semester until Christmas 
recess; 3 hours. Credit, 1. Captain Martin, Mr. Parsons. 

4. Sophomore Drill. — As stated under Course 3. Sophomores; second 
semester after spring recess; 3 hours. Credit, 1. 

5. Sophomore Tactics. — Theoretical instruction in " Infantry Drill 
Eegulations," to include the school of the company, " Manual of Guard 
Duty," "Small Arms Firing Eegulations." Sophomores; 1 hour. Credit, 1. 

Captain Martin. 

6. Sophomore Tactics. — As stated under Course 5. Sophomores; 1 
hour. Credit, 1. 

7. Junior Drill. — Practical instruction as before, target practice, in 
gallery and on the range. Sergeants are appointed from this class. On 
their conduct and proficiency depends their selection as officers for the ensu- 
ing year. When necessary, officers will also be appointed from this class. 
Juniors; first semester until Christmas recess; 3 hours. Credit, 1. 

Captain Martin, Mr. Parsons. 

8. Junior Drill. — As stated under Course 7. Juniors; second semester 
after spring recess; 3 hours. Credit, 1. 

9. Junior Tactics. — Theoretical instruction in " Infantry Drill Eegu- 
lations," to include the school of the battalion; advance and rear guards; 
outposts ; marches and ceremonies ; " Manual of Field Service Eegulations ; " 
preparation of reports; returns, muster-rolls, enlistment and discharge pa- 
pers, rosters, requisitions, etc.; army regulations; lectures on military 
science. Juniors; 1 hour. Credit, 1. Captain Martin. 

10. Junior Tactics. — As stated under Course 9. Juniors; 1 hour. 
Credit, 1. 

Elective Courses. 

11. Senior Drill. — Practical instruction as before; conduct of drills of 
lower classes. Officers will as a rule be selected from this class. Cadets 
electing Courses 11 and 12 must take the election for the year, and not 
later than the first Monday in June of their junior year. No cadet electing 
this course will after the commencement drill be permitted ' to change his 
election without the consent of the dean of the faculty and of the com- 
mandant. Seniors; first semester until Christmas recess; 3 hours. Credit, 1. 

Captain Martin. 

12. Senior Drill. — As stated under Course 11. Seniors; second semes- 
ter after spring recess; 3 hours. Credit, 1. 



82 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [Jan. 1913. 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND HYGIENE. 

Assistant Professor Hicks, Mr. Fitzmaurice. 
Hygiene. 
Required Courses. 
1. Hygiene. — Lectures, reading, quizzes and a report on some assigned 
topic of personal hygiene or sanitation. Freshmen; 1 hour. Credit, 1. 

Assistant Professor Hicks. 

Physical Education. 

[The Department of Physical Education conducts its work in physical training in 
conjunction with the Department of Military Science and Tactics, as explained in 
the note preceding the description of the courses in Military Science. All classified 
undergraduate students are given a physical examination upon entering.] 

Required Courses. 

1. Elementary Gymnastics. — Exercises, games and athletics; from 
January 1 to April 1, in connection with Course 2. Freshmen; 3 hours. 
Credit (given only for Course 2), 1. 

Assistant Professor Hicks and Mr. Fitzmaurice. 

2. Elementary Gymnastics. — As stated under Course 1. ■ 

3. Graded Gymnastics. — Exercises, games and athletics; from January 
1 to April 1, in connection with Course 4. Sophomores; 3 hours. Credit 
(given only for Course 4), 1. 

Assistant Professor Hicks and Mr. Fitzmaurice. 

4. Graded Gymnastics. — As stated under Course 3. 

5. Gymnastics. — Drills, games and athletics ; from January 1 to April 
1, in connection with Course 6. Juniors; 3 hours. Credit (given only 
for Course 6), 1. Assistant Professor Hicks and Mr. Fitzmaurice. 

6. Gymnastics. — As stated under Course 5. 

Elective Courses. 

7. Training Course. — Leadership class and squad work ; supervision of 
indoor and outdoor athletic contests and games; boxing and wrestling. Sen- 
iors; 3 hours. Credit, 1. Assistant Professor Hicks. 

8. Training Course. — As stated under Course 7. 



The Graduate School. 



The Gkaduate School. 



Kbnyon L. Btjtterfield, A.M., LL.D., President of the College. 

Charles E. Marshall, Ph.D., Director of the Graduate School and Professor of 

Microbiology. 

Graduate courses leading to the degrees of master of science and doctor 
of philosophy have been given for a number of years. Demands for these 
courses have now greatly increased, and in recognition of the benefits to be 
derived from a separate organization, a distinct graduate school has been 
established for the purpose of fitting graduates of this and other institutions 
for teaching in colleges, high schools and other public schools; for positions 
as government, State and experiment-station agriculturists, bacteriologists, 
botanists, chemists, entomologists, horticulturists and zoologists; and for 
numerous other positions requiring a great degree of skill and scientific 
knowledge. 

Admission. 
Admission to the graduate school will be granted : — 

1. To graduates of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

2. To graduates of other institutions of good standing who have received 
a bachelor's degree substantially equivalent to that conferred by this college. 

In case an applicant presents his diploma from an institution of good 
standing, but has not, as an undergraduate, taken as much of the subject 
he selects for his major as is required of undergraduates at the Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College, he will be required to make up such parts of the 
undergraduate work in that subject as the professor in charge may consider 
necessary. He shall do this without credit toward his advanced degree. 

Admission to the graduate school does not necessarily admit to candidacy 
for an advanced degree, — students holding a bachelor's degree being in 
some cases permitted to take graduate work without becoming candidates 
for higher degrees. 

Applications for membership to the graduate school should be presented 
to the director of the school. Full statements of the applicant's previous 
training, of the graduate work desired, and of the amount and kind of work 
already done by him as an undergraduate should be submitted, — together 
with a statement whether the applicant desires to work for a degree. 

Eegistration is required of all students taking gradiiate courses, the first 
registration being permitted only after the student has received an authori- 
zation card from the director. 



86 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [Jan. 



Nature and Methods of Graduate "Work. 

Persons taking graduate work will find this quite different in its nature 
from undergraduate courses. A broad knowledge of two (or three) subjects 
is required, and the professors in charge of these may adopt any methods 
which may seem desirable to secure this to the student. Lectures, laboratory 
and field work in various forms are utilized; but whatever the method 
chosen, the aim is to train the students in methods of original investigation 
and experiment, inductive reasoning and the ability to carry on independent 
research. In addition to the lectures, a large amount of outside reading is 
required, the object being to give a broad knowledge of all aspects of the 
subjects chosen, in addition to the complete knowledge of those portions 
involved in or directly related to the original investigation which is to result 
in the thesis. Originality and ability to lead in scientific research after 
completing graduate work, and the establishment of a broad and thorough 
foundation upon which these qualities must be based, are the objects aimed 
at; and any methods which promise to give these results may be made use 
of (varying according to the nature and personal equation of each student), 
the supervision being largely individual rather than collective. 

Candidates for the degree of master of science are required to prosecute 
two subjects, one of which shall be designated as the major and the other 
as the minor. These subjects may not be selected in the same department. 

Candidates for the degree of doctor of philosophy are required to prose- 
cute three subjects, one of which shall be designated as the major, the others 
as minors. No two of these subjects may be taken in the same department. 

Advanced students who are not candidates for degrees may, with the ap- 
proval of the faculty of the school, take more than one subject in the same 
department. 

A statement of the subjects chosen must in each case be submitted to the 
director of the school for approval by the necessary committee. The chosen 
subjects must bear an appropriate relation to each other. 

A working knowledge of French and German is essential to successful 
graduate work, and students not having this will find it necessary to acquire 
it as soon as possible after entering. 

A description of the equipment of the various departments is given under 
" General Information." 

Theses. 

A thesis is required of each candidate for an advanced degree. It must 
be on a topic belonging to the candidate's major subject, must show that its 
writer possesses the ability to carry on original research, and must be an 
actual contribution to knowledge. 

Two copies of each thesis in its final form, ready for the printer, must be 
submitted to the director of the school before the candidate for the degree 
may take the required oral examination. One of the said copies, to contain 
all drawings, is to be retained as an official copy by the said director, and 
the other by the department in which the thesis was prepared. The candi- 
date for the doctor's degree must be prepared to defend at the oral exam- 
ination the views presented in his thesis. When printed, three copies of each 



1913.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 87 

thesis must be deposited with the director of the graduate school and three 
copies with the department in which the work was carried out. 

All theses become the property of the department in which they are pre- 
pared. 

Final Examinations. 

For the degree of master of science, a final examination, which may be 
either written or oral, or both, is given upon the completion of each subject. 

For the degree of doctor of philosophy, final examinations on the minors 
taken are given upon the completion of the subjects. In the major subject, 
a written examination, if successfully passed, is followed by an oral exam- 
ination in the presence of the faculty of the school. 

Degrees conferred. 

The degree of master of science is conferred upon graduate students who 
have met the following requirements : — 

1. The devotion of at least one year and a half to the prosecution of study 
in two subjects of study and research, not less than one full college year 
of which must be in residence. 

2. The devotion of twenty hours each week to the chief or major subject, 
and of from twelve to sixteen hours per week to the minor subject. 

3. The preparation of a thesis in the major subject, constituting an actual 
contribution to knowledge, and accompanied by drawings if necessary. 

4. The passing of final examinations, in both major and minor subjects, 
to the satisfaction of the professors in charge. 

5. The payment of all fees and college expenses required. 

The degree of doctor of philosophy is conferred upon graduate students 
who have met the following requirements: — 

1. The devotion of at least three years to the prosecution of three sub- 
jects of study and research in residence at the college. 

2. The devotion of twenty hours each week to the chief or major subject 
during the entire period, and of from twelve to sixteen hours per week for 
a year and a half to each minor subject. 

3. The preparation of a thesis, in the major subject, constituting an 
actual contribution to knowledge, and accompanied by drawings if neces- 
sary. 

4. The passing of final examinations, in both the major and minor sub- 
jects, to the satisfaction of the professors in charge. 

5. The payment of all fees and college expenses required. 

The fee for the degree of master of science is $10, and for the degree of 
doctor of philosophy, $25. 

Courses for Degree of Master of Science. 
Available either as major or minor subjects for the degree of master of 
science : — 

Agriculture. Horticulture. 

Botany. Mathematics and physics. 

Chemistry. Veterinary science. 

Entomology. Zoology (minor only). 



88 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [Jan. 

Courses for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy. 
Available for a major subject for the degree of doctor of philosophy: — 

Botany. Entomology. 

Chemistry. Horticulture. 

Available for a minor subject for the degree of doctor of philosophy : — 

Agriculture. Entomology. 

Botany. Horticulture. 

Chemistry. Zoology. 

General Outline of Courses for the Doctorate. 
Major Courses. 
Botany. — The following subjects in botany may be studied: — 
(a) Vegetable physiology. 
(&) Vegetable pathology. 

(c) Mycology. 

(d) Ecology. 

(e) Taxonomy. 
K f) Phylogeny. 

(g) History of Botany. 

(Ji) History and theory of evolution. 

These subjects are pursued, to a greater or less extent, as the previous 
training of the student and the nature of the original problem undertaken 
may determine. The object of the course is to give the student a technical 
training in botany, to develop the spirit of research and to lay a broad 
foundation in the subject. (As a supplement to this course the student will 
do well to take, in addition to his prescribed minor work, a brief course in 
the history of philosophy and psychology.) Extensive reading of botanical 
literature, both general and specific, is required in certain subjects, and 
occasional lectures are given. A botanical conference is held monthly, in 
which various new problems of botanical science are considered by graduate 
students and the seniors who elect botany. A thesis dealing with some 
economic problem in plant physiology or pathology, or in both, and con- 
taining a distinct contribution to knowledge, is required. 

Chemistry. — The department is prepared to offer advanced courses in 
the following branches of chemistry, particularly as applied to agricul- 
ture : — 

(a) Inorganic chemistry. 

(6) Organic chemistry. 

(c) Physiological chemistry. 

(cZ) Physical chemistry. 

(e) Analytical chemistry. 

Here follows a statement of courses which may be selected by any one 
properly qualified, and particularly by those who are desirous of doing work 
for advanced degrees: — 

Course A. Eesearch in industrial problems applied to agriculture. 

Associate Professor Peters. 



1913.] PUBLIC ■ DOCUMENT — No. 31. 89 

Course B. Eesearch in physico-agricultural chemistry. Prerequisite, 
Course 15 or its equivalent. Assistant .Professor Anderson. 

Course C. Advanced analytical chemistry. Eesearch work in connection 
with the study of methods of analysis of fertilizers, cattle feeds, dairy 
products, soils, insecticides and sugars. Eecent and original methods will 
be applied to a study of the composition of agricultural products. 

Professor Wellington. 

Course D. Advanced organic chemistry. Special topics in advanced or- 
ganic chemistry will be considered, both by lectures and in the laboratory. 
These will include such subjects as constitution and properties of carbo- 
hydrates, proteins and fats, uric acid and related compounds, and alkaloids; 
also such purely chemical phenomena as isomerism, tautomerism and optical 
rotation. The reading will include " The Monographs on Biochemistry," 
Cohen, Sehorlemmer and Lachman. Associate Professor Chamberlain. 

Course E. Advanced topics in physiological agricultural chemistry will 
be studied especially in the laboratory, including digestion, metabolism and 
nutrition, dietetics, feeding rations, enzymatic action and isolation of en- 
zymes. Eequired reading will be followed in Abderhalden, Lusk, Hammer- 
sten, Stiles, Armsby and Euhler. Associate Professor Chamberlain. 

Students for the advanced degrees of master of science and doctor of 
philosophy will be given a special outline of work, and will also be assigned 
a subject for an original thesis by the professor in charge of the work, all 
of which must be completed to the satisfaction of the chemical staff and 
particularly of the professor under whom the work is done. Students not 
working for a degree may take special work along agricultural chemical 
lines. Information may be obtained by consulting the chemical staff. 

Entomology. — I. For the degree of doctor of philosophy as a major: 
Some knowledge of ' all the divisions of this subject is essential for the 
professional entomologist, through a large part of his time will be devoted 
only to certain portions. To insure some familiarity with all these divi- 
sions, lectures, laboratory work, field training or required reading are given 
in each of the following topics : — 

(a) Morphology. — Embryology; life history and transformations; his- 
tology; phylogeny and the relation of insects to other arthropods; her- 
maphroditism; hybrids; parthenogenesis; pedogenesis; heterogeny; chem- 
istry of colors of insects; luminosity; deformities of insects; variation; 
duration of life. 

(&) Ecology. — Dimorphism; polymorphism; warning coloration; mim- 
icry ; insect architecture ; fertilization of plants by insects ; instincts of 
insects; insect products of value to man; geographical distribution in the 
different faunal regions; methods of distribution; insect migration; geo- 
logical history of insects; insects as disseminators of disease; enemies of 
insects, vegetable and animal, including parasites. 

(c) Economic Entomology. — General principles; insecticides; apparatus; 
special cases; photographs of insects and their work; methods of drawing 



90 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [Jan. 1913. 

for illustrations ; field work on insects and study of life histories ; legisla- 
tion concerning insects^ 

(d) Systematic Entomology. — History of entomology, including classi- 
fications and the principles of classification; laws governing nomenclature; 
literature, how to find and use it; indexing literature; number of insects in 
collections and in existence (estimated) ; lives of prominent entomologists; 
methods of collecting, preparing, preserving and shipping insects; im- 
portant collections of insects. 

(e) Seminar. — A monthly meeting of graduates, at which reports on 
current literature are presented and various entomological topics of im- 
portance are discussed. 

(/) Bequired Readings. — The best article on the various topics named 
above and on the different orders of insects, to cover from fifteen thousand to 
twenty thousand pages of English, French and German, the candidate to 
be examined at the close of his course on this with his other work. 

(g) Thesis. — A thesis, illustrated with drawings, consisting of the re- 
sults of original investigation upon one or several topics, and constituting 
a distinct contribution to knowledge, must be completed before the' final 
examinations are taken. 

II. For the degree of doctor of philosophy as a minor, and for the 
degree of master of science either as a major or minor: Such portions of 
the course outlined above as seem most appropriate to their other subjects 
are given to students taking entomology as a minor. 

Horticulture. — Graduate work is offered in various lines of horti- 
culture. For the most part this is divided into the different departments 
which now constitute the college Division of Horticulture, and which are as 
follows: Pomology, Floriculture, Landscape Gardening, Forestry and Market 
Gardening. For work in these lines application should be made direct 
to the heads of the several departments. 

Besides this work, however, opportunity is offered for graduate study 
in General Horticulture, including topics from the several organized de- 
partments mentioned, and also questions relating to plant breeding, general 
evolution, propagation, manufacture of horticultural products, etc. This 
general work is under the direction of Prof. F. A. Waugh, head of the 
Division of Horticulture. 

Zoology. — Courses in zoology are available as a minor for the degree 
of master of science, and as a minor for the degree of doctor of philosophy. 
The nature of the work varies according to circumstances, and may be 
intensive in a special field, or of a somewhat more general character, de- 
pending on the student's previous acquaintancex with general zoological 
science. 

The time devoted to zoology as a minor for either of the above-named 
degrees may vary from 12 to 16 hours per week, pursued for a year and 
a half. 



The Short Courses 



and 



The Extension Service. 



The Short Courses and the Extension Service. 



The Short Courses and the Extension Service. 

Through its Extension Service, the Massachusetts Agricultural College 
attempts to make every department of the institution a contributing factor 
toward developing the agriculture and country life of the Commonwealth. 
The work of the Extension Service divides itself quite naturally into the 
Short Courses given at the college and the various activities of an educa- 
tional nature which are carried on all over the State. 

Under the usual definition of extension activities, Short Courses are not 
strictly extension projects. They are rather a part of the academic work of 
the institution. For the sake of administrative efficiency it has seemed 
best to place them in charge of the director of the Extension Service in so 
far as organization and direction are necessary. An effort is made through 
these courses to bring to the college, for a few days or a few weeks, as 
many people as can possibly be reached in this way. In the main, the 
instruction in the Short Courses is given by the regular teaching force of 
the college, the same laboratories and equipment being used for this work 
as in the regular college work. 

The Extension Service proper comprises various methods for the dis- 
semination of agricultural information to the people of the Commonwealth 
who are interested in agriculture and country life, but who cannot come 
to the college for even a short time. The object of the Extension Service 
is to make the college as useful to the people of the Commonwealth as 
possible. 

A. THE SHOET COUESES. 
Organization and Description. 

The work is organized thus: — 

Short Courses given at the College. 

1. Winter School. 

(a) Ten "Weeks' Winter Course. 

(b) Apple Packing School. 

(c) Farmers' Week. 

(d) Beekeepers' Course and Conference. 

(e) Poultry Conference. 

2. Summer School. 

(a) The Summer School (General Course). 
(&) Conference for Rural Community Leaders. 

Expenses in the Short Courses. — The expense of attending any of 
the Short Courses will be about as follows : — 

Registration fee, ........... $5 

Furnished rooms in private houses, ........ $1.50— $3 

Board at college dining hall, per week, ....... $4 

Board with private families, per week, ....... $5— $6 



94 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [Jan. 

It is expected that a lunch counter will be operated in connection with 
the college dining hall. Meals may be obtained there a la carte at very 
reasonable prices. 

Students in each of the dairy courses must provide themselves with two 
white wash suits and a white cap for use in the practical dairy work. The 
cost in Amherst is about $1.25 for suit and cap. 

Requirements foe Admission to Short Courses. — No entrance ex- 
aminations are required, but students are advised to review their school 
work in English and arithmetic. Practical experience in farm, garden, 
orchard or greenhouse work will be an advantage. The courses are open 
to both men and women. 

Students must be at least eighteen years of age and must furnish satis- 
factory evidence of good moral character. Eeferences are required and 
these are, investigated before applicants are accepted. 

Winter School. 
Courses in the Ten Weeks' Winter School (Jan. 6 to March 14, 
1913). — The following courses were given: — 

1. Soil Fertility. Associate Professor Haskell. Three periods a week for ten 

weeks. 

2. Field Crops. Mr. E. M. McDonald. Three periods each week for ten weeks. 

3. Breeds and Breeding. Associate Professor McLean and Mr. Qtjaife. Three 

one-hour and two two-hour periods each week for ten weeks. 

4. Feeding and Management. Associate Professor McLean and Mr. Qtjaife. Two 

periods each week for ten weeks. 

5. Dairying. Associate Professor Lockwood, Mr. Coons and assistants. Three 

one-hour, two two-hour and two three-hour periods each week for ten weeks. 

6. Dairy Bacteriology. Associate Professor Lockwood. Two periods each week. 

7. Animal Diseases and Stable Sanitation. Professor Paige. Two periods each 

week for ten weeks. 

8. Poultry. Associate Professor Graham. Five one-hour and two two-hour periods 

each week for ten weeks. 

9. Fruit Growing. Professor Sears. Four lectures and one laboratory period each 

week for ten weeks. 

10. Market Gardening. Assistant Professor Yeaw. Two periods each week for ten 

weeks. 

11. Landscape Gardening. Mr. Harrison. Two periods each week for ten weeks. 

12. Floriculture. Professor White. Five periods each week for ten weeks. 

13. Forestry. Professor Clark. One lecture a week for ten weeks. 

14. Botany. Assistant Professor Osmun and Mr. McLaughlin. Three periods each 

week. 

15. Entomology. Professor Fernald and assistants. Three periods each week for 

ten weeks. 

16. New England Agriculture (required). Two periods a week for ten weeks. 

17. Farm Buildings. Professor Foord. One period a week for ten weeks. 

18. Farm Accounts. Professor Foord. Two periods each week for ten weeks. 

19. Mechanics. Associate Professor Lockwood and Mr. Schroyer. Two periods 

each week for ten weeks. 

20. Rural Sanitary Science. Assistant Professor Gage. Two periods each week for 

ten weeks. 

21. Beekeeping. Assistant Professor Gates. Two periods each week for ten weeks. 

22. Rural Improvement. Professor Waugh. One lecture each week for ten weeks. 

Apple Packing School. — The work of this school, which is conducted 
by the department of pomology, is of a practical nature and includes both 
box and barrel packing. Persons taking the course will become familiar 



1913.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 95 

with the various types of packs and will receive sufficient practice to enable 
them to do good commercial packing. 

The work in packing is supplemented by lectures on phases of com- 
merical orcharding, such as planting, varieties, spraying, pruning, harvest- 
ing and marketing. 

A fee of $5 to help pay for fruit and other materials used is charged for 
this course. 

Farmers' Week. — In order to reach those who cannot come to the col- 
lege for a longer time this very practical course, four days in length, is 
given each year. The regular college equipment is used and work of the 
regular faculty is supplemented by lectures and demonstrations given by 
eminent men. 

The work is divided into four sections: (1) General agriculture, to in- 
clude farm management, farm crops and so forth; (2) Dairying, animal 
breeding and feeding, poultry, veterinary science and bacteriology; (3) 
Horticulture, to include fruit growing, market gardening, floriculture and 
forestry; (4) Farmers' wives' section, including lectures and demonstra- 
tions in home economics, cooking and problems of homemaking. 

Features of the week are the evening lectures by specialists along agri- 
cultural lines, the conference pertaining to problems of rural betterment 
aside from practical agricultural topics, a corn show, grain show, dairy 
show and so forth. 

The Massachusetts Dairymen's Association and the Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural College Agricultural Improvement Association hold their annual 
meetings at the college during this week. 

Compete programs of the 1914 Farmers' Week may be obtained in 
February, 1914. 

Beekeepers' Course. — In the last three years a complete apiary and 
equipment has been brought together at the college, under the direction 
and management of Dr. Burton N. Gates. This equipment furnishes the 
best of facilities for the teaching of beekeeping and allied subjects. A 
conference of beekeepers, with extensive exhibits of beekeepers' supplies 
and apparatus, is held annually at the close of each short course. 

The courses offered in 1913 are : — 

Practical Phases of Beekeeping. Associate Professor Gates. 

Crops for Honey Bees. Dr. Brooks. 

Relation of Bees to the Pollination of Plants. Professor Stone. 

4. Origin and Evolution of the Honey Bee. Professor Fernald. 

5. Bees and Beekeepers' Supplies. Professor Paige. 

The features of the convention are lectures, demonstrations by authori- 
ties of national reputation, as well as exhibits of inventors, manufacturers, 
supply merchants and queen rearers. A special invitation is extended to 
all beekeepers to display and demonstrate inventions, implements or methods. 
If table space is desired or special equipment is to be prepared, notice 
should be sent to Dr. Burton N. Gates, Amherst, Mass., at least two or 
three weeks before the convention. The college provides covered tables 
for the exhibits. 

Poultry Conference. — In order to give a large number of poultrymen, 
who cannot come to the college for a longer time, practical instruction in 



96 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [Jan. 

modern methods of breeding, feeding, poultry-house construction, operation 
of incubators and brooders, selecting and judging poultry for utility and 
for show, marketing poultry products, and so forth, a convention lasting 
nearly a week is held each year. The regular date has been changed from 
the spring of the year to the summer, and the meeting will be held July 
28-30, 1913. 

The Summer School. 

The Summer School of Agriculture of the Massachusetts Agricultural 
College, which was omitted in 1912, reopens July 1, 1913, for a term of 
five weeks. This is the sixth session of the summer school, those of 1907 to 
1911 having been highly successful. The experience of these five years will 
aid in making material improvements in the session of 1913. 

The work of the summer school was designed originally for school teachers. 
The attendance has been largely of that class, and special attention will be 
given to the needs of teachers each year. It has been found, however, that 
there are many others who seek a general knowledge of theoretical and 
practical agriculture, and who can come to the college conveniently during 
the summer season. Extended courses are offered for the benefit of such 
persons also. 

The following courses will probably be offered in 1913 : — 

Soils and tillage, field crops, domestic animals, dairying, poultry hus- 
bandry, fruit growing, practical gardening, trees and shrubs, forestry, land- 
scape gardening, elementary chemistry, agricultural chemistry, plant life, 
cryptogamic botany, bird life, insect life, entomology, beekeeping, home 
economics, domestic science, home and school gardening, high school agri- 
culture, home floriculture, agricultural economics, rural sociology, rural 
literature, agricultural education, organized play and recreation, arts and 
crafts. 

From these courses it will be possible to make up programs of work 
suitable to the needs of almost every one, but especially of school teachers, 
principals, superintendents, school committeemen, farm owners, householders, 
suburban residents, clergymen, pastors, preachers, social workers and those 
who have a general interest in agriculture. Persons who are in doubt as 
to what courses will best suit their needs had better correspond with the 
Director of the Extension Service, who will gladly advise in all such matters. 

Special courses covering two weeks are offered especially for clergymen, 
librarians and other rural leaders. 

General Plan. — From the courses offered, each student may elect 
courses amounting to not less than ten nor more than fifteen exercises a 
week, unless a larger or smaller amount of work is permitted by the 
director. These courses include a large amount of field work, observation 
trips, outdoor exercises and laboratory experiments. 

Besides these, general field exercises are arranged for one afternoon each 
week. These are on topics of interest to all. Class excursions are arranged 
for every Wednesday afternoon, and more extended excursions for the whole 
school are conducted every Saturday. These are personally conducted by 
members of the faculty. 

Pound tables and special discussions are arranged by various instruc- 
tors as their courses require. 



1913.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 97 

A course of evening lectures on popular topics relating to the work of the 
school are a feature of the general program. Several able lecturers are 
engaged each year for this course. No admission is charged for these 
lectures. 

The expenses are low. Amherst is situated in one of the most noted 
historical and educational centers in this country. Any one interested in 
problems pertaining to country life should not fail to attend. A descriptive 
bulletin can be had March 1, 1913. 

Conference of Rural Leaders. — The Annual Conference of Eural 
Leaders will be held July 30-August 2, as a closing feature of the summer 
school. 

It is hoped the following organizations will co-operate as usual with the 
college by furnishing teachers and lecturers for their respective sections: 
the Federation of Churches of Massachusetts, the State Board of Educa- 
tion, the Free Public Library Commission, the Massachusetts Civic League, 
the State Board of Health, the County Work of the Young Men's Christian 
Association, the National Board of the Young Women's Christian Associa- 
tion, the New England Home Economies Association, the Russell Sage 
Foundation and the State Grange. 

Definite class instruction will be given each morning. The afternoons 
will be given up entirely to special and general conferences, demonstrations 
of organized play, recreation and so forth. The evenings will be given over 
to music and lectures by the most eminent men who are making a study 
of rural sociology, economics and education. 

The Rural Social Service exhibits will be more elaborate and extensive 
than in 1912. 

The object of this conference is to acquaint those who are leaders in 
their respective communities with the work that is going on, not only in 
Massachusetts but in New England and other parts of the world, and to 
give them renewed inspiration and enthusiasm for larger and more intel- 
ligent efforts. 

Teachers, clergymen, grange officers, librarians, county Y. M. C. A. 
workers, town officers, boards of health, officers of village improvement 
societies, homemakers, school officers, and all others interested in community 
development, are cordially invited to attend this conference. The expenses 
for board and room are low. There are no tuition or registration fees. 

A complete program will be published in June, 1913, and can be had on 
application. 

B. THE EXTENSION SERVICE. 
Organization and Description. 

1. Special Days for Foreigners, Agricultural Associations, etc. 

2. Instruction given away from the College. 

(1) Correspondence Courses. 

(2) Lecture Courses and Demonstrations. 

(3) Conferences for Community Development. 

(4) Extension Schools of Agriculture. 

(5) Educational Trains (Steam and Trolley). 

(6) Educational Exhibits, with Lectures and Demonstrations at Pairs. 

(7) Demonstration Orchards. 

(8) Dairy Improvement Associations. 

(9) The Massachusetts Agricultural College Agricultural Improvement Associa- 

tion. 



98 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [Jan. 

(10) Agricultural Surveys. 

(11) Advisory Work with State Institutions, Individuals, etc. 

(12) Publications, "Facts for Farmers," etc. 

(13) Student Extension Work. 

(14) Faunce Demonstration Farm. 

(15) Boys' and Girls' Clubs. 

(16) Demonstration Plots. 

(17) Traveling Libraries. 

(18) Co-operation with various organizations already in existence. 

(19) District Field Agents. 

(20) Information by Correspondence, etc. 

1. Special Days for Foreigners, Associations, etc. 

Days are set aside for special attention to the interests of foreigners, 
of agricultural organizations, etc. 

Agricultural Organizations. — It has been especially pleasing to the 
college to have organizations such as the Massachusetts Poultry Associa- 
tion, the Massachusetts Fruit Growers' Association, Market Gardeners' 
and Breeders' associations, and others, meet frequently at the college. 
Usually a program of one or two days is provided, largely by the college 
faculty. These meetings serve the twofold purpose of giving the mem- 
bers of these organizations a chance to inspect the equipment and see 
the work that is being carried on by the college, and it also gives the 
college men a chance to find , out the needs of the men engaged in the 
various lines of agriculture. It is hoped that other organizations besides 
those mentioned above will also meet at the college and that meeting will 
be even more frequent than in the past. 

Polish Farmers' Day. — In order to show the Polish farmer — who 
forms a large part of the population of this section of the Connecticut 
valley — what the college has to offer him, a Polish Farmers' Day is held 
each year with much success. Members of the faculty give lectures which 
are interpreted by Mr. K. J. Wolski of Holyoke; some of the Polish farmers 
who have made a success of farming also . give talks. The Immigration 
Department of the State, the Y. M. C. A. and the Polish American Al- 
liance co-operate with the college in this work. 

2. Instruction given away from the College. 

An abstract follows of the instruction that is given away from the col- 
lege. The abstract divides this instruction into correspondence courses 
and instruction not included in the correspondence course. 

Correspondence Courses. — The correspondence courses are offered by the 
college in response to calls from all sections of the State from people who 
desire agricultural information, but who cannot come to the college for it. 
The courses are designed to meet the needs of farmers, dairymen, stock 
breeders, fruit growers, market gardeners, floriculturists and teachers in 
elementary schools, high schools, academies or normal schools. 

Since agricultural science and practice are changing so rapidly, it is the 
purpose to give a summary of the latest information on the subjects treated, 
yet in such language that any who pursue the study can readily understand 
the work. Additional courses, covering other subjects, will be added from 
year to year. 



1913.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 99 

Method of Conducting Correspondence Work. — While a large number of 
books have been written on various agricultural subjects, very few of them 
are especially adapted to the correspondence course work. For this reason 
our courses are conducted principally by specially prepared lessons. The 
subject-matter partakes somewhat of the lectures that are given to the 
college classes. Whenever possible we recommend .one or two books which 
ought to be purchased and read along with the course. Other books are 
recommended for collateral reading, which oftentimes can be obtained from 
the local libraries. 

The courses are especially recommended to the Y. M. C. A. and to granges 
and other farmers' clubs for study. It is to be hoped that grange lecturers, 
club secretaries, and other interested persons, will organize study classes. 
If the size of the class, or the interest which the members take in the 
subject, is sufficient, we shall be pleased to send a representative of the 
college to the class from time to time to discuss the work and offer sug- 
gestions. A description of the correspondence courses follows : — 

1. Soil and Soil Improvement. Director Hurd. 

2. Manures and Fertilizers. Director Hurd. 

3. Field Crops. Associate Professor Haskell. 

4. Farm Dairying. Associate Professor Lookwood. 

5. Fruit Growing. Professor Sears and Mr. Rees. 

6. Market Gardening. Assistant Professor Yeaw. 

7. Animal Feeding. Mr. Story. 

8. Floriculture. Professor White. Part I. The general culture of plants, includ- 

ing those grown out of doors as well as those grown under glass. Part II. 
Greenhouse construction and heating. Part III. Carnation culture. Part IV. 
Rose culture. The cost of each part, not including the text-book, is $1. 

9. Farm Accounts. Professor Foord. 

10. Entomology. Professor Fernald. 

11. Agricultural Education. Professor Hart. 

12. Beekeeping. Assistant Professor Gates. 

13. Forestry. Professor Clark. 

14. Shade Tree Management. Professor Stone. 

15. Agriculture in the Elementary Schools. Associate Professor Morton. 

16. Community Co-operation in Elementary Education. Associate Professor Morton. 

17. Poultry Husbandry. Associate Professor Graham. (Will be ready February, 

1913.) 

Enrollment for Correspondence Courses. — Students may enroll in the 
courses any time between September 1 and June 1 of the following year. 
It has been found advisable not to continue the courses through the sum- 
mer because the farmers as well as the other students are so busy that 
they cannot spend the necessary amount of time upon the lessons during 
the summer months. We are better equipped than we were last year to 
handle the great number of students who desire these courses, and we 
hope to be able to take care of all the students who enroll. An early 
enrollment is advised, however. 

Enrollment must be made on the card which is furnished by the col- 
lege. This will entitle the student to a suitable set of covers and other 
privileges. 

Expenses of the Correspondence Courses. — In order that none may en- 
roll but those who are interested and desire to pursue earnest study, a 
small fee is charged. This has been fixed at the uniform rate of $1 for 
each course, except in Course 8, where it is necessary to charge $1 for each 



100 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [Jan. 

of the four parts, as each part is really a course in itself. This fee is pay- 
able strictly in advance when the enrollment card is sent, and the first 
lesson of the course will not be sent until the fee is received. 

This fee is not charged to cover cost of preparing the course, for this, 
in time of the instructors, is many times what is received, but it is used 
to defray the expenses of postage and materials which are used in prepara- 
tion of the lessons, and to insure a higher quality of work from those who 
enroll. 

The cost of the text-book, when one is used, is in addition to the en- 
rollment fee. We strongly urge all students to purchase one or two books 
to be used in connection with each course, because they can be kept and 
used for reference purposes after the course is completed. We have made 
arrangements with the Johnson Book Company, Amherst, Mass., to handle 
all of these books at reduced rates. For a catalogue of books and prices, 
address the Johnson Book Company. Eemittances should be made by money 
order or check. 

Lecture and Demonstration Courses away from the College. — The 
renewed and unprecedented interest in agriculture and rural life makes 
many more calls on the college for lectures and demonstrations than can be 
met. These calls come from all sorts of organizations, and the audiences 
are usually of good size and composed of interested people, who are eager 
to get the latest scientific information to use in their work. A list of 
lectures and their subjects can be obtained upon request. 

Extension Schools of Agriculture. — The extension schools held by 
the college during the past year were most successful, and many applica- 
tions are being received for schools during 1912-13. . An effort is being 
made so to locate these schools that they may best serve the people of the 
whole State. Valuable features are being added, and the woi'k will be kept 
up to the highest possible standard. 

Educational Exhibits, Lectures and Demonstrations at Fairs. — 
During the past year lectures and demonstrations were given at sixteen 
fairs throughout the State. It is expected that during the next year a 
new college exhibit will be prepared which may be loaned to the fairs 
and other organizations which ask for an exhibit each year. Aside from 
the lectures and demonstrations which were given, successful stock judging 
contests were held under the direction of the college at 13 fairs. 

Demonstration Orchards. — During 1912, 2 new orchards have been 
planted and 1 orchard renovated, making a total of 10 new orchards and 4 
renovated orchards now under the direction of the college. Three new 
orchards have been promised for the spring of 1913. 

Dairy Improvement Associations. — At the present time three associa- 
tions have been organized. Others will be started as competent official 
testers can be found. 

The Massachusetts Agricultural College Agricultural Improve- 
ment Association. — This is an organization largely of graduates and 
ex-students of the college, banded together for the purpose of agricultural 
betterment in Massachusetts. There are at the present time about 136 
members, 30 of whom are taking active part in the producing of high- 
class seed corn and seed potatoes, and in demonstrating the possible im- 
provement of worn out pastures. 



1913.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 101 

The usefulness of this association in the State will depend almost 
wholly upon the energy with which the members enter into the plans 
worked out by the executive committee of the association. That great 
things are possible for the association is shown by the work done by 
similar associations in other States. 

Agricultural Surveys. — Through these surveys an attempt is made, 
by systematic study, to find out the exact conditions of farm management, 
including dairying, orcharding, poultry raising and other specialties, the 
income which is derived from these, and the facilities for marketing prod- 
ucts. An inquiry into the social, educational, religious and moral life of 
rural communities is also made. 

Advisory Work with State Institutions, Individuals, etc. — For the 
past two years special effort has been made to comply with the requests 
of State organizations and individuals for advice. Visits have been made 
when possible, but it is impossible to comply with half of the requests 
which come in each year. 

Extension Service Publications. — Each year bulletins and circulars 
descriptive of the various short courses are published. A monthly pamphlet, 
" Facts for Farmers," is also issued. It is the aim of this pamphlet to 
give timely information on agricultural subjects in a brief and simple 
manner. Articles on spraying, pruning, poultry, clean milk and so forth 
have been issued and are in great demand. Bulletins and " Facts for 
Farmers " will be sent to all who apply for them. 

Student Extension Work. — As would be expected in an institution 
which stands for agricultural improvement in its broadest sense, the 
students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College are eager to have a 
hand in the general work of community betterment carried on by the col- 
lege staff. A large number of students are employed each year in the 
teaching of English to foreigners in towns located near Amherst, and in 
carrying on helpful meetings of a general nature throughout the western 
part of the State. Calls for this kind of work are many, and the willing- 
ness on the part of the students is increasing from year to year. Under 
efficient management this work promises to be very successful in every 
detail. 

The Faunce Demonstration Farm. — This farm, located at Sandwich, 
is under the direction of a committee from the college faculty, of which the 
Director of the Extension Service is chairman. The farm has demonstrated 
beyond a doubt that small fruits, vegetables and poultry can be raised at 
a profit on Cape Cod. Through the work of this farm the whole com- 
munity has taken on new life. The superintendent of the farm, Mr. A. 
W. Doolittle, has taught agriculture in the schools of the village and has 
given much help to the farmers of Barnstable County by his personal visits 
to farms. 

Department of Agricultural Education. — The extension work of this 
department is devoted to the promotion of agriculture and practical arts 
relating to country life in the public schools of the State. This is done 
by means of conferences with school officials and school patrons, the pro- 
motion of agricultural clubs among the school children and giving lectures 
before granges, farmers' clubs, and other organizations interested in this 
line of endeavor. The work of the agricultural clubs is under the local 



102 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [Jan. 

management of the superintendent of schools or of some one suggested 
by him. Each town is expected to hold an exhibit of products. Exhibits 
covering rather extensive districts are incorporated with the various agri- 
cultural fairs in the State. In this way the promotion of elementary 
instruction in agriculture is carried on by the combined efforts of the 
public schools, of the patrons of the schools through their agricultural 
fairs, and of the Agricultural College. 

The college aspect of the work is under the immediate direction of Asso- 
ciate Prof. O. A. Morton. His entire time is devoted to it. His services 
are at the disposal of the schools and school patrons in helping to promote 
the teaching of agriculture. 

Demonstration Field Plots. — Aside from the work done by the Mas- 
sachusetts Agricultural College Agricultural Improvement Association, little 
has been done toward placing demonstration plots in different sections of 
the State. This work is to be developed during the coming year, however. 

Library Extension Work. — The college library has charge of this 
part of the Extension Service, which has to do with the circulation of 
agricultural literature throughout the State. This line of endeavor was 
instituted in 1910 by the sending out of four collections of books on agri- 
culture and related subjects. The demand for these traveling libraries 
has been such that the work has grown to splendid proportions, there 
being now on hand a collection maintained, separate from the regular 
college library equipment, of nearly 600 books and pamphlets especially 
for this purpose. This book material is loaned out to the public libraries 
of the State upon request, and for such periods of time as may be regu- 
lated by supply and demand. Collections vary in size and character accord- 
ing to the nature of the need of the- locality. From January to October, 
1912, a total of 629 volumes were loaned to 37 libraries. 

Co-operation with Existing Organizations. — The aim of those in 
charge of the Extension Service has been, from the start, to co-operate 
with existing organizations so far as possible. During the past three 
years it has co-operated with the State Board of Agriculture, the State 
Board of Health, the State Dairy Bureau, the State Grange, the Boston 
Chamber of Commerce, the Springfield Board of Trade, 'the work of several 
of the various village improvement associations, the Tent Evangelis- 
tic Work in western Massachusetts, Federation of Churches of Massachu- 
setts, State Board of Education, Free Public Library Commission, Massachu- 
setts Civic League, State Board of Health, county work of Y. M. C. A., 
New England Home Economics Association, the Eussell Sage Foundation, 
the Board of Home Missions, besides men's clubs in churches, women's 
clubs, schools and other agencies. 

Co-operation with the United States Department of Agriculture. — 
Through the co-operation of the United States department it has been 
possible to place in Massachusetts a field agent whose duty it is • to visit 
farms and consult with the owners, aiding them in questions of farm 
management, and to conduct farm management investigations. 

District Field Agents. — It is hoped that the college will soon be able 
to have in each county of the State a field agent whose duty it will be to 
visit farmers in the county, bringing to them the best advice the experts 
at the college can give. 



1913. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 



103 



During the coining year Mr. A. W. Doolittle, superintendent of the Faunce 
Demonstration farm, Sandwich, . will serve the college on part time as 
field agent for Barnstable County. 

Information by Correspondence. — Besides these things already men- 
tioned thousands of helpful circulars and bulletins are printed and dis- 
tributed, hundreds are helped through personal visits to farms, and still 
larger numbers through letters of inquiry which always receive the most 
careful attention from every department of the institution. 

Pamphlets and bulletins are sent free to all who ask for them, and cor- 
respondence from any who desire such help as has been mentioned is 
gladly received. Address all communications to the Director of the Ex- 
tension Service, Massachusetts Agricultural College, Amherst, Mass. 



Statistics of the Extension Service for 1912. 



Enrollment in Short Courses. 



Ten Weeks' "Winter Course, 

Poultry Course, . 

Apple Packing School, 

Farmers' Week, . 

Beekeepers' Course, 

Polish Farmers' Day, . 

Conference for Rural Community Leaders, 



Correspondence Courses 
Present enrollment, ...... 

Courses completed and work dropped during year, 



Number given, 



131 

80 
40 
1,040 
10 
57 
184 



578 
175 



591 



Lectures. 

Approximate attendance, ....... 27,469 

Boys' and Girls' Clubs. 
Number of clubs, ........ 127 

Number of members, . . . . . . ... 13,462 



People reached 
during 1912. 



1,482 



753 



27,469 



13,462 



Massachusetts Agricultural College Agricultural Improvement Association. 



Members enrolled, 



137 



Dairy Improvement Associations. 



Members enrolled, 



55 



55 



Extension Schools. 



Total membership in five schools, 



500 



500 



Student Extension Work. 
Attendance each week at four evening schools, . 



80 



80 



Mailing List. 
Facts for Farmers, ........ 1 553 

Short Courses, . . . . . . . . . 3 764 

Total, 



5,317 



49,366 



General Information. 



General Information. 



A. FINANCIAL AND ADMINISTEATIVE. 
Student Expenses. 

Tuition. — Tuition is free to residents of Massachusetts. Students who 
are not residents of Massachusetts are charged a tuition fee of $40 a 
year. The tuition charged persons not citizens of the United States is 
$120 a year. Students entering from Massachusetts are required to file 
with the president a statement signed by either town or city clerk stating 
that the applicant's father is a legal resident of Massachusetts. 

Dormitories and Board. — The college has dormitory accommodations 
for about 62 students. The rooms in the dormitories are occupied by the 
upper classmen, hence new students find it necessary to room in private 
houses. The rooms in the college dormitories are unfurnished; for the 
most part they are arranged in suits of three, — one study room and two 
bed rooms. These rooms are heated by steam and lighted by electricity; 
they are cared for by students occupying them'. The dormitory rent for 
each person varies from $39 to $66 a year. The rent for furnished rooms 
in private houses ranges from $1.25 to $3 a week for each occupant. 
Correspondence in regard to rooms should be addressed to the dean of the 
college. 

Board may be obtained at the eollege dining hall. At present the price 
of board there is about $4 a week. Board is furnished at cost, the price 
being determined by adding 5 per cent, to the audited rate for the previous 
three months, and at the end of the period final settlement is made on the 
basis of actual cost. 

Expenses. 
The necessary college expenses are estimated as follows : — 

Tuition : citizens of Massachusetts free ; other citizens of the 
United States, $40 a year; foreigners, $120 a year. 

Room in college dormitories or in private houses 
Board in college dining hall, $4 a week, . 
Laundry, 50 cents to 85 cents a week, 
Military uniform, first year, 
Laboratory fees, ..... 

Books, stationery and other miscellaneous, 



Low. 
$39 00 
144 00 

18 00 

13 50 
2 00 

23 50 



High. 


$110 


00 


144 


00 


30 


00 


13 


50 


20 


00 


32 


50 



$240 00 $350 00 

Other Expenses. — Prospective students should understand that the 
above estimates cover expenses which may be called strictly college ex- 
penses, and that there are other financial obligations voluntarily placed 



108 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



[Jan. 



upon students which they should expect to meet. Chief among these are 
class assessments and taxes levied for maintenance of various organiza- 
tions, such as the Social Union, Athletic Association, weekly publications, 
etc. Such expenses vary from $15 to $30 a year. Additional financial 
responsibility is also assumed by students joining a fraternity or entering 
into other social activities of the college. Students rooming in college dor- 
mitories are obliged to equip their own rooms with furniture. The 
college assumes no responsibility in regard to the safe keeping of student 
furniture in dormitories either during the college term or vacations, except 
under such special arrangement as may be made with the treasurer. Be- 
sides the amount necessary for clothes and traveling, the economical student 
will probably spend between $250 and $350 per year. 

Initial Charges. 
At the opening of the college year, before students are registered in their 
classes, the following charges are payable at the treasurer's office : — 



Freshmen. 



Sophomores 



Juniors and 

Seniors. 



Board (if at college dining hall) four weeks in advance, 
Subscription to " Signal " (college paper) , J 
Assessment for support of Social Union, 
Laboratory fees: — 

Chemistry 

Zoology, 

For elective subjects 

Military uniform, 

Room rent (if in college dormitory) 

Student tax for support of athletics, 1 



$16 00 
1 50 
1 50 

5 00 



13 35 



§16 00 
1 50 
1 50 



2 00 



00 



00 



$16 00 
1 50 
1 50 



1 00-10 00 



19 50-33 00 

8:oo 



$45 35 



$29 00 



$47 50-$70 00 



1 While this is not essentially a college charge, the treasurer of the college acts 
as collector for the student activity, and all students are expected to make the pay- 
ment as indicated. The subscription price of the " Signal " is fixed by the managers ; 
the amount of athletic tax by vote of the student body. 

Laboratory Fees. 

The principles observed in establishing laboratory fees are the require- 
ment that students pay for those materials actually used which cannot be 
supplied by the individual, and that the laboratory fees include a charge 
sufficient to guard against wanton waste and breakage. 

The fees as indicated below will become effective in September, 1913. 



Agronomy : — 
Course 3, 
Course 4, 
Course 5, 
Course 6, 



Per Semester. 
. $1 50 

50 

1 00 
1 00 



i9i: 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 



109 



Animal husbandry : — 

Courses 2 and 4, each, . 

Course 7, 
Botany: — 

Graduates, 

Courses 2 and 3, . 

Course 4, . . . 

Course 5, 

Courses 7, 9, 11, 13, . 
Chemistry : — 

Courses 1, 2, 7. 8, 13, 15, 

Courses 3, 4, 5, 6, 

Courses 9, 10, 11, 12, 14, 16 

Course 18, 
Entomology : — ■ 

Graduates, 

Entomology 3 and 4 each, 
Landscape gardening: — 

Landscape gardening 1, 

Landscape gardening 2, 

Landscape gardening 3, 

Landscape gardening 4, 

Landscape gardening 6, 

Landscape gardening 7, 

Landscape gardening 8, 

Drawing 1 and 2 each, . 
Pomology : — 

Pomology 3 and 4 each, 
Poiiltry husbandry : — 

Course 3, 

Course 4, 
Zoology : — 

Elementary 1, 

Invertebrate 3, 

Vertebrate, 



Per Semester. 


. $1 


00 




2 


00 




4 


00 




3 


00 




2 


00 




1 


00 




3 


00 




3 


00 




4 


00 




5 


00 




No fee. 




3 


00 




3 


00 




2 


50 




2 


50 




3 


00 




3 


00 




1 


00 




3 


00 




3 


00 




2 


50 




5 


00 




1 


50 




2 


00 




2 


00 




4 


00 




4 


00 



Student Aid. 

Self Help. — A number of students find opportunities for earning 
money without depending upon the college to furnish them with work, and 
many are obliged to find work of some sort to earn their way through 
college. A few men have met their entire expenses in this manner, many 
more have paid a large part of their expenses, and many have earned a 
small proportion of the cost of their college education; but the college 
recommends that no new student enter without having at least $150 with 
which to pay his way until he can establish himself in some regular work. 
The college does not encourage students to enter without money in the ex- 
pectation of earning their way entirely. The ordinary student will find 
it better either to work and accumulate money before coming to college, 
or to take more than four years in completing his college course, or, 
instead, to borrow money sufficient to carry him through. No student 
should undertake work that interferes with his studies, and students should 
remember that, owing to the large number of applications for employ- 
ment, no one man can receive a large amount of work through the college. 

So far as possible needy students will be employed in some department 
of the college. The divisions of agriculture and horticulture usually afford 
the most work, although there are several permanent janitorships available 



110 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [Jan. 

for students, and thirty or more students are employed at the dining hall. 
Applications for student labor should he made directly to the president. 
Applicants are required to present a certificate, signed by parent or guar- 
dian and by one of the selectmen or aldermen of the town or city in which 
they reside, showing that the applicant needs the assistance. Students 
whose deportment or class work is not satisfactory are not likely to be 
continued in student labor. The most desirable and responsible positions 
are naturally assigned to those needy students who have been in the in- 
stitution longest and who have demonstrated their need aind ability. 
Students, therefore, may find it rather difficult to obtain all the work 
they desire during their freshman year; as a matter of fact, however, any 
student who is capable of doing a variety of things, and who is a competent 
workman, usually finds little difficulty in obtaining all the work that he 
can do from the outset. 

Special Notice to Needy Students. — In the last year or two the 
demand for paid labor on the part of new students has far exceeded the 
amount of employment that the college can offer. The college cannot 
promise work to any student, particularly to freshmen; it accordingly 
urges prospective students who are dependent entirely upon their own 
efforts not to undertake the course before they have earned enough money 
to carry them through, or nearly through, the first year. 

Student Accounts. 

The following rules are enforced concerning student accounts : — 

No student will be allowed to graduate until all bills due the institution 
from him are paid. 

College charges, such as room rent, laboratory fees and tuition, must be 
paid in advance, at the beginning of each semester. This rule is strictly 
adhered to, and no student will be allowed to register in his class until 
such payments are made. 

Every student boarding at Draper Hall is required to pay at the beginning 
of each semester at least one month's board in advance; and no student 
will be allowed to continue to board at Draper Hall if at any time during 
the semester he is more than one week in arrears in his payment for board. 

All money due for student labor shall be applied on account toward any 
bills that a student may owe to the institution. 

Student Eelations. 

The customary high standard of college men in honor, manliness, self- 
respect and consideration for the rights of others constitutes the standards 
of student deportment. 

Any student known to be guilty of dishonest conduct or practice must 
be reported by the instructor to the president for discipline. 

The privileges of the college may be withdrawn from any student at any 
time, if such action is deemed advisable. 

It should be understood that the college, acting through its president or 
any administrative officer designated by him, distinctly reserves the right 
not only to suspend or dismiss students, but also to name conditions under 
which students may remain in the institution. For example, if a student 



1913.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. Ill 

is not doing creditable work he may not only be disciplined but lie may 
also be required to meet certain prescribed conditions in respect to his 
studies, even though under the foregoing rules his status as a student be 
not affected. The same provision applies equally to the matter of absences 
("cuts"). According to the rules a student is allowed a certain per- 
centage of absences from class and other exercises. This permission, 
which implies a privilege and not a right, may be withdrawn at any time 
for any cause. 

Similarly, also, it applies to participation in student activities. Though 
this will ordinarily be governed by the rules as already laid down, yet, if 
in the judgment of the college authorities a student is neglecting his work 
on account of these activities the privilege of participating in them may be 
withdrawn for such time as is considered necessary. Moreover, it may be 
withdrawn as a punishment for misconduct. Prospective students or their 
parents may, upon application, obtain a copy of the faculty rules governing 
student relations to the college. 

B. COLLEGE ACTIVITIES. 

General Exercises. 
Chapel exercises are as a rule held four mornings each week. On Wednes- 
day, instead of chapel an afternoon assembly is held, to which some promi- 
nent layman or professional man is invited to speak. The object of these 
assemblies is to bring to the students discussions of topics of present-day 
interest. A special chapel service on Sunday is usually held during the 
winter months. Students are required to attend these general exercises, 
although the president is authorized to excuse from chapel any student 
who may object to attendance thereon because of his religious scruples, 
provided his request for excuse therefrom is endorsed by his parent or 
guardian. 

Student Activities. 

A large number of student organizations furnish opportunity to students 
for work and leadership. 

The Massachusetts Agricultural College Social Union was established 
about four years ago. All students become members of the Union by pay- 
ing a small fee. The Union is designed to become the center of student 
interests. In North College it has a trophy room and a large lounging 
room for music, reading and study. In the basement of this building there 
is also a game room for pool and billiards. In the fall and winter months 
the Union gives a series of entertainments, free to the students and faculty. 

The College Senate is composed of representatives of the junior and 
senior classes. This body serves as a general director of under-graduate 
conduct, and represents before the faculty the interests of the student body. 

The M. A. C. Christian Association is active both socially and religiously. 
Under its direction voluntary Bible classes are conducted during the winter 
months. A Catholic Club has also been organized. 

The musical organizations include an orchestra, a mandolin club and a 
glee club. These furnish music for college meetings, and occasionally give 
concerts at the college and at other places. A military band is maintained 
as part of the cadet corps. 



112 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [Jan. 

A Dramatic Club has been organized, and each year presents a play. 

The Public Speaking Council represents the students' interest in debate 
and oratory. 

The Athletic Association represents in the college the interests of foot- 
ball, baseball, track, hockey and tennis. 

A Eifle Club has been organized for a few years. Teams representing 
this club have repeatedly won the intercollegiate championship of the 
country, both in indoor and outdoor contests. 

The college publications are the "Signal," published weekly by the 
student body, and the " Index," published annually by the members of the 
junior class. As a part of the work in journalism, students supply The 
Bay State Ruralist, a special page in the " Springfield Union." 

The Stockbridge Club is an organization of students especially interested 
in practical agriculture, horticulture and floriculture. Regular meetings 
are addressed by outside speakers, and members present papers and engage 
in discussions. 

Scientific clubs also exist in the departments of French, entomology and 
landscape gardening. 

C. ACADEMIC AND DEPARTMENTAL. 
Degrees. 

Those who complete a four-year course receive the degree of bachelor 
of science. The fee for graduation from the college is $5. 

Graduate students who complete the assigned courses will receive the 
degree of master of science upon the payment of a fee of $10. Credit 
may sometimes be allowed towards this degree for teaching or other advanced 
work done in some department of the college. 

Graduate students who complete the required three-yeaTS course of study, 
and present a satisfactory thesis, will be granted the degree of doctor of 
philisophy. 

Those to whom degrees are awarded must present themselves in person 
at commencement to receive them. No honorary degrees are conferred. 

The honorary fraternity of Phi Kappa Phi has a chapter at the agri- 
cultural college. Students are elected to membership to this fraternity 
on the basis of scholarship. Elections are made from the highest fifth of 
the senior class who have attained an average grade of at least 85 per cent, 
during their college course. 

Prizes. 

Prizes are given annually in several departments for excellence in study 
or for other special achievement. Prizes offered in 1912 are: — 

Agriculture. — The Grinnell prizes (first, second and third), given by 
the Hon. William Claflin of Boston in honor of George B. Grinnell, Esq., 
of New York, to those members of the 'senior class who pass the best, 
second best and third best examinations, oral and written, in theoretical and 
practical agriculture. They are $25, $15 and $10. 

Aximal Husbandry. — The F. Lothrup Ames' Prize, given by F. Lothrup 
Ames, Langwater Farms, North Easton, Mass., consisting of $150 a year, 
offered for a period of five years, beginning 1912, to be given to the three 



1913.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 113 

students standing highest in the work of advanced live-stock judging, and 
to be used in defraying their expenses incurred by participation in the 
students' judging contest at the National Dairy Show, Chicago. 

Botany. — The Hills prizes (amounting to $35), given by Henry P. 
Hills of Amherst, will be awarded to members of the senior class as fol- 
lows: for the best herbarium, $15; for the best collection of Massachusetts 
trees and shrubs, $10; for the best collection of Massachusetts woods, 
$10. No collection deemed unworthy of a prize will be considered. In 
1913, a prize of $5 is offered to that member of the sophomore class 
who presents the best herbarium of native flowering plants. 

General Improvement. — The Western Alumni Association prize ($25) 
is given to that member of the sophomore class who, during the first two 
years in college, has shown the greatest improvement in scholarship, char- 
acter and example. 

Public Speaking. — The Burnham prizes are awarded as follows : to 
the students delivering the best and second best declarations in the Burnham 
contest, $15 and $10, respectively. The preliminary contests in declamation 
are open, under certain restrictions, to freshmen and sophomores. 

The Flint prizes are awarded as follows: to the students delivering the 
best and second best orations in the Plint contest, a gold medal and $20 
and $15, respectively. The preliminary contests in oratory are open, under 
certain restrictions, to all regular students. 

The prizes in debate are awarded as follows : to each of the three students 
ranking highest in the annual debating contest, a gold medal and $15. 
The preliminary contests in debate are open, under certain restrictions, 
to all regular students. Interclass debates, with prizes, are also held 
annually. 

Military Diplomas. 
Military diplomas are given to those men receiving the degree of bachelor 
of science who by their work in the department of military science have 
shown themselves worthy of distinction. These diplomas recommend those 
receiving them for commissions in the United States army or the militia 
of the several States. 

Equipment. 

Agronomy. — The work in agronomy is carried on by means of lectures, 
laboratory work and field work. The laboratories are in the north wing 
of South College. The seed laboratory is equipped with samples of the 
different grains and seeds of economic importance in field culture, and with 
apparatus for the study and testing of these seeds, including microscopes 
and the apparatus necessary for viability and purity tests. The soil labora- 
tory is well equipped with apparatus for the study of the physical prop- 
erties of soils, including an electric centrifuge; an electric resistance ther- 
mometer for determining soil and other temperatures; evaporimeters and 
drying ovens; and good balances. Pof, the work in drainage there is 
available a surveyor's transit, a wye level, drainage levels, rods, steel 
tapes, surveyor's pins, and a set of drainage tools. The college farm 
may also be considered a part of the agronomy laboratory. 

Animal Husbandry. — The most important part of the equipment for 
laboratory work in animal husbandry is the new judging pavilion, which 



114 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [Jan. 

will be completed by Jan. 1, 1911. This will give new opportunities for 
practice work in management of live stock, together with demonstrations 
in judging. Another very essential part of the equipment for this depart- 
ment is the live stock of the college farm, which includes pure bred and 
grade Ayrshire, Guernsey, Holstein and Jersey cattle, French coach and 
Percheron horses, and Berkshire swine. A set of plaster-of-paris models 
of individuals of foreign and domestic breeds of horses, cattle, sheep and 
swine, and a collection of the different food stuffs available for the use 
of the New England farmer, are included in the equipment for this work. 

Botany. — The department of botany occupies Clark Hall, a brick build- 
ing 55 by 95 feet, two stories high, with basement and attic. It has two 
lecture rooms, one seating 154 and the other seating 72 people; one semi- 
nar and herbarium room; a large laboratory for sophomore and junior 
work, and one for senior work; and three rooms specially fitted for gradu- 
ate students. The experiment station laboratories devoted to botanical 
research are also in this building. A small museum contains material 
especially useful in the teaching and illustration of plant phenomena; and 
on the third floor is a collection of Massachusetts timber trees, specimens 
showing peculiar formations of plant growth, and various specimens il- 
lustrative of scientific methods of treating trees. 

The laboratories and lecture rooms are of modern construction, finely 
lighted and supplied with all necessary conveniences. The basement con- 
tains a bacteriological laboratory, a seed and soil room; and a convenient 
workshop provided with benches for wood and metal work, an electric 
motor, a power lathe, and other tools and appliances. In the senior 
laboratory is a room designed especially for physiological work; this labora- 
tory is well supplied also with apparatus for the study of simple phenomena 
in plant physiology, such as respiration, metabolism, transpiration, helio- 
tropism, etc. The herbarium contains 15,000 species of flowering plants and 
ferns, 1,200 sheets of mosses, 1,200 sheets of lichens and liverworts, and 
about 12,000 sheets of fungi. The laboratory is equipped with 90 modern 
compound microscopes and a number of dissecting microscopes, microtomes 
and a large series of charts. A conservatory 28 by 70 feet is connected 
with the laboratory. This is designed for experiment work and for housing 
material often needed in the laboratory. 

Chemistry. — The chemical department of the college now occupies the 
entire building previously known as the " old chapel." The basement is 
used for the storage of apparatus and chemicals. The first floor contains 
large laboratories devoted to qualitative and quantitative analysis and 
organic and physiological chemistry. The second floor is occupied by the 
general lecture room, by offices for the several members of the staff, by 
laboratories for physical chemistry and for beginners in quantitative analy- 
sis. The third floor has recently been fitted for work in general chemistry, 
and has desk room and hoods sufficient to accommodate 66 students at 
one time. Each place is supplied with reagents and apparatus for inde- 
pendent work. This floor is also occupied by a lecture room that will seat 
100 students. 

The entire laboratory is well equipped with the necessary apparatus 
and chemicals for all students who desire to perfect themselves as ex- 
pert chemists, or who wish to study chemistry as a supplement to some 



1913.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 115 

other line of practical or scientific work. The equipment includes a valu- 
able and growing collection of specimens and samples of minerals, soils, 
raw and manufactured fertilizers, food, milk products, fibers, various other 
vegetable and animal products and artificial preparations of mineral and 
organic compounds; and also a series of preparations for illustrating the 
various stages of different manufactures from raw material to finished 
product. 

Dairying. — Two large, well-drained, cement-floored rooms in the South 
College are used for dairy work. These are equipped with a milk heater, 
separators, coolers and aerators, a pasteurizer, ripening vats, churns, but- 
ter workers, a mechanical can washer, a sterilizer, and other small apparatus 
necessary to a well-equipped dairy or butter factory. A third room is 
equipped with hand and power Babcock milk-testing machines and other 
apparatus used for milk and butter testing. These rooms have individual 
lockers for students. The new sanitary dairy and stable give an oppor- 
tunity for practical laboratory work in the production and handling of 
certified milk. 

Dining Hall. — Draper Hall, a brick colonial building, equipped with 
the modern conveniences of a dining hall, was opened in 1903. The dining 
service is under the supervision of the college. 

Drawing. — Two rooms on the second floor of Wilder Hall are occupied 
by the classes in drawing. They are equipped with tables and adjustable 
drawing stands. The necessary materials and implements are provided. 
The equipment includes drawing models, and plaster casts of leaves, flowers, 
fruits, human and architectural details, and garden ornaments, two uni- 
versal drafting machines, an eidograph, centrolineads, a set of ship splines 
and French curves, complete water-color outfits, automatic crosshatchers 
and protractors. 

Entomology. — General Entomological Laboratories. — The equip- 
ment for work in entomology is perhaps unexcelled in this country. In 
the new fireproof entomogical and zoological building, first used in the 
fall of 1910, are fine lecture rooms, laboratories and museums for use in 
the different courses. The senior laboratory will accommodate 70 students 
at one time; a desk, equipped with compound microscope and accessories, 
together with glassware, reagents, etc., and supplied with electric light 
and gas is provided for each student. Dissecting microscopes, microtomes 
and other apparatus are available for use. The graduate laboratory is 
similarly equipped. It will accommodate 20 students. The large and 
rapidly growing collections of insects are in a room adjoining both labora- 
tories. In the library of the building is an excellent collection of the more 
important books and journals treating of entomology, and many more are 
accessible in the college library and in the private libraries of the pro- 
fessors, in all making available more than 25,000 volumes, many of which 
cannot be found elsewhere in the United States. A card catalogue giving 
references to the published articles on different insects contains more than 
60,000 cards, and is the largest index of its kind in the United States, 
and probably in the world. In the basement is a pump room where may be 
studied the construction of the different types of spray pump and methods 
of repairing them; hose, couplings, nozzles and the other parts of spraying 
outfits are provided, not only for examination but for use. In another 



116 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [Jan. 

room, provided with chemical desks and apparatus, methods for the deter- 
mination of the impurities and adulterations of insecticides are taught. 
As the insectary of the Massachusetts Agricultural Experiment Station is 
in the same building the facilities it offers are also available. A green- 
house, where plants infested with injurious insects are under observation 
and experimental treatment, is also open to students. Photographic rooms 
with cameras and other photographic apparatus are provided, and the large 
greenhouses, gardens, orchards and grounds of the college offer further 
opportunities for the study of injurious insects under natural conditions. 

Entomology. — Beekeeping. — For this work the main office, museum 
and lecture rooms are in the entomological building. There is also an 
apiary covering approximately two acres which will consist of about fifty 
colonies of bees in various types of hives and maintained for the several 
practical and experimental purposes. The apiary also includes a collec- 
tion of nectar-yielding plants representative of the native flora as well 
as of the more important nectar sources from other localities. Especial 
opportunity is therefore given for a study of this fundamental problem 
of forage. Upon the apiary site is an eight-room building (the first in 
the world erected exclusively for teaching beekeeping) modeled to meet 
both the requirements of teaching and of a practical apiary. This building 
contains a boiler room, capacious wintering cellar, wax extraction room, 
general carpenter and work shop, laboratory, office, honey extraction room 
and stock room. The beekeeping equipment also includes an unexcelled 
collection of apicultural implements, natural history specimens and other 
curiosities. Practically every device used in American apiculture is avail- 
able, it being the aim of the department to procure new inventions and 
implements as fast as they appear for the purpose of study and com- 
parison. Available to the students is a private library of apicultural 
literature consisting of upwards of 700 volumes and papers, possibly the 
most complete collection in the country. This entire equipment is ac- 
knowledged unique in model and in completeness for the United States 
and for the world. 

Farm Administration. — The college farm of 190 acres is under the 
supervision of the Department of Farm Administration, and furnishes 
demonstration material. It includes improved land, pasture land and a 
farm wood lot. The improved land illustrates the value of good culture 
and the best known methods for the maintenance of fertility. The work 
in this department includes the production of the common field crops, 
and the care and raising of the different classes of live stock mentioned 
under animal husbandry. The farm is equipped with suitable buildings 
and good machinery for the work carried on, of which the production of 
certified milk is an important branch. Several good farms in the vicinity, 
illustrating types of both special and general agriculture, may be inspected 
and studied. 

Floriculture. — The department of floriculture aims to give the student 
a thorough knowledge of all phases in greenhouse design and construction 
and greenhouse heating, and in the culture of florists' crops. It is in- 
tended to train men for commercial floriculture and for the management of 
conservatories on private estates and parks and in cemeteries. The course 
is outlined to combine theoretical, technical and practical work in the most 



1913.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 117 

comprehensive manner possible. Probably no agricultural college has a 
department of floriculture better equipped than this. The legislative ap- 
propriation of 1908 has made possible the erection of a durable, practical, 
commercial range, composed of palm, fern, orchid, violet, carnation, rose 
and students' houses. French Hall, with its large laboratories, class rooms 
and offices, furnishes excellent facilities for the purposes of instruction. 
Besides the new glass houses, there are older houses suitable for growing 
bedding plants and chrysanthemums, and frames for the growing of annual 
and herbaceous perennial plants, violets and pansies. Many excellent 
specimens of trees and shrubs are growing on the college grounds, furnish- 
ing valuable material for the study of plant materials. 

Forestry. — The department of forestry has an unusually complete 
equipment of the various instruments used in forest mensuration, forest 
mapping and engineering, timber estimating, log scaling, board measuring, 
etc.; a large assortment of boards illustrative of the various commercial 
woods found in the lumber markets. The State Forest Nursery, com- 
prising 6 acres of land and containing, approximately, 5,000,000 trees, 
transplants and seedlings is located on the college farm. Extensive forests 
containing every variety of tree common to New England are within walk- 
ing distance of the college. The college campus affords an arboretum con- 
taining an exceptionally large number of trees not native to New England. 
The library contains complete sets of government bulletins, circulars, State 
reports and all the best books on forestry subjects. 

Geology. — A large, well-lighted laboratory for geology, 27 by 50 feet, 
is in the basement of the new building for entomology, zoology and 
geology. This is equipped with cabinets, models, charts and a teaching 
collection of rocks. It has a seating capacity of 50 persons. Adjoining 
this is a smaller laboratory, 21 by 27 feet, for mineralogy, supplied with 
gas and cabinets for models, crystals and minerals. There is also a small 
laboratory for grinding thin sections, and a private laboratory, 6 by 19 
feet, for analysis work. The geological museum is 27 by 48 feet. It has 
six large cases for exhibition purposes. 

The equipment for geology is being enlarged. At present, in addition 
to the general items mentioned above, it consists of a petrographic micro- 
scope, an illustrative series of thin sections, a small collection of in- 
vertebrate fossils, some casts of vertebrate fossils, a collection of the 
building stones of Massachusetts, and a duplicate set of the Edward Hitch- 
cock survey collection of the rocks and minerals of Massachusetts. 

Heating, Lighting and Power. — The college supplies its own light, 
heat and power, including electricity for the night lighting of the campus 
and its approaches. The machinery of the barn, the dairy and other build- 
ings is operated by electricity generated at the power-house. The col- 
lege has also a machine shop. 

Landscape Gardening. — The work in landscape gardening is developed 
in a strong technical four-year course; the first two years are occupied with 
required studies, including botany, horticulture, surveying and mathematics, 
and the last two years are devoted to more specialized studies in landscape 
gardening, arboriculture, floriculture, entomology, botany and mathematics. 
The environment is unusually favorable. The strictly technical work in 
landscape gardening is taught in light and comfortable drafting rooms, 



118 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [Jan. 

fully furnished with instruments and accessories for thorough work. There 
is a well-selected library, and the equipment of surveying and drafting 
instruments is unusually complete and practical. 

Library. — The library — stack room, reading room and office — occupies 
the entire lower floor of the library-chapel building. It contains nearly 
34,000 volumes and a large number of pamphlets, hitherto inaccessible, 
but which are being put into good working order as fast as possible. Works 
of a scientific character predominate, but economics, literature and history 
are well represented and are receiving due attention. The reading room 
provides a variety of periodical literature, both technical and popular, 
encyclopedias and general reference books, and a select collection of works 
for general reading. 

The library is now being reclassified and recatalogued, to make the 
splendid collection of material here gathered together readily accessible 
and of the greatest working value. Every effort is being made toward 
developing the library into a vital intellectual center of college life, 
of equal value to every student, teacher and teaching department. In con- 
sequence, only the most cordial relations are cherished, and the fewest and 
most imperative rules concerning the circulation of books and deportment 
are enforced. 

Lectures are given to regular short course students to enable them to 
make the best use of the library. Emphasis is laid upon the proper use of 
the card catalogue, periodical indexes, bibliographies and guides; also, in 
general, assigned and class-room work, and essay and debate work. 

The library hours are from 7.45 a.m. to 9 p.m. every week day, and 
from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Sundays, in term time. Shorter hours prevail 
during vacations. 

Market Gardening. — The purpose of the courses in market gardening 
is to acquaint the student with the theories and practice of market garden- 
ing so that he will be able to carry on the business intelligently. The 
equipment available for practical work consists of 10 acres of good garden- 
ing land; a large collection of horse and hand garden tools; hot-beds and 
cold-frames; and lettuce, cucumber and tomato houses. The students there- 
fore have opportunity both to study and to practice the important branches 
of the business. Classes are taught in French Hall, a new building fitted 
with class rooms and a laboratory particularly equipped for floriculture 
and market gardening. A good library of works on vegetable gardening 
is available. 

Mathematics and Civil Engineering. — Surveying. — The department 
has a considerable number of the usual surveying instruments, with the 
use of which the students are required to become familiar by doing field 
work. Among the larger instruments are 2 plain compasses, a railroad 
compass with telescope, a surveyor's transit, 3 engineer's transits with 
vertical arc and level, a Brandis solar transit, a solar compass, an omnimeter 
with verniers reading to 10 seconds, adapted to geodetic work, a queen 
plane table, 3 wye levels, 2 dumpy levels, a builder's level, a sextant, a 
hand level, and a large assortment of leveling rods, flag poles, chains, 
tapes, etc. For drafting, a vernier protractor, a pantograph, .a parallel 
rule, etc., are available. The department also has a Fairbanks cement 
testing outfit. 



1913.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 119 

Military Science. — This department makes use of the campus for 
battalion drill, and has a special building in which there is a drill room 
60 by 135 feet, an armory, an office for the commandant, a field-gun and 
gallery practice room and a large bathroom. The national government 
supplies Krag-Jorgensen rifles, with complete equipments and ammunition. 
The State supplies instruments for the college band. Students are held 
responsible for all articles of public property in their possession. The 
college owns an excellent target range for rifle practice, lying a short 
distance out of the village. 

Physical Education. — The gymnasium and armory has a floor space 
of 5,000 square feet, and is 30 feet high, well lighted and ventilated. The 
room used for exercise and recreation is equipped with modern developing 
apparatus and two hand-ball courts, and is large enough for basket ball. 
The apparatus can quickly be removed to clear the floor. An out-door 
board track enables students to secure track practice through the winter. 
Steel lockers and bathrooms have been installed in North and South col- 
leges, and the gymnasium has been fitted with a bathroom. The gymnasium 
is open from 9 a.m. to 10 p.m., and exercise may be taken at such hours 
as do not conflict with military drill or physical education classes. The 
regulation costume for class exercise consists of a white track suit and white, 
rubber-sole shoes. 

Physics. — Among the apparatus in use for instruction in general 
physics are a set of United States standard weights and measures, pre- 
cision balances, a sphero meter, vernier calipers, a projection lantern, etc.; 
in mechanics, a seconds clock systems of pulleys and levers, and apparatus 
to illustrate the laws of falling bodies and motion on an inclined plane, 
and the phenomena connected with the mechanics of liquids and gases. 
The department is equipped with the usual apparatus for lecture illustra- 
tion in heat, light and sound; in electricity, the equipment consists of 
apparatus for both lecture illustration and laboratory work, including a 
full set of Weston ammeters and volt meters, a Carhart-Clark standard 
cell, a Mascart quadrant electrometer, a Siemens electro-dynamometer, 
and reflecting galvanometers and Wheatstone bridges for ordinary deter- 
minations of currents and resistances. 

Pomology. — The department of pomology has 10 acres of orchard, in- 
cluding apple, pear, peach, plum, cherry and quince trees. Of particular 
interest is the large collection of these fruits on the various dwarf stocks, 
showing many types of training. The recent revival of interest in dwarf 
fruits makes these dwarf orchards of especial value to students. There 
is also a commercial vineyard and a smaller one; in these are shown the 
principal types of trellis and the leading methods of training grapes. 
Several acres are used in growing the various kinds of small fruits, such 
as strawberries, raspberries, blackberries, currants and gooseberries. There 
are also extensive nurseries, where all of these various types of fruits are 
grown, in which students may see them in all stages of development. 

The department has a good equipment of orchard and nursery tools of 
all the principal types, the use of which enables students to learn the value 
of each type. For other orchard operations, such as spraying and pruning, 
the most approved makes of pumps, nozzles, pruning saws, knives, etc., aTe 
provided. For laboratory work in systematic pomology there is a collec- 



120 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [Jan. 

tion of more than 100 wax models of apples and plums in natural colors, 
which are particularly valuable in identifying varieties of these fruits un- 
known to the student. The laboratory is also furnished with a large number 
of reference books on pomology; and fruit in a fresh condition is available 
in great variety, not only from the college orchards but from other parts 
of Massachusetts and from many other States. In 1909-10, for instance, 
apples for class use were received from British Columbia, Ontario, Quebec, 
Nova Scotia, Iowa, Wisconsin, Michigan, Connecticut, New York, Oklahoma, 
Kansas, Colorado, Oregon, New Jersey and Vermont, besides collections of 
grapes from California and citrus fruit from Florida and Texas. 

Poultry Husbandry. — The poultry plant consists of about 9 acres of 
land sloping gently to the west. The soil is a fine, rich, sandy loam, well 
drained. At present the buildings consist of an incubator cellar, 32 by 
34 feet, with a capacity of 4,000 eggs, over which is a demonstration build- 
ing; a pipe brood house (open-pipe system), 14 by 72 feet, which will 
accommodate 1,200 chickens; a long laying house, 14 by 180 feet, which 
accommodates 500 layers and furnishes facilities for student work in pen 
management; a laboratory, 14 by 80 feet, for killing, picking, dressing, 
crate fattening, cramming, etc.; a storage building, 28 by 42 feet, for 
experimental incubation, poultry carpentry, poultry mechanics and storage; 
an experimental breeding house, 18 by 60 feet; the 6 old experiment 
station buildings, each 12 by 18 feet, to be used as breeding houses, and 
11 colony brooder houses. Instruction in this department is given in the 
form of lectures, demonstrations and practical work. The practical work 
consists of poultry, carpentry, caponizing, killing, picking, dressing, pack- 
ing and selling poultry; pen management and fattening; running incuba- 
tors and brooders, etc. At present the stock consists of 20 leading varie- 
ties of poultry. The aim of the department is to keep good specimens of 
all the most popular varieties of chicken, ducks and geese, so that a 
thorough course in poultry judging may be given, and that visitors may 
find the inspection of our stock an education in itself. 

Public Speaking. — In connection with the work in public speaking, 
three regular contests are held during the year. The Burnham contest in 
declamation is open to freshmen and sophomores ; the Flint contest in oratory 
and the annual debating contest are open (under restrictions) to all 
regular students. These contests furnish a very practical and necessary 
experience to all students interested in improving themselves in the art of 
public speaking. Prizes are given for excellence in the contests. Inter- 
college contests are arranged by the Public Speaking Council. One credit 
is given, except to freshmen, for a year of work in the College Debating 
Club. 

Veterinary Science and Bacteriology. — The department of veterinary 
science and bacteriology occupies a modern laboratory and hospital stable, 
built in accordance with the latest principles of sanitation. Every pre- 
caution has been taken in the arrangement of details to prevent the spread 
of disease, and to provide for effective heating, lighting, ventilation and 
disinfection. 

The main building contains a large working laboratory for student use, 
and several small private laboratories for special work. There are a lecture 
hall, a museum, a demonstration room, a photographing room and a work 
shop. The hospital stable contains a pharmacy, an operating hall, a post- 



1913.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 121 

mortem and dissecting room, a poultry section, a section for cats and dogs, 
and 6 sections, separated from each other, for horses, cattle, sheep and 
swine. The laboratory equipment consists of a dissectible Auzoux model 
of the horse and Auzoux models of the foot and the leg, showing the 
anatomy and the diseases of every part. The laboratories also have modern, 
high-power microscopes, microtomes, incubators and sterilizers, for work 
in bacteriology and parasitology. There are skeletons of the horse, the 
cow, the sheep, the dog and the pig, and a growing collection of anatomi- 
cal and pathological specimens. The lecture room is provided with numerous 
maps, charts aud diagrams. 

Zoology. — The college offers increased facilities for the study of zoology. 
In the new building for entomology, zoology and geology are spacious 
laboratories for both undergraduate and graduate work. On the first floor 
is a large sophomore laboratory, 27 by 100 feet, with a present seating 
capacity of 100 persons. Adjoining this is a smaller room, 20 by 27 feet, 
for junior and senior courses. On the second floor is a laboratory, 20 by 
32 feet, for advanced work. All laboratories are equipped with gas. The 
equipment consists of 80 compound microscopes and accessories, 70 dis- 
secting microscopes, microtomes and accessories, paraffine baths, incubator, 
dissecting instruments, glassware and other necessary apparatus. 

The large amphitheater lecture hall is used jointly by the departments 
of entomology and zoology-geology. It is equipped with charts and 
models. The zoological museum is drawn upon at all times for illustrative 
material. The zoological museum is 27 by 48 feet. The main room is on 
the first floor of the building. Above this, on a level with the second floor, 
is a large gallery. On the main floor are 8 large wall cases and 5 large 
floor cases for exhibition purposes. The gallery has 1 one large wall case 
and 2 floor cases with space for 10 additional cases. The zoological col- 
lection consists of nearly 12,000 specimens. All the chief phyla are repre- 
sented. Adjoining the museum is a preparator's room for the curator. The 
museum is open to the public from 1 to 5 p.m. on Saturdays, and on other 
week days from 3 to 6 p.m. The curator is Associate Professor Gordon. 

Prizes and Awards, 1912. 

Grinnell Prizes. — The Grinnell prizes, given by the Hon. William 
Claflin of Boston in honor of George B. Grinnell, Esq., of New York, to 
those members of the senior class who pass the best, second best and third 
best examinations, oral and written, in theoretical and practical agri- 
culture, were awarded as follows: — 

First prize, $25, to Benjamin Gilbert Southwick. 

Second prize, $15, to Francis Spink Madison. 

Third prize, $10, to Eric Nichols Boland. 

Botanical Prizes. — The Hills prizes, given by Henry F. Hills of 
Amherst, were awarded to members of the senior class as follows: — 

A. — For the best herbarium, $15, to Eay Ethan Torrey. 

B. — For the best collection of Massachusetts trees and shrubs, $10, to 
Eay Ethan Torrey. 

C. — For the best collection of Massachusetts woods, $10, to Eay Ethan 
Torrey. 

Special sophomore prize for the best herbarium, $5, to Ernest Elwood 
Stanford. 



122 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [Jan. 

Honorary mention made of Eaymond Edward Nute. 

General Improvement. — The Western Alumni Association prize, given 
to that member of the sophomore class who during his first two years 
in college has shown the greatest improvement in scholarship, character 
and example, was awarded as follows : — 

Twenty-five dollars to Eoland Alfred Payne. 

Public Speaking. — The Burnham prizes, given to the students deliver- 
ing the best and second best declarations, were awarded as follows: — 

First prize, $15, to Leroy Everett HasMns. 

Second prize, $10, to Isaac Barney Simon. 

The Flint prizes, given to the students delivering the best and second 
best orations, were awarded as follows : — 

First prize, a gold medal and $20, to Dau Yang Lin. 

Second prize, a gold medal and $15, to Woon Young Chum. 

Debating. — The prizes in the annual debate were awarded as fol- 
lows: — 

Fifteen dollars and a gold medal, to Theodore Joseph Moreau. 

Fifteen dollars and a gold medal, to Benjamin Franklin Hubert. 

Fifteen dollars and a gold medal, to Thomas Hemenway. 

The prizes in the interelass debate were awarded as follows: — 

To the team representing the Class of 1912, consisting of Theodore 
Joseph Moreau, Benjamin Franklin Hubert, Thomas Hemenway. 

Each member of the above team was awarded a silver cup. 

Military Honors. — The following-named cadet officers have been re- 
ported to the Adjutant-General of the United States army and to the 
Adjutant-General of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, being efficient 
in military science and tactics and graduating therein with highest 
honors : — 

Cadet Col. Marshall Cotting Pratt. 

Cadet Maj. Eric Nichols Boland. 

Cadet Capt. Benjamin Gilbert Southwick. 

Cadet Capt. Francis Spink Madison. 

Cadet Capt. Thomas Hemenway. 

Secretaries op Alumni Associations and Classes. 
Alumni Secretaries' Association of the Massachusetts Agricultural Col- 
lege. 
Secretary: Ealph J. Watts, 1907, Amherst, Mass. 
Association Alumni of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Secretary. Sidney B. Haskell, 1904, Amherst, Mass. 
Local Alumni Association of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Secretary: Sidney B. Haskell, 1904, Amherst, Mass. 
Alumni Club of Massachusetts. 

Clerh: H. Linwood White, 1909, 136 State House, Boston, Mass. 
Connecticut Valley Association of the Massachusetts Agricultural Col- 
lege. 
Secretary: Charles L. Brown, 1894, 870 State Street, Springfield, 
Mass. 
Massachusetts Agricultural College Club of New York. 

Secretary: John Ashburton Cutter, 1882, 262 West 77th Street, 
New York, N. Y. 



1913.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 



123 



Massachusetts Agricultural College Club of Washington, D. C. 

Secretary: Clarence H. Geiffin, 1904, 1864 Park Eoad, Washington, 
D. C. 
Western Alumni Association of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Secretary: Charles A. Tirrell, 1906, 4012 Perry Street, Chicago, 111. 
Massachusetts Agricultural College Pacific Coast Alumni Association. 

Secretary: Thomas F. Hunt, 1905, Berkeley, Cal. 

Class Secretaries. 



Class of 


Secretary. 


Secretary's Address. 


1871 


E. E. Thompson, 


5 Jacques Avenue, Worcester, Mass. 


1872 


F. E. Kimball, . 


8 John Street, Worcester, Mass. 


1873 


C. Wellington, 


Amherst, Mass. 


1874 


D. G. Hitchcock, 


Warren, Mass. 


1875 


M. Bunker, 


Newton, Mass. 


1876 


C. Fred Deuel, . 


Amherst, Mass. 


1877 


Atherton Clark, . 


Newton, Mass. 


1878 


C. O. Lovell, 


5 Bromfield Street, Boston, Mass. 


1879 


R. W. Swan, 


41 Pleasant Street, Worcester, Mass. 


1880 


Alvan Fowler, 


413 Post Office Building, Philadelphia, Pa. 


1881 


J. L. Hills, . 


59 North Prospect Street, Burlington, Vt. 


1882 


G. D. Howe, 


25 Winter Street, Bangor, Me. 


1883 


J. B. Lindsey, 


Amherst, Mass. 


1884 


- 


_ 


1885 


E. W. Allen, 


1923 Biltmore Street, Washington, D. C. 


1886 


Dr. Winfield Ayres, 


616 Madison Avenue, New York City. 


1887 


F. H. Fowler, 


Shirley, Mass. 


1888 


H. C. Bliss, 


14 Mechanic Street, Attleborough, Mass. 


1889 


C. S. Crocker, . 


1003 South 25th Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 


1890 


David Barry, 


398 Walnut Street, Newtonville, Mass. 


1891 


H. T. Shores, 


177 Elm Street, Northampton, Mass. 


1892 


H. M. Thomson, 


Amherst, Mass. 


1893 


F. A. Smith, 


Turner Hill, Ipswich, Mass. 


1894 


S. F. Howard, 


Amherst, Mass. 


1895 


E. A. White, 


Amherst, Mass. 


1896 


A. S. Kinney, 


South Hadley, Mass. 


1897 


C. A. Peters, 


Amherst, Mass. 


1898 


- 


- 


1899 


D. A. Beaman, . 


Rio Piedras, Porto Rico. 


1900 


E. K. Atkins, 


15 Hubbard Avenue, Northampton, Mass. 


1901 


J. H. Chickering, 


Dover, Mass. 


1902 


H. L. Knight, 


1420 Buchanan Street, Washington, D. C. 


1903 


G. D. Jones, 


North Amherst, Mass. 


1904 


P. F. Staples, 


North Grafton, Mass. 


1905 


A. D. Taylor, 


1101 Tremont Building, Boston, Mass. 


1906 


Richard Wellington, 


Geneva, N. Y. 


1907 


Clinton King, 


6 Beacon Street, Boston, Mass. 


1908 


J. A. Hyslop, 


860 North Mulberry Street, Hagerstown, Md. 


1909 


O. B. Briggs, 


1015 Fidelity Building, Baltimore, Md. 


1910 


F. L. Thomas, . 


Amherst, Mass. 


1911 


L. M. Johnson, . 


Newtown, Conn. 


1912 


F. S. Madison, . 


East Greenwich, R. I. 



Degrees Conferred and 
Roll of Students. 



Degrees Conferred -1912. 



Doctor of Philosophy. 
Bartlett, Oscar Christopher, Westhampton. Massachusetts Agricultural College, B.Sc, 1909. 



Master of Science. 
McLaine, Leonard Septimus, New York, N. Y. Massachusetts Agricultural College, B.Sc, 

1910. 



Bachelor op Science (B.Sc). 



Ackerman, Arthur John, 
Baker, Horace Mitchell, 
Beals, Carlos Loring, 
Beers, Rowland Trowbridge, 
Bent, William Richard, 
Bodfish, Edward Hill, . 
Boland, Eric Nichols, . 
Brett, Alden Chase, 
Brown, Merle Raymond, 
Burnham, Arthur James, 
Burr, Frederick Huntington, 
Carpenter, Jesse, Jr., 
Castle, Fred Arlo, 
Clapp, Raymond Kingsley, 
Curran, Daniel Joseph, 
Deming, Winfred Griswold, 
Dodge, Albert Wesley, . 
Fagerstrom, Leon Emanuel, 
Fisherdick, Warren Francis, 
Fitts, Frank Orus, 
Fitzgerald, John Joseph, 
Fowler, George Scott, . 
Gallagher, James Andrew, 
Gaskill, Lewis Warren, 
Gelinas, Louis Edmond, 
Gibbs, Robert Morey, . 
Gibson, Lester Earl, 
Gray, Frank Leonard, . 
Hall, Henry Bass, 
Hall, Horace Whitney, . 
Hallowell, Royal Norton, 
Hamblin, Stephen Francis, 
Harlow, Joseph Alvin, . 
Heald, Jay Morrill, 
Hemenway, Thomas, 
Hickey, Francis Benedict, 
Hills, Frank Burrows, . 
Holland, Henry Lucius, 
Hubert, Benjamin Franklin, 
Kingsbury, Arthur French, 
Lamson, Robert Ward, 
Lin, Dau Yang, . 
Lodge, Charles Albert, . 
Madison, Francis Spink, 



Worcester. 

Selbyville, Del. 

Sunderland. 

Billerica. 

Marlborough. 

West Barnstable. 

South Boston. 

North Abington. 

Greenwich Village. 

Holyoke. 

Worthington. 

Attleborough. 

Roseburg, Ore. 

Westhampton. 

Marlborough. 

Wethersfield, Conn. 

South Hamilton. 

Worcester. 

Amherst. 

North Amherst. 

Holyoke. 

Wayland. 

North Wilmington. 

Hopedale. 

North Adams. 

Chester. 

Melrose. 

East Boston. 

Northampton. 

Newton Centre. 

Jamaica Plain. 

Marstons Mills. 

Turners Falls. 

Watertown. 

Nashua, N. H. 

Brockton. 

Bernardston. 

Amherst. 

White Plains, Ga. 

Medfield. 

Amherst. 

Shanghai, China. 

Manchester. 

East Greenwich, R. I 



128 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



[Jan. 



Martin, James Francis, 
McGarr, Thomas Anthony, 
Merkle, George Edward, 
Merrill, Fred Sawyer, . 
Moreau, Theodore Joseph, 
Mueller, Alfred Frederick, 
Noyes, Harry Alfred, . 
O'Flynn, George Bernhard, 
Parker, Ralph Robinson, 
Pearson, Charles Cornish, 
Peckham, Curtis, 
Philbrick, William Edwin, 
Pierpont, John Edwards, 
Pratt, Marshall Cotting, 
Puffer, Stephen Perry, . 
Raymond, Arthur Nathaniel, 
Reed, Robert Edward, . 
Robinson, Earle Johnson, 
Rockwood, Lawrence Peck, 
Sanctuary, William Crocker, 
Sellew, Lewis Raymond, 
Shaw, Ezra Ingram, 
Southwick, Benjamin Gilbert 
Stack, Herbert James, . 
Terry, Leon, 
Torrey, Ray Ethan, 
Tower, Daniel Gordon, 
Tupper, George Wilbur, 
Turner, Howard Archibald, 
Wales, Robert Webster, 
Warner, Roger Andrew, 
Weaver, William Jack, . 
Whitney, Charles Everett, 
Wilbur, Emory Sherman, 
Wilde, Earle Irving, 
Williams, Edward Roger, 
Williams, Silas, 
Wood, Howard Holmes, 
Young, Edwin Burnham, 



Amherst. 

Worcester. 

Amherst. 

Danvers. 

Turners Falls. 

Jamaica Plain. 

Marlborough. 

Worcester. 

Maiden. 

Arlington. 

New Bedford. 

Taunton. 

Williamsburg. 

Holderness, N. H. 

North Amherst. 

Leominster. 

Abington. 

Hingham. 

Waterbury. Conn. 

Amherst. 

Natick, 

Amherst. 

Buckland. 

Conway. 

Springfield. 

North Leverett. 

Roxbury. 

Roxbury. 

Dorchester. 

North Abington. 

Sunderland. 

Alandar. 

Wakefield. 

East Wareham. 

Taunton. 

Concord. 

Fall River. 

Shelburne Falls. 

Dorchester. 



1913. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 



129 



Eoll of Students. 



Adams, Winford Frederick, x 
Allen, Harry Willis, 
Anderson, Osear Gustaf, 
Angier, Harris William, 
Baird, Harry Albert, 1 . 
Baker, Dean Foster, 
Barber, George Ware, x 
Bevan, Laurence Algur, x 
Birdsall, Webster Jennings, x 
Borden, Ralph James, . 
Brewer, Charlesworth Herbert 
Brown, Herbert Augustine, 
Bullard, Alvan Henry, . 
Burby, Lawrence Walter, 
Bursley, Harold Barrows, 
Carver, John Stuart, 
Clark, Norman Russell, 
Cobb, Joseph Boyd, l . 
Cole, Arlin Tower, 
Cole, Flora Atwood, 
Coleman, Isaac, 1 . 
Cooper, Everett Hanson, 1 
Cory, Harold, 
Covill, Joseph Warren, * 
Cristman, Clyde Edward, 1 
Culley, Frank Hamilton, 
Curtis, Harold William, 1 
Daniel, Edward Stephen Coen 
Dayton, James Wilson, 
Dooley, Thomas Patrick, 
Drury, Lewis Floyd, 
Edminster, Albert Franklin, 
Eisenhaure, John Louis, l 
Ellis, Benjamin Ward, . 
Ells, Gordon Waterman, 
Fay, Robert Sedgwick, 
Forbush, Wallace Clifford, 
French, James Dudley, 
Gaskill, Ralph Hicks, . 
Gore, Harold Martin, . 
Greenleaf, George Freeman, 
Griggs, Frederick David, 
Harris, Burton Adams, 
Hasey, Willard Harrison, J 
Hatch, Herbert Tilden, 
Headle, Herbert Wallace, 
Headle, Marshall, 
Holden, James Loomis, 
Howe, Glover Elbridge, 



Senior Class. 

East. Leverett, 
West Pelham, 
East Pepperell, 
Westborough, 
Somerville, . 
Fairhaven, . 
Hyde Park, . 
Newtonville, 
Otego, N.Y., 
Fall River, . 
Mt. Vernon, N.Y., 
Saxonville, . 
South Framingham 
Chicopee Falls, 
Peabody, 
Roslindale, . 
Millbury, 
Chicopee Falls, 
West Chesterfield, 
Newton, 
Amherst, 
Greenwood, . 

Rutherford, N. J., 
Roxbury, 

Dalton, 

Marshalltown, la., 

Belchertown, 

Osterville, 

Georgetown, Conn 

South Boston, 

Rutland, 

Brooklyn, N. Y., 

North Reading, 

Plymouth, 

Haverhill, 

Monson, 

Rutland, 

Hyde Park, 

Amherst, 

Wollaston, 

Brockton, 

Chicopee Falls, 

Wethersfield, Conn 

Campello, 

Atlantic, 

Bolton, 

Bolton, 

Palmer, 

Marlborough, 



Theta Chi House. 
West Pelham. 
Entomological Building. 
South College Tower. 

4 South College. 
15 North College. 
13 North College. 
15 North College. 
Kappa Sigma House. 
7 North College. 

C. S. C. House. 
Brooks Farm. 

3 North College. 
Theta Chi House. 

5 North College. 
C. S. C. House. 
Theta Chi House. 

5 North College. 
2 North College. 
Draper Hall. 

12 North College. 
11 North College. 
15 Beston Street. 
7 South College. 

2 North College. 
77 Pleasant Street. 
Entomology Building. 

7 South College. 

4 North College. 

6 North College. 
120 Pleasant Street. 

5 South College. 

3 North College. 
Kappa Sigma House. 
5 South College. 

84 Pleasant Street. 
79 Pleasant Street. 

8 South College. 
15 Hallock Street. 
11 South College. 
21 Fearing Street. 
18 South College. 
11 North College. 
C. S. C. House. 

East Experiment Station. 
North College. 
French Hall. 
3 North College. 
11 South College. 



1 Work incomplete. 



130 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



[Jan. 



Howe, Ralph Wesley, . 

Huntington, Samuel Percy, 

Hutchings, Herbert Colby, x 

Hyland, Harold Wilson, i 

Jones, Harold Frederic, 

Jordan, Simon Miller, 1 . 

Kelley, Albert Joseph, . 

Kelley, Bernard Jenkins, 

Kenney, Frederick Alfred, 1 

Lesure, John Warren Thomas, 

Little, Willard Stone, 1 . 

Lowry, Quincy Shaw, * . 

Lundgren, Arthur Robert, J 

Lyon, Harold, 

Macone, Joseph Augustine, 

Mallett, George Alfred, 

Matz, Julius, 1 

Mayer, John Lawrence, 

McDougall, Allister Francis, 

Moir, WilUam Stuart, . 

Murray, Joseph "Wilbur, 

Neal, Ralph Thomas, . 

Nichols, Norman Joseph, 

O'Brien, James Leo, 

Packard, Clyde Monroe, 

Pease, Lester Newton, . 

Pillsbury, Joseph James, 1 

Post, George Atwell, l . 

Roehrs, Herman Theodore, 

Rosebrooks, Walter Edwin, 1 

Samson, Stuart Dodds, 

Selden, John Lincoln, . 

Serex, Paul, Jr., . 

Sheehan, Dennis Anthony, 1 

Shute, Carl August, l . 

Streeter, Charles Marsh, 

Thayer, Clark Leonard, 

Tucker, Waldo Guy, 

Van Zwaluwenburg, Reyer Herman, 

Walker, Charles Dexter, 

Whitney, Francis Wellington, ; 

Zabriskie, George, 2d, l 



East Dover, Vt., 

Lynn, . 

South Amherst, 

Weymouth, . 

Campello, 

Rutherford, N. J., 

Roxbury, 

Harwichport, 

Charlestown, 

Fitchburg, 

Newburyport, 

Canton, 

Orange, 

Somerville, . 

Concord, 

Bridgeport, Conn., 

Lynn, . 

South Boston, 

Westford, 

Boston, 

Holyoke, 

Mattapan, . 

Everett, 

Wayland, 

Springfield, . 

Meriden, Conn., 

West Bridgewater, 

Richmond Hill, N, Y., 

New York, N. Y., 

Essex, . 

Grand Isle, Vt., 

Northampton, 

Jamaica Plain, 

South Lincoln, 

Quincy, 111., . 

Brimfield, 

Smith's, 

Lynn, . 

Rutherford, N. J., 

Greenwich Village, 

Wellesley, 

New York, N. Y., 



Wilder Hall. 

12 South College. 
9 North College. 
Old Insectary. 

West Experiment Station. 
9 South College. 
1 North College. 
Brooks Farm. 
South College Tower. 
Flint Laboratory. 
6 South College. 
6 South College. 
Theta Chi House. 

13 Phillips Street. 
4 South College. 

9 North College. 
112 Pleasant Street. 
1 North College. 

18 South College. 
Theta Chi House. 
Kappa Sigma House. 
Old Insectary. 
Physics Building. 

10 South College. 
84 Pleasant Street. 
17 South College. 

8 South Prospect St. 
Theta Chi House. 
Kappa Sigma House. 

14 North College. 
12 South College. 
21 Fearing Street. 
14 North College. 
1 North College. 
14 South College. 
79 Pleasant Street. 
8 North College. 
Physics Building. 
17 South College. 
14 South College. 
4 North College. 

8 South College. 



Abbott, Leslie Elmer, . 
Allen, Carl Murdough, . 
Anderson, Leslie Oscar, 1 
Baker, Warren Sears, . 
Black, Harold Cotting, l 
Blake, Ralph Cedric, l . 
Bokelund, Chester Story, 1 
Bradley, John Watling, 1 
Bragg, Ralph Stanley, . 
Brewer, Harold William, x 
Brooks, Arthur Winslow, 
Brown, Harry Dunlap, 1 
Calvert, Melville Bradford, 
Campbell, Malcolm David, 
Christie, Edward Wheeler, 
Churchill, George Clarence, 
Clark, Ernest Samuel, Jr., 



Juniob Class. 

Sandwich, 

Holyoke, 

Concord, 

Wollaston, . 

Falmouth, 

Wollaston, . 

Worcester, . 

Groton, 

Milford, 

Mount Vernon, N.Y., 

Enfield, 

Lowell, 

New London, Conn., 

Still River, . 

North Adams, 

Worcester, . 

Tolland, 



10 North College. 

87 Pleasant Street. 
101 Pleasant Street. 
8 South College. 
Kappa Sigma House. 
15 Hallock Street. 

10 South College. 

88 Pleasant Street. 
Care of Professor White. 
C. S. C. House. 

79 Pleasant Street. 
Kappa Sigma House. 
58 Pleasant Street. 
Poultry Building. 
P. O. Box 152. 
58 Pleasant Street. 
82 Pleasant Street. 



■ Work incomplete. 



1913. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 



131 



Clay, Harold Johnson, . 
Clegg, Frank Jackson, x 
Coe, Alfred Lynn, 
Cole, Herbert Elmer, 1 . 
Coleman, David Augustus, 
Davies, Lloyd Garrison, 
Davis, Ralph Edward, 1 
Davis, William Ashmun, 
Dearing, Newton Howard, • 
Demond, Robert Norton, 
Dexter, Evans King, l . 
Dunbar, Erving "Walker, 
Edgerton, Almon Morley, 1 
Edwards, Edward Clinton, l 
Eldridge, Harold Lockwood, 1 
Foster, Stuart Brooks, l 
Freeborn, Stanley Barron, 
Freedman, Samuel Leavitt, 
Frye, Carl Raymond, . 
Fuller, George, 
Griffin, William Gerald, 
Hadfield, Harold Frederick, 
Handy, Ralph Ellis, i . 
Harris, Rodney Wells, . 
Hazen, Edward Leonard, 1 
Hebard, Emory Blodgett, 1 
Heffron, Frederick, 
Hogg, Lawrence Jagger, * 
Howard, Louis Phillips, 
Hutchinson, John Gouverneur 
Ingham, Earl Morris, . 
Jacobs, Loring Humphrey, 1 
Jenney, Herbert Hedge, 1 
Johnson, Rollin Eugene, * 
Jones, Dettmar Wentworth, * 
Leete, Richard Fowler, 1 
Levine, Henry Walter, l 
Lincoln, Murray Danforth, 
Lucas, Hoyt Dennis, 
Major, Joseph, 
Marsh, Frank Eugene, . 
Merkle, Frederick Grover, 
Morrison, Harold Ivory, 
Morse, Harold John, 1 . 
Needham, Lester Ward, l 
Nicolet, Theodore Arthur, * 
Nicolet, Tell Wilham, . 
Nissen, Harry, 
Norton, Leslie Howard, 
Nute, Raymond Edson, 
Oertel, John Thomas, l . 
Parker, Ervine Franklin, 
Payne, Roland Alfred, . 
Pellett, John Doubleday, 
Peters, Chester Harry, 
Petersen, Peveril Oscar, * 
Porter, Bennett Allen, . 
Powers, Richard Henry, 1 
Read, Frederick William, » 
Reid, George Alexander, 
Russell, Alden Hesseltine, 
Sahr, Gabriel Arthur, 1 . 



North Cambridge, 

Fall River, . 

Fayetteville, N. Y 

Manchaug, . 

South Framingham 

Peabody, 

Southbury, Conn., 

Northfield, . 

Brookline, 

North Adams, 

Mattapoisett, 

Weymouth, . 

West Springfield, 

Salem, 

Wareham, 

West Somerville, 

Ware, . 

Roxbury, 

South Hadley Falls 

Deerfield, 

South Hadley Falls 

North Adams, 

Cataumet, 

Wethersfield, Conn 

Springfield, 

Fiskdale, 

Sherborn, 

Lawrence, 

North Easton, 

Arlington, 

Granby, 

Wellesley, 

South Boston 

Templeton, 

Melrose, 

Mount Kisco, N. 

Roxbury, 

North Raynham, 

West Springfield, 

Rutherford, N. J, 

Jefferson, 

Amherst, 

Melrose, 

Townsend, 

Springfield, 

Fall River, 

Fall River, 

Boston, 

Newport, R. I., 

Fall River, . 

South Hadley Falls : 

Poquonock, Conn., 

Wakefield, 

Worcester, 

Brown's Station, N 

Concord, 

Amherst, 

Maiden, 

Boston, 

Worcester, 

Watertown, 

Boston, 



21 Fearing Street. 

2 South College. 
79 Pleasant Street. 
Plant House. 

108 Pleasant Street. 

15 South College. 
77 Pleasant Street. 
79 Pleasant Street. 
7 Nutting Avenue. 

16 South College. 
Theta Chi House. 
116 Pleasant Street. 
13 South College. 
16 South College. 
88 Pleasant Street. 
Kappa Sigma House. 
116 Pleasant Street. 
101 Pleasant Street. 
116 Pleasant Street. 
86 Pleasant Street. 
South Hadley Falls. 
East Pleasant Street. 
10 North College. 

77 Pleasant Street. 
Care of E. H. Forristall. 

3 Fearing Street. 
108 Pleasant Street. 
Pease Avenue. 

19 Hallock Street. 

15 South College. 
86 Pleasant Street. 
25 Pleasant Street. 
6 Nutting Avenue. 
120 Pleasant Street. 
66 Pleasant Street. 
81 Pleasant Street. 
101 Pleasant Street. 
19 Hallock Street. 

1 Allen Street. 
58 Pleasant Street. 
79 Pleasant Street. 
North East Street. 
77 Pleasant Street. 
75 Pleasant Street. 
Kappa Sigma House. 
Flint Laboratory. 
C. S. C. House. 
85 Pleasant Street. 
79 Pleasant Street. 
9 Fearing Street. 
116 Pleasant Street. 
Kappa Sigma House. 
North Amherst. 

16 North College. 
116 Pleasant Street. 
9 Fearing Street. 
Hatch Barn. 
Veterinary Laboratory. 
Telephone, Amherst, 380. 
Care of E. M. Dickinson. 
116 Pleasant Street. 

15 Phillips Street. 



1 Work incomplete. 



132 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



[Jan. 



Sherman, Joel Powers, . 
Shirley, John Newton, . 
Small, Francis Willard, > 
Smith, Leon Edgar, 
Smith, Leone Ernest, 
Stevens, Arthur Eben. . 
Strange, Sarah Josephine, 
Tarbell, Munroe Gifford, i 
Taylor, Arthur Wright, 
Taylor, Leland Hart, 
Thurston, Arthur Searle, 
Tower, Alfred Leigh, 
Upton, Ernest Franklin, 
Walker, Nathaniel Kennard, 
Walker, Raymond Philip, 
Warner, Raymond Winslow, 
Webster, Louis Armstrong, 
Weigel, Arthur George, 
Wheeler, Chester Eaton, 
Whidden, Burton Clark, » 
Whippen, Charles Warren, 
Wing, John Govan, 1 
Wood, Henry Joseph, . 



Hyannis, 
South Duxbury, 
North Truro, 
Boston, 
Leominster, 
Brockton, 
Marshfield, 
Brim field, 
Feeding Hills, 
Peabody, 
Everett, 
Sheffield, 
Salem, 
Maiden, 
Taunton, 
Sunderland, 
Blackstone, 
Lawrence, 
Lowell, 
Townsend, 
Lynn, . 
Somerville, 
Mendon, 



9 South College. 

30 North Prospect Street. 
120 Pleasant Street. 

2 South College. 
116 Pleasant Street. 
Beta Kappa Phi House. 
Draper Hall. 

10 North College. 

3 Nutting Ave. 
13 South College. 
9 Fearing Street. 
120 Pleasant Street. 
Care of R. J. Watts. 
16 North College. 
83 Pleasant Street. 
77 Pleasant Street. 
82 Pleasant Street. 
Care of Captain Martin. 
87 Pleasant Street. 

81 Pleasant Street. 
13 Phillips Street. 
116 Pleasant Street. 

82 Pleasant Street. 



Alden, Charles Harold, l 
Allen, Francis Ellwood, 
Anderson, Herbert Henry, 
Archibald, Herbert Hildreth, 
Baird, Earle Fairbank, l 
Banister, Seth Warrener, 
Bartlett, Emory Haynes, l 
Bartlett, Edward Russell, 
Bartley, Hastings Newcomb, 
Bemis, Willard Gilbert, i 
Bennett, John Ingram, 
Bishop, Chester Allen, x 
Boyer, Edward Everett Hale 
Braley, Merton Loring, 
Bronson, Harold Julius, 
Brooks, Gardner Milton, 
Buell, Frank Weed, i . 
Buttrick, John Willard, 
Cale, Gladstone Hume, l 
Callard, John Case, > 
Cande, Donald Hopkins, 1 
Chase, Alexander Baxter, Jr., 
Churchill, Chester Albert, » 
Clark, Ellis Fred, 
Clark, Saxon Dickinson, 
Cleveland, Waldo Atwood, 
Clough, ! Maurice Joseph, 
Dalrymple, Andrew Campbell 
Damon, Leon Blanchard, 
Day, George Allen, 
Dole, Sumner Alvord, . 
Donnell, George Edwin, 
Doran, William Leonard, 
Draper, Earle Sumner, . 
Farrar, Stuart Kittridge, 
Fitzgerald, Daniel James, l 



Sophomoeb Class, 

Amherst, 

Melrose, 

Ware, . 

Waltham, 

Waltham, 

Westford, 

Enfield, 

Newburyport, 

Sandwich, 

North Brookfield, 

Boston, 

Peterboro, N. H., 

Lynn, . 

Rock, . 

Buckland, 

Newton, 

Brooklyn, N. Y., 

Melrose, 

West Springfield, 

Winthrop, 

Pittsfield, 

West Barnstable, 

Brockton, 

Granby, Conn., 

Springfield, . 

Baldwinsville, 

Needham, 

Revere, 

Melrose, 

Warren, 

Bardwell's Ferry, 

Burlington, . 

North Dartmouth, 

Milford, 

Springfield, . 

Worcester, . 



. East Pleasant Street. 

. 10 Allen Street. 

. 19 Pleasant Street. 

. Care of R. J. Watts. 

. 15 Beston Street. 

. 14 Nutting Avenue. 

. 12 Cottage Street. 

. 66 Pleasant Street. 

. 66 Pleasant Street. 

. 12 Cottage Street. 

. 66 Pleasant Street. 

. C. S. C. House. 

. 67 East Pleasant Street. 

. 52 Amity Street. 

. Brooks Farm. 

. 8 Allen Street. 

. 83 Pleasant Street. 

. 16 Nutting Avenue. 

. 79 Pleasant Street. 

. Care of President Butterfield. 

. 87 Pleasant Street. 

. Clark Hall. 

. 18 Nutting Avenue. 

. Theta Chi House. 

. 19 Phillips Street. 

. 14 Nutting Avenue. 

. 84 Pleasant Street. 

. 3 McClellan Street. 

. Nutting Avenue. 

. 12 Cottage Street. 

. 79 Pleasant Street. 

. East Experiment Station. 

. Plant House. 

. C. S. C. House. 

. Kappa Sigma House. 

. 75 Pleasant Street. 



i Work incomplete. 



1913.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 



133 



Flebut, Alpha John, 
Frost, Robert Theodore, 
Fuller, Richard, . 
Gare, Edward John, Jr., l 
Goodwin, Malcolm Noyes, 
Graham, Lucius Henry, 1 

Grant, Harold Davidson, 
Grebin, Mark Anthony, 1 
Griggs, Raymond Bradford, i 
Hall, George Morris, 
Hall, Roderick Chesley, 
Harper, James Edward, 
Harper, Raymond Wires, 
Harvey, Russell Wilton, 1 
Haskell, Willis Henry, Jr., l 
Hatfield, William Hollis, 
Hathaway, Isaac, l 
Hildreth, Paul Hughes, l 
Hill, Charles Chase, ' . 
Hotis, Ralph P., . 
Hyde, George Frederic, 
Hyde, Harold Gilmore, 
Johnson, Arthur, . 
Jordan, Perley Balch, 1 . 
Kelleher, Jerome Joseph. 
Kennedy, Thomas James, 
Kennedy, Worthington Chester, 
Koplovitz, Samuel, 
Lane, Merton Chesleigh, 
LeDuc, Ashley Cudworth, 1 
Lewis, Daniel James, 
Lewis, John Kirby, * 
Lincoln, Irving Boin, ' . 
Little, Harold Greenleaf , l 
Lovejoy, John Sumner, 
MacNeil, Ralph Langdel, 
Macy, Philip Arthur, . 
Marsh, Franklin Winter, 
Marsh, Herbert Verner, 
Masse, Sidney Merton, 
McKechnie, Ray Farrar, 
McLain, Ralph Emerson, 
Melican, George Deady, l 
Melloon, Ralph Reid, l . 
Moberg, Eldon Samuel, 
Montague, Enos James, 
Moore, Roger Henry, . 
Navas, Miguel, 1 . 
O'Brien, Daniel William, l 
Parker, Edwin Kenney, 1 
Parmenter, Ernest Brigham, 1 
Patten, Merrill Campbell, 
Patterson, Robert Earley, 
Pendleton, Harlow Libby, l 
Perry, Gerald Eugene, . 
Pike, Joseph Stevens, Jr., 
Potter, George Raymond, ' 
Price, James Albert, 
Rhoades, Paul Whitney, 
Rogers, Harold Merriman, 
Sauchelli, Vincent, 



Conn 



Amherst, 

New York, N. Y. 

Salem, . 

Northampton, 

Newburyport, 

Boston, 

Methuen, 

North Hadley, 

Chicopee Falls, 

Brookline, 

Worcester, 

New Haven, 

Barre, . 

Lanesville, 

Brooklyn, N 

Wellesley, 

Kingston, 

Newtonville, 

Melrose Highlands 

Evans Mills, N. Y 

North Dana, 

Winchendon, 

Bridgeport, Conn., 

Topsfield, . 

Montague City, 

South Hadley Falls 

Hardwick, 

Chelsea, 

South Duxbury, 

Chesterfield, 

Hanson, 

New Haven, Conn 

Glens Falls, N. Y., 

Newburyport, 

Newburyport, 

Chelsea, 

Oak Bluffs, 

Amherst, 

Deerfield, 

Dorchester, 

Natick, 

Melrose, 

Worcester, 

Lowell, 

Campello, 

Northampton 

Beverly, 

Barranquilla, 

Wayland, 

Northampton, 

Dover, 

Brighton, 

Dorchester, 

Dorchester, 

Amherst, 

Somerville, 

Ludlow, 

New York, N. Y., 

Maiden, 

Southington, Conn 

Waterbury, Conn., 



Col. 



S. A., 



27 McClellan Street. 

C. S. C. House. 

West Experiment Station. 

13 Phillips Street. 

Kappa Sigma House. 

Pleasant Street, care of Mrs. 

Clutia. 
3 McClellan Street. 
North Hadley. 
84 Pleasant Street. 
31 East Pleasant Street. 
79 Pleasant Street. 
Kappa Gamma Phi House. 
94 Pleasant Street. 
44 Pleasant Street. 
116 Pleasant Street. 
87 Pleasant Street. 
96 Pleasant Street. 
8 Allen Street. 
Pease Avenue. 

20 Amity Street. 
79 Pleasant Street. 

36 North Prospect Street. 

12 South College. 

15 Beston Street. 
75 Pleasant Street. 

35 East Pleasant Street. 
101 Pleasant Street. 
29 Lincoln Avenue. 
Care of L. A. Root. 
19 Pleasant Street. 
Kappa Sigma House. 
Care of E. M. Dickinson. 
Care of President Butterfield. 
Kappa Sigma House. 
53 Lincoln Avenue. 

21 Amity Street. 
53 Lincoln Avenue. 

16 Nutting Avenue. 
79 Pleasant Street. 
3 McClellan Street. 
5 McClellan Street. 
66 Pleasant Street. 
66 Pleasant Street. 
Kappa Sigma House. 
18 Nutting Avenue. 

13 Phillips Street. 
66 Pleasant Street. 
120 Pleasant Street. 
New Apiary. 

77 South Pleasant Street. 

79 Pleasant Street. 

31 East Pleasant Street. 

75 Pleasant Street. 

16 Nutting Avenue. 

Prospect House. 

3 Nutting Avenue. 

44 Pleasant Street. 

15 Beston Street. 

2 Allen Street. 

87 Pleasant Street. 

11 High Street. 



1 Work incomplete. 



134 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



[Jan. 



Scott, Lincoln Bain, 1 . 
Sears, William Richard, 
Severance, Verne Lincoln, 
Sherman, Milton Francis, 
Simon, Isaac Barney, l . 
Slein, Owen Francis, 
Smith, Himan, ' . 
Spofford, Chester Porter, 
Strauss, Abraham, l 
Taft, Richard Craig, i . 
Tarr, Lester Winslow, 1 
Tonry, Albert Joseph Paul, l 
Tower, Ralph Ernest, . 
Tower, William Reginald, 
Towne, Edwin Chester, x 
Upton, Raymond Melville, 
Vener, Benjamin, 
Vinal, Stuart Cunningham, 
Wellington, Benjamin, . 
White, Homer Beethoven, 
White, Henry Harrison, 
Whitmore, Philip Ferry, 
Whorf, Paul Francis, 
Wilkins, Alfred Emerson, 
Willey, Harold Cleland Clancy, 
Williams, Donald, 
Woodman, Edward, Jr., ** 
Wright, Elvin Stanley, . 



Melrose, 

Arlington, 

South Hanson, 

South Lincoln, 

Revere, 

New Braintree, 

Worcester, 

Georgetown, 

Boston, 

Oxford, 

Rockport, 

Winthrop, 

Becket, 

Sheffield, 

Waltham, 

Peabody, 

Brockton, 

East Weymouth, 

Waltham, 

Melrose, 

West Peabody, 

Sunderland, . 

Hyde Park, . 

Wakefield, . 

Orange, 

Catasauqua, Pa., 

Portland, Me., 

Worcester, . 



3 McClellan Street. 

84 Pleasant Street. 

Care of L. A. Root. 

10 Allen Street. 

38 Cottage Street. 

127 South Pleasant Street. 

8 Allen Street. 

5 McClellan Street. 
101 Pleasant Street. 
84 Pleasant Street. 
44 Pleasant Street. 
Durfee Plant House. 
120 Pleasant Street. 
94 Pleasant Street. 
C. S. C. House. 
87 Pleasant Street. 
38 Cottage Street. 

9 Allen Street. 

10 Allen Street. 
10 Allen Street. 

79 Pleasant Street. 
13 Phillips Street. 
87 Pleasant Street. 
116 Pleasant Street. 
Care of E. F. Gaskill. 
C. S. C. House. 
15 Gaylord Street. 
15 Fearing Street. 



Aiken, Harold, 
Allen, Chester King, 
Anderson, Frank Albert, l 
Andrews, Francis Marshall, Jr., 
Barnes, Fred Leslie, . . 
Bean, Harold John, x 
Beeler, Leon Charles, 1 . 
Bishop, Herbert Walker, 1 
Bisbee, Philip Emerson, 
Blanpied, Nelson Uhler, 
Bradley, William George, 
Brazil, William Henry, . 
Brush, David Carey, 
Burnham, Chester Arthur, 
Burt, Warner Howard, 
Caldon, John Jeremiah, 
Caldwell, Hat old Nute, 
Cardarelli, Emilio Joseph, 
Carruth, Glenn Howard, 
Carver, Frank Whitney, 
Cate, Rex March, 
Chamberlin, Raymond, 
Chisholm, Raymond Lincoln, 
Choate, Carlisle Edward, 
Clapp, Raymond Luckey, ' 
Clough, Charles Henry, 
Cobban, Donald Stickney, i 
Coleman, Albert Sumner, 
Coley, William Stanton, 
Courchene, Alcide Telesphor, 1 
Curran, Harry Ambrose, 



Freshman Class. 

Millis, . 

Quincy, 

Somerville, . 

Manchester, 

Plymouth, 

Haverhill, 

Adams, 

Doylestown, Pa., 

Waitsfield, Vt., 

Framingham, 

Groton, 

Leominster, . 

Vineyard Haven, 

Westford, 

Longmeadow, 

West Springfield, 

Lowell, 

Boston, 

Orange, 

Plymouth, 

Canton, 

Rutherford, N. J., 

Melrose Highlands 

Boston, 

Northfield, 

Dedham, 

Groveland, 

Mendon, 

Wilton, Conn., 

North Adams, 

Marlborough, 



29 McClellan Street. 
Brooks Farm. 

13 Phillips Street. 
53 Lincoln Avenue. 
7 Nutting Avenue. 
Care of E. F. Gaskill. 
75 Pleasant Street. 
C. S. C. House. 
East Pleasant Street. 
Care of Mr. Forristall. 
31 East Pleasant Street. 
116 Pleasant Street. 

19 Phillips Street. 
Brooks Farm. 

6 Nutting Avenue. 

3 Nutting Avenue. 

31 North Prospect Street. 

34 North Prospect Street. 

7 Nutting Avenue. 
3 Nutting Avenue. 
82 Pleasant Street. 
66 Pleasant Street. 
15 Phillips Street. 
Brooks Farm. 

35 East Pleasant Street. 
Mt. Pleasant. 

15 Hallock Street. 

36 North Prospect Street. 

14 Nash Block. 
Taylor Farm. 



* Work incomplete. 



1913. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 



135 



Curtin, Charles Warren, 
Cushing, Raymond Alonzo, 
Danforth, George Newlan, 
Davis, Frank Leslie, 
Dickinson, William Cowls, 
Dine, Hyman Bertram, 
Dinsmore, Donald Sanderson, 
Doggett, William Henry, l 
Doherty, Paul Edward, l 
DuffiU, Edward Stanley, i 
Dumas, Walter Branca, l 
Dunbar, Henry Hart, . 
Edwards, Maurice Millett, 
Eldredge, Raymond Chase, 
Eldridge, Clarence Crocker, 
Epstein, Harry Browdy, 
Fernald, Charles Henry, 
Fielding, Lester Edward, 
Fisher, George Basil, 
Fox, Edward Lawrence, l 
Francis, Charles Davis, 
Gaventa, Harry Reymer 
Gilmore, Benjamin Anthony, 
Gioiosa, Alfred Anthony, 
Glover, Theodore Whitford, 
Goodwin, Clinton Foster, 
Googins, Burton, 
Gordon, Lewis Sanford, Jr., 
Gould, Charles Holt, » . 
Graves, Ralph Wheeler, 
Gray, Frank Lyman, 
Gunn, Carlton Merrick, 
Hager, Clayton Marden, 
Hall, Stanley William, . 
Harlow, Nathaniel Luzerne, l 
Harriman, Chester Karl, 
Harris, William Lombard, Jr., 
Harrocks, Thomas Lincoln, 
Hart, Reginald, . 
Haskell, Frank Eugene, 
Hathaway, Charles Edward, 
Hemenway, Justin Stanley, 
Hendry, Arthur Ekman, l 
Hobart, Ralph Edmund, 
Holden, Mae Faustina, 
Hulsizer, Allan Lynne, . 
Hunt, Reginald Stuart, 
Huntington, Charles Albert, Jr., 
Jenna, William Wallace, 1 
Jerome, Frederick William, l 
Jones, Linus Hale, 
Kaplan, Barney, . 
Keegan, Frank Champion, 1 
Keegan, Thomas Michael, l 
Kelly, Harold Russell, . 
Kennedy, George William, 
Kilbon, Ralph Gillette, i 
King, Edward Lee, 
Kinsman, Alfred Oberlin, Jr. 
Kitsis, Henry Hyman, 1 
Knapton, Guy Lord, 
Laird, Kenneth Bradford, 



Auburndale, 

Somerville, . 

Foxcroft, Me., 

South Hopedale, 

North Amherst, 

Boston, 

Springfield, . 

Dedham, 

Fall River, . 

Greenwood, . 

Boston, 

Taunton, 

Lawrence, 

No. Abington, 

Natick, 

Amherst, 

Amherst, 

Maiden, 

Millbury, 

Winthrop, 

Cranford, N. J., 

Repaupo, N. J., 

Acushnet, 

Dorchester, . 

South Duxbury, 

Haverhill, 

Brooklyn, 

Clinton, 

Worcester, 

Shelburne Falls, 

Shelburne Falls, 

Sunderland, 

Somerville, 

Saxonville, 

Amherst, 

Exeter, N. H 

Deerfield, 

Westminster, 

Montague City, 

Northborough, 

Somerset, 

Williamsburg, 

Mattapan, . 

North Amherst, 

Royalston, . 

Flemington, N. J., 

Bridgewater, 

Poquonock, Conn. 

Athol, . 

Stockbridge, 

Milford, 

Maiden, 

Turners Falls 

Worcester, 

Haverhill, 

Sayville, L. I 

Springfield, 

Dorchester, 

Merrimac, 

Boston, 

Lawrence, 

Brockton, 



15 Hallock Street. 
13 Phillips Street. 

82 Pleasant Street. 
Care of E. F. Gaskill. 
North Amherst. 

35 South Pleasant Street. 

6 Nutting Avenue. 

35 East Pleasant Street. 
East Pleasant Street. 
Care of L. A. Root. 
35 East Pleasant Street. 

83 Pleasant Street. 
25 Pleasant Street. 

30 North Prospect Street. 
52 Lincoln Avenue. 
38 Cottage Street. 
44 Amity Street. 

2 Allen Street. 

Care of E. F. Gaskill. 
29 McClellan Street. 
25 Pleasant Street. 

35 East Pleasant Street. 
40 Amity Street. 
Brooks Farm. 

Care of L. A. Root. 

7 Nutting Avenue. 

52 Lincoln Avenue. 
Care of Dr. Gordon. 
66 Pleasant Street. 
40 Amity Street. 
North Amherst. 

3 Nutting Avenue. 
3 Nutting Avenue. 
Brooks Farm. 

7 Parsons Street. 

36 North Prospect Street. 

53 Lincoln Avenue. 

36 North Prospect Street. 
53 Lincoln Avenue. 
Care of C. R. Greene. 
19 Phillips Street. 
Brooks Farm. 

16 Nutting Avenue. 
North Amherst. 

Care of President Butterfield. 
29 North Prospect Street. 
53 Lincoln Avenue. 
82 Pleasant Street. 
116 Pleasant Street. 

40 Amity Street. 
Care of C. R. Greene. 
38 Cottage Street. 

75 Pleasant Street. 
75 Pleasant Street. 
15 Gaylord Street. 
7 Nutting Avenue. 
Brooks Farm. 
Brooks Farm. 

41 Pleasant Street. 
Pease Avenue. 

36 North Prospect Street. 



1 Work incomplete. 



136 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



[Jan. 



Lamoureux, Domina Joseph, 
Lehman, Walter Ernest, 
Lieber, Conrad Hugo, * 
Lindquist, Albert Evert, x 
Locke, Wilbur Trow, 
Lyford, Waldo Preston, 
MacDonald, Norman Duncan 
Mahony, William John, 
Mann, Victor Leslie, 
Marshall, Earl LeForest, 
Mattoon, Harold Gleason, 
Maynard, Harlan Slade, * 
McCulloeh, Norman Estes, 
Meade, Joseph Williams, 1 

Mimitz, Joseph Raymond, 1 
Montgomery-Peter, Thomas M. 
Mooney, Raymond A., l 
Morton, Walter Joseph, 1 
Moses, Charles Wicker, 
Moss, Earle Chester, ' . 
Mostrom, Harold Augustus, 
Murphy, John William, 
Nash, Clayton Wells, . 
Nestle, William John, l 
Nicholson, James Thomas, 
Noyes, Samuel Verne, 1 
O'Brion, Edwin Fulton, 
Oertel, August Leonard, i 
Palmer, George Bradford, 
Phelps, Sanford Wallace, 
Pierce, James Dwight, x 
Plaisted, Phihp Asbury, 
Porter, Philip Clayfield, 
Potash, Philip, i . ' . 
Potter, David, 
Pratt, Walter Howard, 



Prouty, Stanley Marshall, 
Quincy, Knight, . 
Randall, Denton William, 
Ray, George Burrill, 
Reed, Andrew John, Jr., 
Rendall, Raymond Eaton, 
Rich, Gilbert Warren, . 
Richards, Everett Stackpole, 
Richardson, Lewis Elmer, 
Ricker, Dean Albert, 
Rogers, Roland Winsor, s 
Rogers, Tyler Stewart, . 
Rowe, Louis Victor, x 
Russell, Ernest Samuel, 
Ryan, William Edward, Jr., J 
Sanderson, Everett Shovelton, 
Saunders, William Putnam, 
Sauter, William Hugo, l 
Scheufele, Frank Joseph, 
Schlotterbeck, Lewis, 1 . 
Schwartz, Louis, 
Shapiro, Frank Simon, . 
Sherinyan, Suran Donald, 



Adams, 

Worcester, 

Jamaica Plain, 

Jamaica Plain, 

Lawrence, 

Natick, 

Melrose, 

Winthrop, 

Millers Falls, 

Neponset, 

Pittsfield, 

Jefferson, 

Pawtucket, R. I., 

West Springfield, 

Hadley, 

Philadelphia, Pa., 

Pittsburgh, N. Y 

Jamaica Plain, 

Ticonderoga, N. Y 

Worcester, . 

Somerset, 

Beverly, 

South Weymouth, 

Amherst, 

Leominster, . 

Georgetown, 

Somerville, . 

South Hadley Falls 

Brookline, 

Turners Falls, 

Springfield, . 

Arlington, 

West Springfield, 

Boston, 

Concord, 

Dalton, 

North Brookfield, 

Roslindale, . 

Somerville, . 

Hingham, 

Dalton, 

Melrose, 

Hingham, 

Northampton, 

Millis. . 

Worcester, 

Roxbury, 

Saxonville, . 

Melrose, 

Hadley, 

Stoughton, . 

Centreville, R. I., 

Lawrence, 

Turners Falls, 

South Natick, 

Roxbury Station, Conn. 

Melrose, 

Lynn, . 

Worcester, . 



75 Pleasant Street. 

East Pleasant Street. 

31 North Prospect Street. 

5 McClellan Street. 

25 Pleasant Street. 

52 Lincoln Avenue. 

College Store. 

29 McClellan Street. 

13 Phillips Street. 

Hadley. 

87 Pleasant Street. 

Care of R. J. Goldberg. 

Care of Professor Morton. 

Care of Mrs. Hill, Nutting 

Avenue. 
Hadley. 

15 Phillips Street. 
12 Hallock Street. 
Care of Mrs. Gibbs. 
7 Nutting Avenue. 
Care of Mrs. Gibbs. 
36 North Prospect Street. 
15 Beston Street. 
7 Nutting Avenue. 
Amherst. 

116 Pleasant Street. 
36 North Prospect Street. 
83 Pleasant Street. 
South Hadley Falls. 
Care of E. F. Gaskill. 
35 East Pleasant Street. 
Care of E. H. Forristall. 
77 Pleasant Street. 
79 Pleasant Street. 
35 South Pleasant Street. 
40 Amity Street. 
Hallock Street and Pease 

Avenue. 
12 Cottage Street. 
35 East Pleasant Street. 

Brooks Farm. 
Pease Avenue. 
College Store. 
8 Allen Street. 
Northampton. 
29 McClellan Street. 
C. S. C. House. 
25 Lincoln Avenue. 
Care of Mr. Forristall. 
IS Nutting Avenue. 
Hadley. 

7 Nutting Avenue. 
19 Phillips Street. 
1 Allen Street. 
75 Pleasant Street. 
52 Lincoln Avenue. 
12 Hallock Street. 
38 Cottage Street. 
41 Pleasant Street. 
Care of Mrs. Taylor, North 
Amherst. 



1 Work incomplete. 



1913. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 



137 



Simmons, Perez, J 
Smith, Horace Arthur, 1 
Smith, Philip Laurence, 
Stanford, Ernest Elwood, 
Stearns, Frederick Campbell, 
Stone, Albert Edwin, ' . 
Stoughton, Richard, 
Swan, Durelle, 
Swift, Raymond Walter, 
Taber, Ralph Fred, 
Tarbell, Herbert Hitchcock, x 
Taylor, Howell, i . 
Topham, Alfred, . 
Treat, Rutherford Sperry, 
Upham, Thomas Carlton, 
Verbeck, Howard Graves, 1 
"Walkden, Herbert Haldon, 
Walker, Henry Marshall, 
Walker, Robert Russell, 
Warner, Lewis Pomeroy, l 
Webster, Frank Cedric. 
Weisbein, Isaac, . 
Wells, Harry Andrew, . 
Wentworth, Everett Lawrence 
Wetherbee, Raymond Scott, 
Wheeler, Chester Warren, 
Wheeler, Robert Kellogg, 
Whitney, Leon Fradley, 
Whitney, Harold Tichenor, 
Wies, Calmy, * 
Wilcox, Timothy Palmer, 
Wildon, Carrick Earl, . 



Pittsfield, 
Newtown, Conn., 
Kingston, 
Rowe, . 
Waltham, 
Worcester, 
Montague, 
Dorchester Centre, 
North Amherst, 
Phoenix Mills, N. 
Warren, 
Florida, N. Y., 
Lawrence, 
Seymour, Conn., 
Fitchburg, 
Maiden, 
Westford, 
South Harwich, 
Mansfield, 
Sunderland, . 
Harvard, 
Brooklyn, N. Y., 
Dalton, Pa., 
East Dover, Vt., 
Waltham, 
Southborough, 
Great Barrington, 
Brooklyn, N. Y., 
Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 
Maiden, 
Andover, 
Melrose, 



36 North Prospect Street. 

Care of Mrs. Gibbs. 

Care of Mrs. Gibbs. 

71 South Pleasant Street. 

40 Amity Street. 

Brooks Farm. 

21 Fearing Street. 

Care of Professor Morton. 

North Amherst. 

77 Pleasant Street. 

12 Cottage Street. 

7 Nutting Avenue. 

31 East Pleasant Street. 

7 Nutting Avenue. 

15 Hallock Street. 

Care of C. R. Greene. 

Brooks Farm. 

Brooks Farm. 

3 Nutting Avenue. 

35 East. Pleasant Street. 

Care of L. A. Root. 

5 McClellan Street. 

30 North Prospect Street. 

35 East Pleasant Street. 

28 Northampton Road. 

40 Amity Street. 

52 Lincoln Avenue. 

C. S. C. House. 

38 Cottage Street. 

83 Pleasant Street. 

66 Pleasant Street. 



Bates, L. Emeline, 
Blackhall, Allan John, . 
Cann, Fred Hodges, 
Cannon, Thomas Vincent, 
Chambers, Maude Burdick, 
Comeau, Mark Walter, 
Crosby, Stanley, . 
Dearth, Newman, 
Dillon, Thomas Stevenson, 
Dodd, Dexter Tiffany, . 
Dodge, Walter Eugene, 
Fiske, Howard Benjamin. 
Fitzgerald, William Patrick, 
Fox, Everett Bailey, 
Hicks, Albert James, 
Hooper, Edward Asa, . 
Kendall, Edward Dana, 
Lockwood, Dimon, 
Malkasian, Nishan P., . 
MacCormac, Wm. Frederic, 
Mott, Percival, 
Nixon, William Joseph, 
Pease, Willard Noah Morris, 
Perry, Edgar Adams, . 
Prouty, LeRoy Fletcher, 
Rae, George Little, 
Richards, Edwin Henry, 



Unclassified Students. 

. Billerica, 

, Brookline, 

. Beverly, 

. Newton, 

. Harper's Ferry, W. Va. 

. Maynard, 

. Warren, 

. Ashland, 

. West Warren, 

. Chestnut Hill, 

. Geneva, O., . 

. Passaic, N. J., 

. Worcester, . 

. Dracut, 

. Northfield, . 

. Chestnut Hill, 

Holden, 

. Boston, 

. Boston, 

. Maiden, 

. Cambridge, . 

. Boston, 

. Altoona, Pa., 

. Attleborough, 

, Rockland, 

. Needham Heights, 

. Hartford, Conn., 



Draper Hall. 

Care of Professor Morton. 

44 Triangle Street. 

77 Pleasant Street. 

8 Allen Street. 

19 Pleasant Street. 

Theta Delta Chi House. 

35 East Pleasant Street. 
101 Pleasant Street. 

83 Pleasant Street. 
14 South College. 
Care of Professor White. 
75 Pleasant Street. 
3 Nutting Avenue. 
Brooks Farm. 

36 North Prospect Street. 
Brooks Farm. 
Prospect House. 

Brooks Farm. 

81 Pleasant Street. 

101 Pleasant Street. 

Brooks Farm. 

35 East Pleasant Street. 

31 North Prospect Street. 

2 Allen Street. 

2 Allen Street. 



i Work incomplete. 



138 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



[Jan. 



Ridlon, Ernest Tarr, 
Taylor, Frank Reed, 
Willard, Harold Nelson, 
Winkler, Alfred, . 



Chelsea, 
Frye, Me., . 
Baltimore, Md., . 
Hackensack, N. J., 



15 Gaylord Street. 

30 North Prospect Street. 

81 Pleasant Street. 

44 Triangle Street. 



Short Courses. 
Ten Weeks' Registration. 



Abbot, Mary Perkins, 
Allen, Walter J., 
Badger, Jos. J., 
Baker, Chas. L., 
Baldwin, Chas. H., 
Barker, Bowen, 
Barnard, Ernest K., 
Bartlett, Allen J., 
Bates, Harold, . 
Bigelow, Jos. S., Jr.; 
Bittinger, Fritz John, 
Blodgett, W. K., 
Borden, Aulrey W., 
Boyd, Gardner, 
Bresth, Samuel, 
Brewer, Leon Arthur, 
Browne, W. Prichard, 
Caldwell, Delmont, 
Campbell, Ronald, 
Cartier, Frank J., 
Chapman, Mortimer, 
Chase, Chas. S., 
Clary, Dennis J., 
Coffin, Paul S., 
Colburn, Edw., 
Cole, Harold W., 
Condon, E. F., 
Cooley, Elbert, 
Cooper, Herbert M., 
Cotton, Harvey, 
Crowley, Jos., 
Cushman, Julian H., 
Dale, Fred, 
Davis, H. W., . 
Davis, Walter H., 
Davison, Geo. E., 
Deady, Nona E., 
Decatur, Jos. H., 
Easterbrook, I. H., 
Eastman, Harold, 
Farrar, A. D., . 
Feeney, John, Jr., 
Fiebiger, Peter, 
Fisher, Walter H., 
Fisher, E. J., . 
Ford, Earl Jay, 
Francis, Benj. A., 
Freeman, Jos. O.. 
French, Mrs. Mary B 
Gleason, Ray E., 
Gopan, Sylvester, 
Greene, Maurice N., 
Grofi, Julya, 
Grosvenor, Wm. H., 
Gummow, Earl, 
Hakes, Chauncey, 



5 Marlboro Street, Boston. 

Box 76, Berlin. 

Hudson. 

8 St. James Street, Boston. 

75 Pearl Street, Boston. 

85 Forest Hills Street, Jamaica Plain. 

Grasmere, N. H., 

Lenox. 

Oxford. 

Cohasset. 

Plymouth. 

South Lincoln. 

South Framingham. 

Dedham. 

West Acton. 

Berlin. 

New York City. 

Dorchester. 

Way land. 

Mittineague. 

Richmond. 

Foxborough. 

Holyoke. 

Boston. 

New Boston, N. H. 

Greenbush. 

Great Barrington. 

New York. 

Interlaken. 

Brighton. 

Cushman. 

Bernardston. 

Manchester. 

Greenfield. 

Amherst. 

Maiden. 

South Boston. 

Wayland. 

Dudley. 

South Lyndeboro, N. H. 

Amherst. 

Westford. 

Weehawken, N. J. 

Barre. 

Falmouth. 

Stockbridge. 

Rock. 

Dana. 

Acworth, N. H. 

Dell. 

Tarrytown, N. Y. 

Amherst. 

Amherst. 

Auburn. 

Halifax. 

Stockbridge. 



1913.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 139 

Hall, C. John Milton. 

Harris, Myron A., ..... . Farmington, Conn. 

Hawks, Paul, ....... . Deerfield. 

Hendrickson, M. Louise Pittsfield. 

Holbrook, Lewis, ...... . Brooks' Farm, Amherst. 

Howes, Leon G., ...... . "Watson. 

Ihmsen, Chas. B., ..... . Providence, R. I. 

Imlay, Manning P., . . . . . . . Zanesville, O. 

Jenks, E. Lawrence, ....... Adams. 

Johnson, Raymond F., . . . . . . North Grafton. 

Jordan, Earl W., ...... . West Newbury. 

Jones, Chapin, ....... . Tufts College. 

Judd, Robt. S., South Hadley. 

Kendall, E. Dana Holden. 

Kentfield, John T., ...... . Amherst. 

Lathe, Martha L., Newton. 

Lawrence, Wm. G., ...... . Lincoln Street, Hudson. 

Leach, C. Arthur, ....... South Hamilton. 

Leithauser, G. C, . . . . . . . Bloomfield, N. J. 

Lerner, Rose, ....... . Peru. 

Lillie, Walter P. Peace Dale, R. I. 

Macken, Michael, Glendale. 

Manton, Geo., Jr., Eglinton, Ont. 

Martell, J03. A Southbridge. 

McGill, Edg. J., Beverly. 

McGregor, Frank, . . . . . . . Newburyport. 

Mead, Harlow E., . . . . . . . North Andover. 

Melloon, Ralph Reid, . ' . . . . . Lowell. 

Messerli, R. A., . . . . . . . "West Andover. 

Mezit, Peter, ....... . Damascus, Va. 

Moyle, John, Jr., Groton. 

Nash, Henry C, Amherst. 

Newton, Lola J., ..... . West Brattleboro, Vt. 

Newton, R. Alb., West Brattleboro, Vt. 

North, John, . . . . . . . Richmond. 

O'Connor, Raymond L., ..... . Jamaica Plain. 

Paley, Israel, ....... . Colchester, Conn. 

Palmer, Florence E., . . .' . . . . Chestnut Hill. 

Parker, Priscilla, 100 Blue Hills, Hartford, Conn. 

Paulson, Jos. W., ...... . Meadowwood Farms, Cazenovia, 

N. Y. 

Pearson, Edw., ....... . Fairhaven. 

Pease, Clarence A., ...... . Meriden, Conn. 

Poor, Benj. P., . . . . . . . North Andover. 

Prentice, Mrs. I. S., . . . . . . . Springfield. 

Prentice, I. S., . . ... . . . . Springfield. 

Prescott, E. Clyde, Westford. 

Putnam, Earl F., ..... . Easthampton. 

Priest, Karlton K., ...... . Littleton. 

Reed, Frank H., . . . . . . . Greenwich, Conn. 

Rosen, Morris, ....... . Brockton. 

Sabine, Stephen W., ...... . Brookline. 

Sanford, Earle, ...... . Springfield. 

Simmons, Geo. Slate, ..... . Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Simmons, G. W., ...... . Amherst. 

Shaylor, F. W., Lee. 

Smith, E. Parker Holliston. 

Smith, John A., . . . . . . . South Westport. 

Snow, Linus A., . . . . . . . Windsor, Conn. 

Snow, Inez J., . . . . . . . . Windsor, Conn. 

Story, Myron, ....... . Chester. 

Talbot, H. S South Hadley. 

Tate, Raymond C, ...... . Monterey. 

Tufts, Wm Boston. 



140 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [Jan. 

Turner, Harvey, . . . . . . . North Reading. 

Walker, Raymond, ...... . Greenwich Village. 

Wall, Geo. W., Chester, Pa. 

Warburton, Chatterton, Jr., .... . Fall River. 

Webber, Harold T., ...... . Winchester. 

Wetmore, C. Inglis, ...... Wollaston. 

Wheeler, Caleb H., ...... . Concord. 

Whitby, Lawrence, ...... . Northborough. 

Wilson, Wm. F., Orford, N. H. 

Wiswall, Geo. W., ...... . Newton Centre. 

Wiswall, Ralph A., ....... Newton Centre. 

Worthen, Stewart, ...... . Mittineague. 

Apple Packing School. 

Abbot, M. P., Boston. 

Bigelow, Jos. S., Jr., ...... . Cohasset. 

Boyd, Gardner, ...... . Dedham. 

Brown, F. Howard, ...... . Marlborough. 

Browne, W. P., New York City. 

Clark, Winslow, ...... . Shoreham, Vt. 

Cobb, Geo. R., ....... Kingston, R. I. 

Colburn, Edw. N. New Boston, N. H. 

Cole, Harold W., ...... . Greenbush. 

Condon, C. F., ...... . Great Barrington. 

Critchett, E. R., ...... . Amherst. 

Crocker, B., ...... . . Morristown, N. J. 

Davenport, S. L., . . . . . . North Grafton. 

Dickson, Walter A., ...... . Harvard. 

Easterbrook, I. H. t ...... . Dudley. 

Granger, Helen, ...... . Griswoldville. 

Green, C. R., . . . . . . . . Belchertown. 

Kendall, E. D Holden. 

Leach, C. Arthur, ...... . South Hamilton. 

Lord, W. E., Newfield, Me. 

McGill, Edg. J Beverly. 

Mead, H. E., . . . . . . . . North Andover. 

Messerli, R. A., ...... . West Andover. 

Munson, Wm. A., . . . . . . Littleton. 

Paul, R. A., . . . . . . . Framingham. 

Paulson, J. W., ...... . Cazenovia, N. Y. 

Prentice, I. S., . . . . . . . . Springfield. 

Putnam, E. F., ....... Easthampton. 

Reynolds, L. J., . . . . . . . Greenwich, Conn. 

Rogers, Geo. L., ..... . North Wilbraham. 

Sabin, Leroy C, ..... . . Ipswich. 

Sabine, S. W., ....... . Brookline. 

Shattuck, Mrs. B. B., West Acton, Mass. 

Taylor, E. R., Stow, Mass. 

Tufts, Wm., Boston. 

Walker, R. C, . . . . . . . . Greenwich, Conn. 

Wallace, Wm. N., ...... . Amherst. 

Webber, H. T., Winchester. 

Wheeler, C. N., ...... . Concord. 

Whitby, L. H., Northborough. 

Beekeeping Course. 



Belleville, W. E 


. South Chelmsford 


Churchill, Clarence, . 


. Lynn. 


Dayton, Louise M., . 


. Boston. 


Hartwell, Harriet, 


. Boston. 


Howland, Florence B., 


. Revere. 


Lockwood, D., .... 


. Amherst. 



1913.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 141 

Robie, H. W Winona, N. H. 

Williams, Mrs. Ada B., . . . . . . Nahant. 

Wojcik, Rev. James, ...... Springfield, N. Y. 

Wood, Lawrence, ....... Amherst. 

Poultry Course. 

Abbott, George H., ....... Brookline. 

Adams, Rev. W. H.,''. ...... Southampton. 

Allis, Mrs. R. D Amherst. 

Allis, Rufus D., ....... Amherst. 

Barker, Arthur C, ....... Boston. 

Barnes, Mrs. Ralph, ....... Andover. 

Bosworth, W. D., ....... North Orange. 

Brewer, Mrs. A. A., . . . . . . . Southampton. 

Brigham, Henry, ....... Northampton. 

Brooks, A. A., . . . . . . . . Holyoke. 

Brown, Geo. A., . . . . . . . Amherst. 

Browne, L. L., . . . . . . . . New York, N. Y. 

Burnett, W. A., South Hadley. 

Byam, Mrs. D. H Mansfield. 

Challis, H. E South Hadley. 

Childs, Emily F .. . Manomet. 

Childs, P. B., ........ Manomet. 

Churchill, Mrs. Wm. W., Milton. 

Clark, H. H., . Billerica. 

Clark, Norman, ....... Sunderland. 

Corliss, Oscar L., . . . . . . . Belchertown. 

Cressey, George B., . . . . . . . Salem. 

Davis, Mrs. E. H., ....... Amherst. 

Doggett, Mary C, . . . . . . Dedham. 

Doggett, T. T Dedham. 

Eldidge, Mrs. A., Amherst. 

Estabrook, O. B., . . ... . . . Hopedale. 

Flagg, Helen L., West Acton. 

Forristall, Mrs. E. H., Amherst. 

Garabed, Mrs. D., . . . . . _ . . Worcester. 

Gold, M. D., Amherst. 

Goodnow, J. S., . . . . . . . Amherst. 

Griswold, A. W., Elmwood, N. H. 

Griswold, W. P Holyoke. 

Gunn, Chas. I., ....... Sunderland. 

Gunn, L. M Sunderland. 

Hack, Rev. Rollin T., . . . . . . Housatonie. 

Harrison, Mrs. Walter H., ..... Lebanon Springs, N. Y. 

Harrison, Walter H., . . . . . . Lebanon Springs, N. Y. 

Haven, Alta M Mansfield. 

Hawthorn, Peter, ....... Amherst. 

Herrick, Ralph C Hollis, N. H. 

Hitchcock, Mary M., Ware. 

Hodder, Mrs. A. R Hadley. 

Hooper, Mrs. W. H., East Milton. 

Hyde, Elizabeth, Ware. 

Jacobs, D. I Wellesley. 

Jones, E. A New Canaan, Conn. 

Knowles, Rev. Samuel, ...... Lexington. 

Lewis, I. C, . Ulysses, Pa. 

Lyon, Clarence W., South Weymouth. 

Mayerison, T. Sydney, Lawrence. 

Messier, A. E., Amherst. 

Miller, H. B., South Hadley. 

Miskell, T. L. Brookline. 

Moody, F. W. Rutland. 

Morgan, Susie P., Amherst. 



142 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



[Jan. 



Morse, John E., ....... Hadley. 

Neil, James J., . . . . . . . Lawrence. 

Northan, H. H Westfield. 

Parsons, W. E., . . . . . . . New Hartford, Conn. 

Pease, Mrs. E. E., Granby. 

Pease, E. E., . Granby. 

Perkins, Maude, ....... Newburyport. 

Rice, W. A South Hadley Falls. 

Richardson, Harriet, . . . . . . South Hadley. 

Rood, Frank W., ....... Southampton. 

Shaw, Win. E., ....... Belchertown. 

Smith, Louis E., ....... Salem. 

Stuart, H. W., ........ Amherst. 

Sturgis, Mrs. Edward, ...... Andover. 

Talbot, H. S South Hadley. 

Thayer, Mrs. C. H., Amherst. 

Thayer, H. A., Holyoke. 

Speight, Thomas, ....... East Longmeadow. 

Torrey, E. D., ........ Easthampton. 

Warner, Merrill, ....... Sunderland. 

Warner, Robt. G., . . . . . . . Florence. 

White, Mrs. E. S. Roxbury. 

Wolcott, Oliver, ....... East Longmeadow. 



Summary by Classes. 



Graduate students, 
Senior class, 
Junior class, 
Sophomore class, 
Freshman class, . 
Unclassified students, 



21 

93 
102 
125 
184 

31 



Total registration, ...... 

Geographical Summary. 
Massachusetts, ........ 

New York, ........ 

Connecticut, ........ 

New Jersey, ........ 

Pennsylvania, ........ 

New Hampshire, ....... 

Vermont, ......... 

Maine, ......... 

Rhode Island, ........ 

Barbados, ......... 

Colombia, S. A., 

Iowa, ......... 

Kentucky, ........ 

Maryland, ........ 

Mexico, ......... 

Ohio 

Virginia, ......... 

West Virginia, ........ 

Total 



556 



473 
26 
20 
9 
5 
4 
4 
3 
3 



556 



1913. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 



143 



Graduate Students — Candidates for a Degree. 
Ackerman, Arthur John, ........ Worcester. 

B.Sc, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1912. 
Anderson, David Wadsworth, ....... Manchester, N. H. 

B.Sc, New Hampshire State College, 1910. 
Bourne, Arthur Isreal, . . . . . . . . Kensington, N. H. 

A.B., Dartmouth College, 1907. 
Davis, Irving Wilder, ........ Lowell. 

B.Sc, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1911. 
Fowler, George Scott, ........ Wayland. 

B.Sc, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1912. 
Gates, Rupert Granville, ........ Northampton. 

Ph.B., Sheffield Scientific School, 1912. 
Gilbert, George Henry, . . . . . . . . Boylston. 

Ph.B., Boston University, 1901. 
Hall, Russell Bertram, ........ Worcester. 

B.Sc, Amherst College, 1912. 
Hutson, John Coghlan, ........ Bridgetown^ Barbados. 

B.A., Oxford University, 1909. 
Martin, James Francis, ........ Amherst. 

B.Sc, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1912. 
Morse, Henry Bowditch, ........ Salem. 

B.Sc, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1911. 
Noyes, Harry Alfred, ........ Marlborough. 

B.Sc, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1912. 
Parker, Ralph Robinson, ........ Maiden. 

B.Sc, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1912. 
Ruprecht, Rudolf William, ....... Brooklyn, N. Y. 

B.Sc, Rhode Island State College, 1911. 
Richardson, Francis Allen, ....... Boston. 

S.B., Harvard University, 1896. 
Smulyan, Marcus Thomas, ....... Amherst. 

B.Sc, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1909. 
Thomas, Frank Lincoln, ........ Athol. 

B.Sc, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1910. 
Tower, Daniel Gordon, ........ Roxbury. 

B.Sc, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1912. 
Turner, Howard Archibald, ....... Dorchester. 

B.Sc, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1912. 
Watkins, John Bedford, ......... Midlouthian, Va. 

B.Sc, Virginia Polytechnic, 1911. 
Wehle, Harry Brandeis, ........ Louisville, Ky. 

A.B., Harvard University, 1910. 



Graduate Students — Not Candidates for a Degree. 
Eaton, Marion Goodwin, ........ Sudbury. 

A.B., Radcliffe College, 1910. 
Rand, Frank Prentice, ........ Worcester. 

A.B., Williams College, 1912. 



Summer School Registration, 1911. 



Aldrich, Helen, 
Allen, Mrs. Jas. A., . 
Allis, Mrs., 
Baker, Oliver A., 
Barry, Mary, . 
Bartlett, Mrs. Eugene, 
Bartlett, Rev. Eugene, 
Beaumont, Louise M., 
Belcher, S. Elizabeth, 



Dorchester. 

Holyoke. 

Amherst. 

Kingston. 

Amherst. 

Chicago, 111. 

Chicago, 111. 

Worcester. 

Worcester. 



144 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [Jan. 

Bennett, Alfred C New York City. 

Blanchard, Lucile M., ..... North Uxbridge. 

Bonsfield, Mary, . . . . • . . North Adams. 

Boyd, Gardner, ...... Dedham. 

Bradlee, Thomas, ...... Northampton. 

Burke, E. G Holyoke. 

Burnham, Jessie E., . . . . . . Waltham. 

Butcher, Gertrude, ...... Roxbury. 

Carosella, Alfredo, ....... University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. 

Car, Helen F., . . . . . . . Boston. 

Case, Myra W., ...... West Hartford, Conn. 

Chalmers, Helen, ...... New York. 

Chalmers, Mary, . . . . . . New York. 

Cheney, Hazel Chase, ..... Amherst. 

Chow, T. K Amherst. 

Church, Florence A., New York .City. 

Clark, Anna M New York City. 

Cleaveland, M. N East Boxford. 

Cole, Wm. Morton, ...... Newton Highlands. 

Colin, Miss M. Von, • . Columbus, O. 

Cushman, Mrs. F. P., . . . . . Springfield. 

Cushman, F. P., . . . . . . Springfield. 

Dame, Daisy G„ West Medford. 

Dame, Mrs. Lorin L., West Medford. 

Dibble, Mrs. Gertrude New York City. 

Dimick, Julian A., ..... East Corinth, Vt. 

Doherty, Daniel F., . . . . . . Dorchester. 

Eldidge, Mrs. Lizzie, ' Amherst. 

Epstein, Frances Amherst. 

Epstein, Ida A., Amherst. 

Evans, Augusta D., ...... Northampton. 

Farley, Chas. Judd Wellesley Hills. 

Farnsworth, Earl H., Norwood. 

Fisher, Georgina O., . . . . . . Cambridge. 

Foley, Daniel, ....... Brighton. 

Foster, Mr. C. W Leominster. 

Fox, Sarah E Cohasset. 

Gere, Robt. W Springfield. 

Gerould, Mrs. C. W., Cambridge. 

Gerould, Chas. W , Cambridge. 

Goodnow, Edna, ....... Amherst. 

Gregory, E. S., . . . . . . Somerville. 

Groff, J. G . . • Amherst. 

Hall, E. Josephine, Waltham. 

Hea, Emily N., ...... Medford. 

Heidenheim, Hannah, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Hewins, Alice E., Dedham. 

Hidden, Mrs. W. H., Cambridge. 

Hidden, W. H., Jr., Cambridge. 

Holloway, Rev. Wm. H Thomasville, Ga. 

Howard, Mildred, North Amherst. 

Hoyt, Mrs. Laura A Greenfield. 

Hurd, Mrs. Wm., Amherst. 

Johnson, Bertha L., Bristol, Conn. 

Kellogg, Ella North Amherst. 

Kennedy, H. A East Weymouth. 

Levin, Ethel, Amherst. 

Liang, F. T Amherst. 

Liang, Yii Cho, Amherst. 

Lew, Gerard N Amherst. 

Lovell, MaryE . . • Wayland. 

Lyman, Harriet E Boston. 

Macdonald, Chas. D., New York City. 



1913. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 



145 



McKeen, Mrs. Teresa F., 
Macomber, Lucy S., 
Malbney, Margaret, 
Manoukian, V. M., 
March, Mrs. Clement 
Matthews, Enid, 
Mills, Mabelle, . 
Mumma, C. H., 
Nickerson, Charlotte 
Ostrolenk, Theresa, 
Pabodie, Mrs., . 
Pabodie, Wm., . 
Perry, Sylvia, . 
Peters, Thomas H., 
Petersen, Anna K., 
Petersen, Ella O., 
Petersen, Lilian O., 
Phelps, Annie L., 
Potter, Sara E., 
Putnam, Chas. S., 
Quint, Harry, . 
Richards, J. L., 
Roberts, Fanny E., 
Roberts, Jessie, 
Robinson, Mrs. A. M 
Robinson, Dr. M. B. (Miss) 
Roys, Mabelle F. (Mrs.), 
Roys, Rev. Edville A, 
Seaverns, Annie W., 
Shaw, Rev. Arthur W., 
Sherman, Frank M., Jr., 
Sherman, Sara L., 
Sherrard, Evelyn B., 
Shumway, Ruth, 
Simmons, Alva N., 
Sloane, Laura, . 
Smith, John F., 
Souther, Marguerite, 
Strickland, Elinor, 
Stutson, Miss P. B., 
Sun, Y. Philander, 
Sussman, Rudolf, 
Story, Mrs. G. E., 
Tobin, Ellen C, 
Tucker, Arabella H., 
Vining, Roscoe H., 
White, Mrs. Ellen S., 
Whitman, Adelaide, 
Whitney, Jos. T., 
WilUams, Guy F., 
Wiswell, Ralph A., 



Allston. 

North Westport. 

Amherst. 

Boston. 

Arlington. 

Cambridge. 

Amherst. 

Holyoke. 

Amherst. 

Amherst. 

Hartwell, O. 

Hartwell, O. 

Amherst. 

North Truro. 

Everett. 

Everett. 

Everett. 

Boston. 

Roxbury. 

Walpole, N. H. 

Roxbury. 

Brookline. 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Kingston, N. Y. 

South Boston. 

Waltham. 

Boxford. 

Boxford. 

Jamaica Plain. 

Goffstown, N. H. 

West Newton. 

Weston. 

West Waltham. 

Amherst. 

Roslindale. 

Amherst. 

Berea, Ky. 

Jamaica Plain. 

Amherst. 

Columbus, O. 

Worcester. 

Sharon. 

Amherst. 

Lawrence. 

Worcester. 

Ipswich. 

Grove Hall. 

Amherst. 

Medford. 

North Anson, Me. 

Newton Center. 



Index. 



PAGE 

Admission ...... 23 

Advanced standing .... 35 

Agricultural education ... 76 
Agricultural Economics. (See Eco- 
nomics.) 

Agriculture 45 

Agronomy 45 

Alumni associations, class secretaries, 

etc 122 

Animal husbandry .... 46 

Attendance, summary of . . 154 
Awards. (See Honors.) 



Bacteriology. (See Veterinary Science 

and Microbiology.) 
Botany 



55,88 



Certificates. (See Admission.) 

Chemistry 57, 88 

Civil engineering. (See Mathematics . ) 

Clubs, etc. (See Organizations.) 

College officers. (See Faculty.) 

Committees of faculty ... 18 

Corporation 10 

Courses of instruction: 

Undergraduate 37-82 

Graduate . . . . - . . 85-90 

Dairying . . . . . . 47 

Degrees conferred .... 124 

Drawing 54 

Economics 67, 75 

English 69 

Entomology 61, 89 

Entrance. (See Admission.) 

Equipment of departments . . 113 
Examinations, entrance. (See Ad- 
mission. ) 

Expenses 107 

Experiment station . . . 9, 15 

Extension work 15, 91 

Faculty and faculty committees . 12, 18 

Farm administration .... 48 

Fees 108 

Floriculture 50 

Forestry 51 

French 73 



General departments . 
General information . 
Geology. (See Zoology.) 
German .... 
Government. (See History.) 
Graduate school . 



104 



83 



PAGE 

History 68 

Honors 121 

Horticulture 50, 90 

Humanities 67 

Hygiene 82 

Journalism 70 

Landscape gardening .... 52 
Languages, modern European. (See 
English, French, German, Spanish.) 

Library us 

Literature. (See English, French, 

German, Spanish, Rural Social 

Science.) 

Majors 39 

Market gardening .... 53 
Massachusetts Agricultural College . 7 
Massachusetts Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station 9 

Mathematics 63 

Microbiology 64 

Military science 80 

Music 74 



Organizations, student 



111 



Physical education .... 82 

Physics 64 

Political science. (See History.) 

Pomology 53 

Poultry husbandry .... 48 

Prizes 112 

Public speaking 71 

Roll of students 129 

Rural social science .... 75 

Rural sociology 77 

Science, division of ... . 55 
Short courses. (See Extension Work.) 
Sociology. (See Economics, Rural So- 
cial Science.) 

Spanish 74 

Student expenses .... 104-111 

Students, roll of 129 

Summer school. (See Extension Work.) 

Trustees, etc 10 

Undergraduate courses . . . 37-82 

Veterinary science .... 65 

Winter school. (See Extension Work.) 

Zoology 66, 90 



THE M. A. C. BULLETIN 

AMHERST, MASS. 
Vol. V. No. 2 February, 1913. 

Published Six Times a Year by the College. 
Jan., Feb., Mar., May, Sept., Oct. 

Entered as Second-Class Matter at the Post Office, Amherst, Mass. 

Public Document No. 31 

FIFTIETH ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 



Part I. 

REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT AND OTHER OFFICERS 
FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDED NOV. 30, 1912. 




BOSTON: 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 

18 Post Office Square. 

1913. 



Public Document No. 31 

FIFTIETH ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 



PART I. 



Report of the President and Other Officers 
for Fiscal Year ended Nov. 30, 1912. 



February, 1913. 




BOSTON: 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 

18 Post Office Square. 

1913. 



Approved by 
The State Board of Publication. 



<&t)t Ccmnrflntomltt) oi fflaB8at\)imttz. 



Massachusetts Agricultural College, 
Amherst, Dec. 2, 1912. 

To His Excellency Eugene N. Foss. 

Sir: — On behalf of the trustees of the Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural College I have the honor to transmit herewith, to Your 
Excellency and the Honorable Council, Part I. of the fiftieth 
annual report of the trustees, for the fiscal year ended Nov. 30, 
1912, this being the report to the corporation of the president and 
other officers of the college. 

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD, 

President. 



REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE COLLEGE. 



Gentlemen of the Corporation. 

I herewith submit my annual report as president of the Mas- 
sachusetts Agricultural College. 

Each administrative officer has been asked to present a resume 
of the year's work coming under his jurisdiction, and this material 
has been freely utilized in the present report. Following the 
precedent of a year ago, the report divides itself into three fairly 
distinct portions : — 

1. A Review of the Yeae (page 5). 

2. A Statement of Immediate Needs (page 23). 

3. The Relation of the College to the Organization of 
Massachusetts Agriculture and Country Life (page 28). 

These discussions are followed by the usual data concerning 
students, etc., and by the annual report of the treasurer of the 
institution. 

A REVIEW OF THE YEAR. 

Attendance. 

The attendance of students enrolled in the four years' course at 
this date is 502, an increase of 25 over the enrollment of a year 
ago. In addition to this enrollment there are 22 members of 
the graduate school, and 31 students registered in college classes 
as "unclassified" students. Therefore, the total number of 
students doing work of college grade is 555, an increase of 34 
over the total enrollment of last year. The entering class this 
fall numbered 184, a small increase over the number entering 
last year. (See Table I.) 

Nearly 86 per cent, of those entering this year come from Mas- 
sachusetts, and 8 other States are represented. The proportion 
of non-residents does not seem to have decreased, although the 
rule requiring a tuition fee from such students is now in force. 



6 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [Feb. 

Every county in Massachusetts, with the exception of Nantucket, 
is represented in the present freshman class, Middlesex County 
sending the largest number, which is 34, or nearly 22 per cent., 
of the total number entering. (See Table V.) 

One-fifth of the class are undecided as to their intended vo- 
cation; over one-third of the entire class express their intention 
of following some line of professional agriculture or horticulture 
as their life work, and about two-fifths more signify their in- 
tention of entering some vocation in practical agriculture or 
horticulture; nearly 94 per cent, of those having made a decision, 
therefore, intend to follow an agricultural vocation. Twenty-six 
per cent, of the fathers of the members of the freshman class are 
engaged in agriculture or horticulture, and about the same per 
cent, are business men. Approximately one-third of the class 
come from farms, and two-fifths have had no farm experience 
whatever. The average age of the entering class is 19.22 years. 
All of these statistics show practically the same results as those 
compiled for the class entering one year ago. (See Table V.) 

Appropriations. 
The trustees presented to the Legislature of 1912 requests for 
special appropriations amounting to approximately $386,000, the 
principal items in the list being an agricultural building, a stu- 
dents' dormitory, an addition to French Hall, and an addition to 
Draper Hall; of this amount $80,000 was granted, providing for 
the addition to Draper Hall, sewers, repairs, improvements and 
equipment. An increase of $109,000 in current annual appropria- 
tions was asked, and a large portion of it was granted, making the 
total annual income from the State $250,000. (See Table II.) 

Construction and Repairs. 

Six buildings have been completed during the past year, namely, 
the dairy building (Flint Laboratory), completed about the middle 
of August at a cost of $75,000, the apiary, completed in June at 
a cost of $3,000, and four much-needed buildings for the poultry 
department. 

There have been numerous repairs and improvements during 
the year, probably the most noticeable of which is the painting 
of many of the college buildings, in colors recommended by our 



1913.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 7 

consulting architect. For example, several of the frame buildings 
have been painted a colonial gray, trimmed with "M. A. C. white." 

One of the most needed improvements has been the building 
of the extension to the dining hall. This change is not quite com- 
pleted. The addition provides a fine separate lunch room, and 
also increases the seating capacity of the main dining hall by 120. 
The maximum capacity of the dining quarters is now not far 
from 800. 

Other improvements have been the remodeling of the offices 
of the treasurer in south college, the refitting of the laboratory on 
the third floor of the chemical building, the fitting up of a new 
bacteriological room in the basement of the veterinary building, 
the enlargement of the agronomy laboratory in south college; also 
an extension to the power plant which was very much needed and 
which gives the necessary room for storage for general supplies. 
There have also been many minor repairs and improvements. 

Commencement. 
The annual commencement occurred June 19. At that time the 
degree of Bachelor of Science was conferred on 83 men, thus 
making the class about a third larger than any class previously 
graduating. The college also conferred the degree of Master of 
Science on one candidate, and the degree of Doctor of Philosophy 
on one. Hon. Charles W. Garfield of Grand Rapids, Mich., de- 
livered the commencement address on "The Business Conscience." 
The Lieutenant-Governor, Hon. Robert Luce, was present as the 
representative of the Commonwealth. The attendance at the 
alumni dinner was 230. 

Summer Confeeence. 

The summer school of 1912 was omitted. There was held, how- 
ever, the third annual "Conference for Rural Leaders," the 
enrollment at which was 184. In this connection there was for 
the second year a large and interesting exhibit of rural social 
work, illustrating various forms of the service which is being 
undertaken for the betterment of rural communities. 

The conference this year was not only very satisfactory in its 
program and in the attendance, but it was particularly notable 
by reason of the fact that it was the result of the co-operation of a 



8 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



[Feb. 



number of different institutions and agencies interested in coun- 
try life, the college serving chiefly as a clearing-house by which 
these institutions participated in the program. The following 
organizations co-operated with the college and were officially 
represented: Federation of Churches of Massachusetts; State 
Board of Education; Free Public Library Commission; Mas- 
sachusetts Civic League; State Board of Health; County Work 
of Y. M. C. A.; County Work of Y. W. C. A.; New England 
Home Economics Association; the Russell Sage Foundation; 
the Massachusetts Board of Home Missions; Smith's Agricultural 
School; American Civic Association; New York Child Welfare 
Exhibit; Massachusetts Society for Prevention of Cruelty to 
Children. 

The Winter School. 
The attendance at the winter school of 1912 was 131, this 
number being slightly larger than that of the previous year. The 
poultry course, which was given during the last two weeks of the 
winter school, brought an additional number of persons to the 
college. At the close of the winter school the annual farmers' 
week was held; over a thousand people registered during these 
three days of instruction. 

Visits of Outside Associations. 
During the year numerous associations, not officially identified 
with the institution, have held meetings at the college; the fol- 
lowing is a list, doubtless incomplete, of such meetings : — 



February 7, 8. Apiary Inspectors of Northeastern United States and 
Canada. 

March 5. Tenth District Massachusetts State Poultry Associa- 

tion. 

March 10. Connecticut Valley Breeders' Association. 

March 13. Massachusetts Dairymen's Association. 

March 15. Massachusetts Sheep Breeders' Association. 

June 13. Hampshire, Hampden and Franklin Beekeepers' Asso- 

ciation. 

June 26, 27. Library Institute (Auspices of Free Public Library 
Commission). 

October 14. Hampshire, Hampden and Franklin Beekeepers' Asso- 

ciation. 



1913.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 



The Major System. 

At the beginning of the current college year a system of major 
subjects became effective. This is an arrangement whereby at 
the close of the sophomore year each student is required to elect 
a specific subject in one of those departments offering work 
organized as a major. During the junior and senior years the 
student is required to take a minimum of thirty hours' work in 
his major subject, a minimum of fifteen hours in the divisions of 
the humanities and rural social science, and a minimum of fifteen 
hours additional which may be elected at will by the student. 

Each student is under the supervision of a major adviser, who 
ordinarily is the head of the department offering the major course. 

At present the following subjects are open as major courses; 
the titles of the major courses, and the number of juniors electing 
each major, are indicated in the table (obviously, the major 
system is not yet in complete operation, owing to the fact that 
members of the present senior class were unable to elect a major 
in the prescribed manner) : — 

Agriculture, 11 

Agronomy, 2 

Animal husbandry, 11 

Dairying, 2 

Poultry husbandry, 3 

General horticulture, . . . 4 

Floriculture, 5 

Forestry, - 

Landscape gardening, . . 18 

Pomology, 25 

Agricultural chemistry, . . . 11 

Economic entomology, ...:...... 6 

Plant physiology and pathology, ........ 1 

Agricultural education, 3 



Total, • 102 

New Appointments. 
The following appointments to major positions on the teaching 
and extension service staff have been made by the trustees during 
the year : — 



10 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [Feb. 

Charles E. Marshall was elected director of the graduate school 
and professor of microbiology. Dr. Marshall comes from the 
Michigan Agricultural College, where for many years he has been 
head of the department of bacteriology. Dr. Marshall was trained 
chiefly at the University of Michigan, from which he holds the 
degree of Doctor of Philosophy. At the Michigan Agricultural 
College he developed the work of his department both in scientific 
investigation and in the solution of practical problems confronting 
the farmers of the State. He was also vice-director of the ex- 
periment station. Dr. Marshall is one of the foremost micro- 
biologists of the country, is an active leader in many scientific 
associations, and is a recognized authority in the department of 
learning to which he gives his chief attention. 

William D. Clark was elected professor of forestry in place of 
Associate Professor Moon, resigned. Professor Clark graduated 
from the classical course of Yale University and from the forestry 
school at the same institution. He has had a wide experience in 
forestry, which has taken him to many forests of the United States, 
including those of Porto Rico, Texas and the Rocky Mountains. 
For the past three years he has been connected with the school of 
forestry at the Pennsylvania State College. 

Ernest Anderson was elected assistant professor of general and 
physical chemistry. Dr. Anderson received the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts at Trinity College, Texas, in 1903. Later he graduated 
at the University of Texas and pursued graduate study at that 
institution. In 1906 he entered the University of Chicago as an 
advanced student in chemistry and as an assistant on the teach- 
ing force of that department. In 1909 he was granted the degree 
of Doctor of Philosophy from that university. Dr. Anderson's 
work, in addition to that of teaching, has led him into chemical 
research under one of the foremost research chemists in the country. 

Ezra L. Morgan was appointed community field agent in the 
extension service. Mr. Morgan was reared on a farm in the 
middle west, and graduated from the McKendree College, 111., 
in 1904. Subsequently he spent six years in county Y. M. C. A. 
work. For the past two years he has been engaged in graduate 
study in economics and rural sociology at the University of Wis- 
consin, which institution granted him the degree of Master of 
Arts in 1912. 



1913.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 



11 



Orion A. Morton was elected to a vacancy in the department 
of agricultural education occasioned by the resignation of Floyd 
B. Jenks. His work is chiefly in the extension service and will 
consist in part of the development of boys and girls' clubs through- 
out the State. Mr. Morton is a normal school graduate and has 
spent several seasons at the summer schools of the Hyannis 
Normal School, the Massachusetts Agricultural College, and the 
Teachers' College, New York City. He was for many years 
superintendent of public schools at Marlborough, Mass., where 
he made a notable reputation as an able administrator and as an 
educator of liberal views. 

Henry E. Smith was elected assistant professor of English. 
Professor Smith received his advanced training at the University 
of Chicago and at Yale University where he earned the degree of 
Master of Arts. He has had wide experience as a teacher, having 
served on the faculty of the North Dakota Agricultural College, 
the Washington State Normal School, Tabor College, Iowa, and 
Westminster College. 

The following-named instructors and other officers of the in- 
stitution have been engaged during the year: — 





In the Academic Departments. 




Position. 


Name. 


Institution 

from which graduated, 

and Degrees. 


Year 

of 
Gradu- 
ation. 


Assistant in chemistry, 

Instructor in poultry hus- 
bandry. 
Instructor in pomology, 

Buttermaker, 

Assistant in physical educa- 
tion. 
Instructor in agronomy, 

Instructor in English and 
public speaking. 


Robert H. Bogue, . 
Abbott A. Brown, . 
Walter W. Chenoweth, . 
Samuel Coons, 
William J. Fitzmaurice, . 
Elmer M. McDonald, 
Walter E. Prince, 


Tufts College, B.Sc, . 

University of Wisconsin, 

B.Sc. Agr. 
University of Missouri, 

M.Sc.,B.A. 

University of Illinois, 

B.Sc. Agr. 
Brown University, B.A., 

M.A. 


1912 
1912 
1912 

1910 
1907 



In the Experiment Station. 



Assistant chemist, 
Secretary to the director, 
Assistant in horticulture, 



Carlos L. Beals, 
Benjamin G. Southwick, 
Howard A. Turner, . 



Massachusetts Agricultural 

College, B.Sc. 
Massachusetts Agricultural 

College, B.Sc. 
Massachusetts Agricultural 

College, B.Sc. 



1912 
1912 
1912 



12 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



[Feb. 



In the Extension Service. 







Institution 


Year 
of 
Gradu- 
ation. 


Position. 


Name. 


from which graduated, 






and Degrees. 


Expert in farm management, 


Herbert J. Baker, 1 . 


Massachusetts Agricultural 
College, B.Sc. 


1911 


Supervisor of correspond- 


Arthur T. Dailey, . 


University of Vermont, 


1911 


ence courses. 




B.Sc. 




Field agent, Barnstable 


Albert W. Doolittle (part 


- 


- 


County. 


time). 






Instructor in pomology, 


Ralph W. Rees, 


Oregon Agricultural College, 
B.Sc. 


1911 



1 Transferred from the experiment station. 

In the Clerical Farce. 

Cashier, treasurer's office, ........ Harold A. Chane. 

Clerk, department of chemistry, Miss Lina Fisheb. 

Stenographer, experiment station, Miss Grace E. Gallond. 

Clerk, extension service, Miss Hannah Griffin. 

Clerk, department of poultry husbandry Miss Mart R. Kingsbury. 

Clerk, dean's office Miss Virginia Noble. 

Stenographer, division of horticulture, Miss Gladys E. Russell. 



Thomas Canavan. 
The following resolutions on the death of Mr. Thomas Canavan, 
which occurred July 14, 1912, were adopted by the trustees' 
committee on buildings and grounds and subsequently by the 
Board of Trustees : — 

Mr. Thomas Canavan, who passed away July 14, 1912, was for forty- 
five years the faithful and loyal servant of the Massachusetts Agricultural 
College. His efficient services were always highly valued; his personality 
gained for him universal respect, and his kindly attitude toward all en- 
deared him to those with whom he came in contact. 

The trustees of this institution join his many friends among alumni, 
faculty, and students in mourning his loss, and hereby desire to record 
their expression of sympathy to his daughter and other relatives in these 
days of sorrow. 

Resignations. 
S. Francis Howard, after a year's leave of absence which was 
spent in study at Johns Hopkins University, and which gained 
for him the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, resigned as assistant 
professor of chemistry. Professor Howard has devoted fourteen 
years to efficient work in teaching in the department of chemistry. 
As a loyal alumnus, hard-working teacher, and earnest man, 
Professor Howard had made a splendid record of service. 



1913. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 



13 



Frederick F. Moon resigned as head of the departmeDt of 
forestry to accept a similar position at Syracuse University. 
Professor Moon succeeded in his two years' incumbency of this 
position in establishing the department on a sound basis and the 
teaching on a high level of effectiveness and enthusiasm. 

Floyd B. Jenks resigned his position in the department of 
agricultural education to accept a call as expert in agricultural 
education in the United States Bureau of Education. Professor 
Jenks had laid good foundations for a plan of organized agricultural 
education as a part of the State public school system. 

The following table indicates all resignations that have occurred 
during the year: — 



Position. 



Name. 



Successor. 



Assistant in chemistry, 

Secretary to the director of the experi- 
ment station. 
Clerk, division of horticulture, . 

Assistant professor of chemistry, 

Supervisor of correspondence courses, . 

Assistant professor of agricultural edu- 
cation. 
Associate professor of forestry, . 

Extension instructor in pomology, 

Assistant, experiment station, 

Secretary to director of experiment 

station. 
Assistant in horticulture, experiment 

station. 
Assistant in chemistry, 

Instructor in English and public 
sing. 



Harold S. Adams, 
Herbert J. Baker, 1 . 
Helen Granger, 
S. Francis Howard, . 
Albert R. Jenks, 
Floyd B. Jenks, 
Frederick F. Moon, . 
Alvah J. Norman, 
George R. Pierce, 
Benjamin G. Southwick, 
Howard A. Turner, . 
William A. Turner, . 
Howard DeF. Widger, 



Robert H. Bogue. 
Benjamin G. Southwick. 
Gladys E. Russell. 

Arthur T. Dailey. 
Orion A'. Morton. 
William D. Clark. 
Ralph W. Rees. 



Walter E. Prince. 



1 Transferred to extension service. 



Change in Title of Officers of the Institution. 



Name. 


Former Title. 


Present Title. 


Edward M. Lewis, . 
Alexander E. Cance, 
Clarence E. Gordon, 
Sidney B. Haskell, . 
Charles A. Peters, . 


Assistant dean and assistant pro- 
fessor of literature. 

Assistant professor of agricultural 
economics. 

Assistant professor of zoology 
and geology. 

Assistant professor of agronomy, 

Assistant professor of inorganic 
and soil chemistry. 


Associate dean and professor of 
literature. 

Associate professor of agricul- 
tural economics. 

Associate professor of zoology 
and geology. 

Associate professor of agronomy. 

Associate professor of inorganic 
and soil chemistry. 



14 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [Feb. 



The Year in the Departments of Instruction. 

In the Division of Agriculture. — Progress has been made in 
furnishing the division of agriculture with much-needed room 
and equipment. Flint Laboratory, the new dairy building, was 
finished and available for use Sept. 1, 1912; it has been made 
temporary headquarters for the division, furnishing offices for all 
the departments and several classrooms and laboratories other 
than those used by the dairy department. The whole building, 
however, should, in the very near future, be available for the uses 
for which it was designed, namely, dairy instruction and investi- 
gation. The equipment and machinery for this building, including 
refrigerating machinery, have been installed and will give oppor- 
tunity for the best instruction in all branches of the dairy business. 
The teaching force of this department has been increased by the 
addition of an assistant who will devote most of his time to the 
laboratory work. 

In the department of animal husbandry, the dedication of the 
Grinnell Arena during farmers' week should be mentioned. The 
work of the department has also been improved by the construc- 
tion of a sheep barn, and the purchase of sheep for instructional 
purposes. A pair of pure bred Percheron mares have also been 
purchased during the year. 

The equipment of the department of poultry husbandry has 
been increased by the addition of a laboratory building, a breeding 
house, the completion of a long laying house and facilities for 
experimental incubation, apart from the student incubator cellar. 
The increasing work of this department has demanded the services 
of an additional instructor. Through the extension office many 
calls come for the services of the head of this department, and the 
additional teaching assistance will give him more time to devote 
to this outside work. 

The equipment of the department of agronomy has been some- 
what increased by fitting up the laboratory in the basement of 
south college, formerly used by the department of dairying. This 
increase, however, does not keep pace with the increased registra- 
tion of students. The instruction force of this department has 
been supplemented by the employment of another instructor. 

The department of farm administration has begun a series of 



1913.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 15 

field investigations in farm management, under a co-operative 
arrangement between the extension service and the office of farm 
management of the United States Department of Agriculture. 

The addition of 62 acres of land adjoining the south boundary 
of the college farm has not heretofore been noted. This is excellent 
land, but not now in a high state of cultivation; a good deal of 
it has been cleared during the year and will be brought into good 
tilth as soon as possible. 

In the Division of Horticulture. — The work in the various de- 
partments of this division has, during the past year, progressed 
along much the same lines as followed formerly. The gardens, 
orchards and greenhouses are used extensively as laboratories and 
are considered as of utmost value in augmenting the classroom 
instruction given in the different studies. The new fruit-packing 
and storage building is constantly proving its worth as a laboratory 
for those specializing in pomology. 

The department of landscape gardening is now entirely re- 
sponsible for the care of the college grounds; this arrangement 
has been observed for about three years and the advantage of 
assigning the full responsibility to one department is constantly 
in evidence; a marked improvement has been noted during the 
past year in the general appearance of the lawns, walks and drives 
of the campus. 

In the Division of Science. — The chairman of the division 
states that "there has been no change in organization since the 
last catalogue was prepared. The several departments are work- 
ing in harmony, although necessarily very independently of each 
other as relates to the collegiate work. 

"I am of the opinion, gained from talks with the men at the 
head of the several departments, that the most pressing need 
at the present time, from the academic point of view, is a major 
course in pure agricultural science. By this is meant a course 
that would fit graduates to take up lines of scientific work in 
agricultural or other scientific institutions, and enable them to 
hold their own with graduates of other institutions that make 
a specialty of fitting men for scientific teaching and investiga- 
tion." 

In the Division of the Humanities. — The division, in the opinion 
of its head, is in a "state of flux until it is seen how the major 



16 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [Feb. 

system of courses will operate. There may be an elimination of 
some courses unfit to survive by the gravitation of students in 
search of the best work for their minor requirements. It will 
take a year or two more to see clearly how the elective courses 
will tend." 

There are several courses in the division with small registra- 
tion; and unless these courses are more freely elected, doubtless 
they should be dropped. It is important to gather equipment 
about the best courses, make them profitable and interesting, 
and use the energies of the faculty where they will count for 
greatest fruitage. The head of the division places emphasis upon 
a wider study of literature as well as on the need of increasing 
somewhat the opportunities for the study of general narrative 
history in order to enable students to get historic facts for the 
background of their other work. 

Probably no departments of the institution appreciate the 
limitations of our present library facilities so fully as the various 
departments in this division. The library quarters are very 
much restricted. The ventilation is not good. There is neither 
room nor table space for individual work. In fact, the whole 
equipment is entirely inadequate for satisfactory work. A college 
library in no small degree determines the standing of the insti- 
tution. If facilities for good library work are absent, it seriously 
affects the efficiency of the scholarship. 

The departments feel seriously the need of a building which 
will house all the departments of the division of the humanities 
under one roof. As it is, the various departments, and even the 
instructors, are scattered about the campus, — many of them 
without definite headquarters. Under these conditions, esprit de 
corps, concentration of effort, and administrative efficiency are 
difficult to maintain. 

In the Division of Rural Social Science. — This division con- 
sists of the three departments of agricultural education, agri- 
cultural economics and rural sociology. 

In agricultural education the effort thus far in the collegiate 
work has been to prepare teachers for agricultural high schools. 
The number of men doing this work has been somewhat dis- 
appointing; this is probably due in part not only to the fact that 
commercial positions pay larger salaries, but that to the average 



1913.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 17 

man the work is more attractive. Many men are willing to teach 
only as a last resort. Our students, perhaps, do not yet sufficiently 
realize the opportunities for interesting work and helpful service 
that are available to the teacher of agriculture. The salaries paid 
are not excessive, but they are reasonably fair. It is to be said 
that the present enrollment in the various courses offered in the 
department shows a gratifying increase. 

In the department of agricultural economics the main strength 
of the work lies at present in the course required of all sophomores. 
This course gives to all our students an introduction to the ec- 
onomic problems that confront the agricultural business. There 
are also advanced students who are investigating some of these 
problems in a specialized way. 

The department of rural sociology should have an introductory 
course required of all students, but it has not as yet been possible 
to bring that about. When that is done, all our students before 
entering the junior year will have had an introduction to the whole 
field of the agricultural problem, in its practical, scientific, eco- 
nomic and social aspects. 

There is a strong feeling on the part of the instructors in agri- 
cultural economics and rural sociology that majors should be 
offered in both of these departments in order that men may 
specialize and fit themselves for some of the new positions that 
are opening for men trained in these subjects. 

In the General Departments. Library. — During the past year 
2,535 accessions were made to the library collection; the total 
number of volumes now in the library exceeds 40,000. The task 
of recataloguing has continued with gratifying rapidity; in the 
last year over 7,700 books were recatalogued, and the total 
number recatalogued since the work was started in 1909 is 
18,430. 

About a year ago the library publicly announced that it was 
prepared to loan collections of books on agriculture and country 
life to libraries in the State; in ten months 37 of these circulating 
libraries were sent out; an average of 24 books and pamphlets 
were shipped each time and these were widely distributed through 
the local libraries. 

The faculty and students now use the library to a greater extent 
than ever before, and are constantly making it a real educational 



18 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [Feb. 

laboratory. For this and other reasons the need of adequate 
library space is felt very keenly by all. 

Military Science. — During the past year the regiment has 
been divided into two battalions of three companies each and a 
band; the companies average about 55 men. All the members of 
the three lower classes are required to drill, and at present 19 
members of the senior class are electing drill, making the total 
enrollment in the military department 430. No men are excused 
permanently from drill; those physically unable to drill are re- 
quired to work in the office or on the rifle ranges. The general 
instructions of the war department have been fully complied 
with; three hours of practical work a week during drill periods are 
required of all students enrolled in the department. In addition, 
theoretical instruction is given to members of the sophomore and 
junior classes one hour a week during the year. Great interest 
is still maintained in rifle practice; the indoor rifle team again 
won the intercollegiate championship of the United States, while 
the outdoor team won second place. 

Physical Education and Hygiene. — The work of the department 
during the past year has been conducted along the following 
lines : — 

1. The physical examination of each freshman to ascertain the 
condition of health and physical development, and to detect 
defects which may exist, especially in sight, hearing, heart and 
lungs. Each person thus examined is advised as to the proper 
form of exercise to take to suit his individual condition. The 
examination and interview require about thirty minutes for each 
man. 

2. The freshman class receive instruction in physiology and 
personal hygiene through a course of lectures given by the phys- 
ical director. 

3. During the winter months the department requires three 
hours of physical exercise per week of each member of the three 
lower classes. Those men who have been found by examination 
to be physically normal are permitted to elect one of the several 
athletic activities; those who have been found to be below normal, 
physically, are given individual instruction. Walking trips may 
be substituted for physical exercise in the gymnasium; during the 
past year from 75 to 100 students elected this form of exercise. 



1913.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 19 

4. The work of the indoor classes of from 30 to 40 men con- 
sists of gymnastic exercises and such games as basket ball and 
indoor baseball. 

5. The physical director is general manager of athletics, super- 
vising the arrangements for contests with other colleges, buying 
the supplies for the teams, assisting in the coaching, and having 
final control of the conduct of players and games, and encouraging 
the student body to compete in intramural contests. 

The Graduate School. 
During the year Dr. Charles E. Marshall of the Michigan 
Agricultural College was elected to the position of director of 
the graduate school. Dr. Marshall contemplates making in the 
near future a thorough study of the organization and work of 
graduate schools of agriculture and allied sciences, both in this 
country and abroad. After his return to the college, which will 
be prior to the opening of the next college year, it is expected 
that he will make a full report to the faculty and trustees, 
embodying recommendations as to the future development of 
the graduate school at this institution. 

The Year in the Experiment Station. 

I regret to report that during the spring Dr. W. P. Brooks, 
director of the experiment station, became seriously ill. He was 
immediately granted a leave of absence and is still on leave. 
During the autumn his convalescence has been rapid, and it is 
sincerely hoped that in the near future he will again be at his 
important post with recovered strength. 

Agricultural Department. — The work of experimentation with 
fertilizers on various plants has gone on as in the past. The 
Graves' orchard yielded heavily, the estimated value of the fruit 
being $500. The asparagus field at Concord bore a large crop for 
its fourth year's cutting, and the lightness of the attack of rust 
that it suffered gives promise of satisfactory results next year. 
The cranberry bog is in excellent condition, and while the crop was 
light this year, a maximum yield is anticipated for next season. 

Botanical Department. — The routine work of this department 
has been similar to that of other years, consisting of the diagnosis 



20 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [Feb. 

of diseases, determination of plants, correspondence of a technical 
nature, seed germination, separation and purity testing. 

Department of Plant and Animal Chemistry, (a) During the 
year the research work has made substantial progress; at present, 
four experts give practically their entire time to this activity. 

(&) The inspections have gone on with satisfaction; during 
the year over 1,100 samples of fertilizers and 1,000 samples of 
feedstuffs have been collected and analyzed. 

(c) Samples of agricultural products such as milk, cream, con- 
centrated and coarse fodders, soils, waste products suitable for 
fertilizing purposes, waters, vinegars and the like are constantly 
being received, examined and reported upon. 

(d) Work in connection with animal nutrition includes the 
examination of feedstuffs, milk and butter, and in plant nutri- 
tion, the analysis of crops and soils. 

Department of Entomology. — Over a thousand field tests have 
been made in studying the burning of foliage by insecticides. 
Good progress is noted in studying parasites. Observations on 
dates of hatching of scale insects have continued, and also the 
study of methods of controlling the wire worm. Experiments 
were for several months conducted on the onion maggot, and 
several commercial insecticides were tested. 

In apiculture, the work on color vision of bees is progressing; 
photographic and numerical records have been kept. Study has 
been given upon an instrument for counting hive bees as they 
pass into a hive, and upon the transportation of bees without 
combs. Important observations have been made on the use of 
bees in greenhouses. 

Department of Horticulture. — The experimental work of the 
year has gone on without special incident; studies on the cli- 
matology of the apple have been published during the year and 
constitute a notable contribution to the scientific knowledge of 
pomology. The work in plant breeding has been making excellent 
progress. 

Department of Poultry Husbandry. — Three lines of experimen- 
tation are being undertaken: (1) individuality in hens, studied 
by trapnesting, and subsequently determining the egg-yield, 
percentage of fertility, and hatchability; (2) digestion experiment 
to determine value of a widely advertised hen food; (3) effect of 
food on flavor and odor of eggs. 



1913.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 21 

Department of Meteorology. — The work of the year has neces- 
sarily followed the routine of previous years; co-operation with 
the Weather Bureau has been continued as usual, and the regular 
monthly issue of the weather bulletin has been kept up. 

Department of Veterinary Science. — Investigation of obscure 
diseases of animals has been carried on in response to requests for 
information, as, for example, the recent definite determination 
of white diarrhoea in chicks. 

The Year in the Extension Service. 

No attempt has been made to enlarge the activities of the 
service during the past year, but a consistent effort has been made 
to organize, systematize and to put on a sounder basis the different 
lines of work which we are called upon to do. The work on the 
whole for the year has progressed in a satisfactory manner, and 
has unquestionably grown in the respect of the people of the 
State. The annual appropriation for this work was increased 
from $20,000 to $50,000 by the Legislature of 1912. 

Considerable time has been spent in planning a type of or- 
ganization which will enable every department of the college to 
contribute in some measure to the work of the service, and at the 
same time insure unity, harmony and efficiency of administration 
and teaching. To the end that the work of other institutions 
might be studied, the director made a trip to institutions in 
Wisconsin, Iowa, Nebraska, Kansas, Missouri, Illinois and Indiana. 
When the material and information obtained on this trip can be 
worked over, valuable suggestions for the work here will be forth- 
coming. 

New Features of the Work during 1912. 

A very successful apple-packing school was conducted by the de- 
partment of pomology, assisted by an expert from Hood River, Ore. 

Extension schools five days in length were held in five towns. 
Judging from the reports which have come from these com- 
munities, these schools are the best pieces of extension service 
carried on away from the college. 

Work by the extension service in community studies has been 
started, involving a definite policy and program for co-operation 
of all agencies within communities, for social, economic, religious 
and educational advancement. 



22 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [Feb. 

The boys' and girls' club work is being further organized. Ex- 
hibits and round-up meetings have been held this fall. Schools 
all over the State are rapidly being brought into line for work next 
year. The records in a contest for boys, the prizes in which will 
be free trips to Washington, Boston and farmers' week at Am- 
herst, are now nearly complete. 

Field agent work has been started in Barnstable County. 

A definite program for work in civic improvement is being 
developed. 

Through the generosity of a friend of the college, the services 
of a woman expert in home economics were given to the college 
for a period of three months during the year. She gave instruction 
in domestic science in the extension schools, and visited several 
towns. The need of this work was shown by its immediate pop- 
ularity and the large number of requests which at once came from 
several communities for more of this teaching. 

Fourteen stock-judging contests for boys were arranged and 
conducted at as many agricultural fairs. More than a hundred 
boys competed, and a goodly number participated in the final 
contest at Brockton, in which scholarships at the college were 
offered as prizes. 

Co-operation with Other Organizations. 

The policy of co-operating with other worthy organizations in 
any useful work which comes within the province of the agricul- 
tural college is being adhered to. Further co-operation between 
the organizations mentioned on pages 27-28 of the 1911 report 
has taken place. 

New relationships have been established. This year the Pitts- 
field and Milford Y. M. C. A.'s will have a series of meetings. A 
good deal of work has been done for the western Hampshire board 
of trade. Assistance has been rendered the social service com- 
mission of the Massachusetts Federation of Churches. Several 
organizations not previously represented held meetings at the 
college during farmers' week. 

Due to some visits of extension men to other State institutions, 
twenty-five farm superintendents and other officers of these in- 
stitutions attended farmers' week. 



1913.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 23 

A desire and willingness on the part of existing organizations 
all over the State to co-operate in movements for upbuilding the 
rural life of the Commonwealth is found to be almost universal. 

So many of the recommendations made on pages 30-31 of the 
1911 report still remain to be carried out that it seems almost 
useless to add more at the present time. Of those mentioned, the 
director desires to emphasize two, and to ask that these be given 
consideration before other things are taken up : — 

1. That a travelling instructor, provided with an automobile and equip- 
ment, be engaged for demonstration work in rural districts. 

2. That a woman with a training in home economics, who possesses 
good organizing ability, be engaged for extension work in home economics 
and domestic science. 

There will be need of more money by the end of the present 
year. Every effort should be made to secure the passage by 
Congress of the agricultural extension bill. Even though this 
passes, appropriations of at least $10,000 for specific purposes in 
addition to what the State is now giving should be asked for in 
the budget that is to be made up in October, 1913. 

THE IMMEDIATE NEEDS OF THE COLLEGE. 

Fundamentally, the need of increased appropriations, both for 
maintenance and for buildings, is due in part to the growth of the 
college in number of students, but also in part to the increased 
activities of the college made necessary by the rapidly enlarging 
field of agricultural research, instruction and dissemination. Our 
understanding of the rural problem in Massachusetts is constantly 
broadening, and as our conception of the problem broadens, the 
necessity of broadening the work of the college in order to help 
solve the problem also develops. 

No attempt is made at this point to discuss the needs of the 
college for increased appropriations, except those that are of 
immediate consequence. Perhaps the most effective way of in- 
dicating the present needs of the college is to outline the reasons 
that underlie the action of the trustees in formulating the legis- 
lative budget for the ensuing year. 



24 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



[Feb. 



The Legislative Budget for 1913. 
The budget to be presented to the Legislature of 1913, as ap- 
proved by the Board of Trustees at its meeting in Boston, Nov. 
8, 1912, may be summarized as follows : — 

For Increase in Current Annual Appropriations. 



Available Requested 
for 1913. for 1914. 



Increase. 



Investigation, 

Instruction, 

Repairs, 



$15,000 
75,000 



830,000 
95,000 
15,000 



$15,000 
20,000 
15,000 



$50,000 



For Special Purposes. 

Agricultural building, $210,000 

General improvements and repairs, 40,000 

Land and sewers, - 



Statement of Reasons for Requested Increases in Current Funds. 

For Investigation. — Heretofore the burden of financing in- 
vestigations and experiments carried on by the institution through 
its agricultural experiment station has been borne chiefly by the 
national treasury, from which we have secured for some years 
about three-fourths of the annual cost of the experiment station. 
Last year the Legislature added $4,500 to the investigation item, 
with the unwritten understanding that the major part of it was 
to be used for investigations in poultry culture. There are, how- 
ever, a great many lines of investigation applicable to the needs 
of Massachusetts farmers, and highly important in themselves, 
that are being neglected by the institution simply for lack of 
funds. The trustees ask, therefore, that the annual appropriation 
for investigation be increased from $15,000 a year to $30,000 a 
year. Some of the projects which it is proposed to take up with 
these increased funds are listed as follows : — 

In floriculture : The study of certain plants with regard to their 
value for forcing for winter bloom; the study of factors by which 
the light efficiency of greenhouses may be increased; the effect 



1913.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 25 

of commercial fertilizers on carnations; the effect of different fer- 
tilizers on roses; co-operative experiments with regard to insect 
and fungous diseases troubling greenhouse plants. 

In market gardening: Storage experiments with vegetables, 
both as regards probable preservation and market values. 

In veterinary science: The study of important animal diseases 
along lines that are not being worked out elsewhere in the 
State. 

In microbiology: Investigations in soil bacteriology. This is a 
line of work that is almost completely neglected, and yet of the 
utmost consequence in agricultural science. 

In pomology: Spraying experiments with special reference to 
the aphis and curculio; experiments in soil management in apple 
orchards; experiments with fertilizers in peach orchards; ex- 
periments in plum growing; studies of the adaptation of apple 
varieties. 

Studies of Agricultural Practices and Conditions. — The college 
has been endeavoring for some years to secure sufficient funds to 
prosecute fundamental studies of the actual practices and con- 
ditions under which the farmers of the State are working. For 
example, a thoroughgoing study of present methods of dairy 
management will perhaps do as much as any other one thing to 
assist the dairymen to a larger success, especially if this study is 
combined with a careful investigation of the market conditions 
under which milk is sold and distributed. The milk question is 
perennially before us for discussion, and yet with all that has been 
said the most conspicuous fact is our lack of knowledge of actual 
conditions of production and marketing. There is no single 
appropriation that can be made by the Legislature that will be of 
larger service in settling this problem than an appropriation which 
will permit experts to study thoroughly the conditions which 
surround the business. What has been said of dairy farming 
applies equally to other phases of agriculture in the State. It is 
high time that this institution is supported by the Legislature in 
its desire to study all of those conditions under which the farmer 
must work, and to study with sufficient thoroughness to be of 
practical assistance to him. 



26 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [Feb. 



Instruction. 
The trustees recommend an increase in the annual appropria- 
tion for instruction from $75,000 to $95,000. Although we have 
added considerably to our instruction force in the last few years, 
that staff is still inadequate for the best results, both with respect 
to the subjects now being taught and with respect to the intro- 
duction of new subjects made imperative by our rapidly expanding 
knowledge of agriculture and the rapidly increasing calls for 
highly trained men. Instructors are needed in English, physical 
education, zoology, chemistry, botany, landscape gardening and 
agronomy. In microbiology a trained teacher and investigator is 
needed immediately in order to give the courses already planned. 
For some years we have been endeavoring to establish a depart- 
ment of rural engineering. This important subject has received 
very little attention at our hands, wholly for lack of funds. The 
trustees agree that it is the duty of the college to bring to the 
attention of the people of the State more completely than we are 
now enabled to do the ways by which the college can render service 
to all those interested in agriculture and country life; provision 
should be made for a man to develop publicity work. There is 
also a necessity for some increase in salaries. It has not been the 
policy of the college to increase every instructor's salary every 
year, but we do desire to pay salaries commensurate with the 
services of well-trained and efficient teachers. There is no doubt 
but our men as a rule are underpaid in comparison with professors 
in some of the liberal-arts colleges, and in comparison with men 
doing similar work in western agricultural colleges. 

Repairs. 
Last year the trustees asked for an increase of $30,000 in current 
annual appropriations to be divided equally in purchase of equip- 
ment and in repairs. The Legislature granted an increase of half 
that amount, and the trustees have decided to make that apply to 
equipment. The argument for a current annual appropriation for 
repairs still holds. In a plant inventoried approximately at 
$600,000, an item of $15,000 a year for general repairs is certainly 
not excessive. It is an annual charge that cannot be disregarded. 
It should be made a part of the annual appropriation. 



1913.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 27 



Statement concerning Requests for Special Appropriations. 
An Agricultural Building. — The main item which the trustees 
desire to press before the Legislature this winter as a special 
appropriation is one of $210,000 for an agricultural building. I 
cannot do better than to quote from my report of a year ago con- 
cerning the need of this building : — 

Although the college has been open to students nearly forty-five years, 
it has never had a building devoted specifically to agricultural teaching. 

Practically every agricultural college in the country finds it necessary 
and desirable to make such a building one of the most important on the 
campus. 

The rapid increase in our agricultural students has crowded the agricul- 
tural departments out of their old quarters. ■ It is almost impossible to 
do efficient teaching under present conditions. 

The winter short-course students are also inadequately provided for. 

The proposed building will have three stories and a basement, and 
contain offices, classrooms, and laboratories for the departments of farm 
administration, agronomy, animal husbandry and agricultural engineering. 
It is proposed to erect a fireproof building and to equip it in harmony 
with the recent developments in these lines of work. 

General Improvements. — The trustees ask for an appropriation 
of $40,000 as a special fund for general improvements, including 
repairs that will be necessary during the summer of 1913 and prior 
to the time when the item for repairs in the current annual appro- 
priation, which it is hoped the Legislature will make, can become 
available. A large proportion of the items which make up the 
total of $40,000 have been placed in the legislative budget in for- 
mer years, and, of course, the need for these improvements grows 
greater each year. The principal items comprise a general over- 
hauling of south college, which is used partly as dormitory and 
partly as quarters for administrative departments; important 
extension of the water main; an addition to the young stock 
barn, absolutely necessary; the building of a piggery; important 
additions to the poultry plant; new walks; a greatly needed piece 
of macadam road; the construction of a much-needed bungalow 
for men employed regularly at the dairy barn and on the farm. 

The Questions of Land and of Seioers. — There are several prob- 
lems relative to the acquiring of land for horticultural and forestry 



28 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [Feb. 

purposes that have not yet been settled by the trustees for lack 
of adequate data. It is possible, however, that decisions may be 
reached in time to present a resolve to the incoming Legislature 
for appropriations for these purposes. The last Legislature 
passed an act enabling the town of Amherst, to construct an out- 
let for its sewerage system. The act permitted the co-operation 
of the college, with the condition that the college should share in 
the expense. At this time it is not known what this share will 
mean in the way of appropriation, so that no specific amount is 
named in this report. 

Other Needed Buildings. — I dislike to call attention to the fact 
that the trustees have this year omitted from the legislative 
budget important buildings that have heretofore been asked for 
but not granted. This omission is due not to any feeling that the 
ne^d has in any way lessened, but simply to the desire to press 
for the agricultural building. Among so many needs for class- 
rooms and laboratories it is difficult to choose, but the wise thing 
seemed to be to make it clear to the Legislature and to the people 
of the State that our most pressing building need is the agricultural 
building. The other buildings on which the trustees have estimates, 
and which we feel should be built as soon as possible are : — 

Student dormitory, $30,000 

Addition to French hall, 35,000 

THE RELATION OF THE COLLEGE TO THE ORGANIZATION 
OF MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURE AND COUNTRY LIFE. 

In the president's report of one year ago there was a brief 
discussion of "the relationships of the college," in which mention 
was made of the need of co-operation with the public school sys- 
tem, agricultural schools, the normal schools, the State Board 
of Agriculture and voluntary associations. It is impossible to 
consider the work of the college on broad lines without constantly 
recurring to this question of relationships. Our work as a college 
is that of contributing to the solution of the rural problem in 
Massachusetts. There are other agencies and forces also con- 
tributing, each in its own way. There must, therefore, be a 
recognition of the need of working together, and consequently 
of understanding each other's work. There is a tendency to 
develop a multiplication of agencies, owing to the greatly renewed 



1913.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 29 

interest in the affairs of country life. Massachusetts has been 
conservative in this respect, but in some parts of the country 
there is serious overlapping and duplication of effort. The matter 
has become so serious that it really takes on the guise of a national 
question. At a recent meeting of the Association of American 
Agricultural Colleges and Experiment Stations a resolution on 
this subject was introduced. After discussion it was referred to 
the executive committee of the association, with instructions to 
study the problem thus raised and to make the general question 
a prominent subject for discussion at the next annual meeting. 
The resolution was substantially as follows : — 

Whereas, The various agencies for agricultural education in America 
are multiplying with great rapidity, and 

Whereas, We believe that there is danger of serious loss of energy and 
increase of expense, on account of overlapping on the part of these agencies 
as they carry on their work; therefore 

Resolved, That this association advocate the appointment of a National 
Commission on Agricultural Education (preferably a permanent com- 
mission), which shall be charged with the duty of inquiring into, and 
reporting upon, the organization and policy that, in the opinion of the 
commission, should prevail in the expenditure of public moneys provided 
for the United States Department of Agriculture, for State boards, or 
departments, of agriculture^for land-grant colleges, for secondary schools 
of agriculture, or for any other institution for agricultural research, teach- 
ing or extension, to the end that such funds may be applied in the most 
economical, efficient and worthy manner to the production of results of 
permanent value. It will be especially incumbent upon the commission 
to indicate and advise concerning the fundamental functions of these 
various institutions in the upbuilding of American agriculture and country 
life, and their relationships one to the other, so that there may be a mini- 
mum of overlapping, and, on the positive side, a constructive policy of 
definite co-operation. Such a commission might also well become the 
advisory board with respect to the use of private funds for these same 
purposes. 

In connection with the discussion of this resolution it was sug- 
gested that each State should move toward the organization of 
a commission on agricultural education, or of some similar body, 
charged with the duty of ascertaining how the various agricultural 
forces in each State may be co-ordinated. 

Because of the fact that this general subject of bringing to- 
gether in some co-operative way the efforts of various agencies 



30 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



[Feb. 



and institutions interested in agriculture and country life has 
become a national question in the realm of agricultural college 
discussion; and inasmuch as in Massachusetts there are already 
evidences of a need of a clearer understanding of the situation; 
and also because this college cannot do its best work except by 
maintaining proper relationships to other organizations, I have 
thought it timely to discuss at some length the problem thus 
raised, under the title, "The Relation of the College to the Or- 
ganization of Massachusetts Agriculture and Country Life." 



The Outlook for Agriculture in this State. 

The outlook for the agricultural business in Massachusetts was 
never so promising as at the present day. An examination of the 
appended tables shows a really remarkable development in the 
agriculture of the State, in spite of the smaller acreage of im- 
proved land. It is true that values are influenced by the general 
rise of prices; nevertheless, farming is prosperous as compared 
with the situation thirty years ago, or even ten years ago. 

These figures also mean a rapidly growing market, particularly 
for products grown not too far from the consumer. Prices rule 
high as compared with other parts of the country. 

There is also a new interest in agriculture on the part of the 
farmers themselves, on the part of business men and on the part 
of residents of the cities. All these things give us courage to be- 
lieve that we are at the beginning of a great revival of the agri- 
cultural industry in Massachusetts, and, indeed, in all New 
England. 

Agricultural Statistics of Massachusetts (United States Census). 



1880. 



1890. 



1900. 



1910. 



Acreage of land in Massachusetts: — 
(a) Land in farms, .... 

(6) Improved land 

(c) Unimproved land, 

Value of agricultural products, 

Value of product per acre of improved land, 

Rural population 

The population of incorporated^cities, . 



3,359,079 

2,128,311 

1,230,768 

$24,160,881 

$11 33 

866,071 

917,014 



2,998,282 

1,657,024 

1,341,258 

$28,072,500 

$16 94 

736,890 

1,579,234 



3,147,064 

1,292,132 

1,854,932 

$42,298,274 

$32 73 

919,541 

1,809,644 



2,875,941 
1,164,501 
1,711,440 
$59,901,277 
$51 44 
1,103,248 
2,263,168 



1913.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 31 



The Agricultural Advantages which Massachusetts offers. 

We may be compelled to admit that Massachusetts can hardly 
become one of the leading agricultural States quantitatively. 
As compared with Iowa and Illinois, for example, Massachusetts 
cannot hope to figure prominently in farm statistics, although its 
possibilities in value of agricultural products are far greater than 
many of us imagine. But there is every reason why Massachusetts 
can hope to become, and ought to become, a really great agri- 
cultural State qualitatively. It is a small State. It has a fairly 
compact area. It has many varieties of soil and differences of 
altitude. It has markets among the best in the world. It has 
great wealth, public spirit, abundant social machinery. It is a 
land beautiful to look upon. It possesses splendid traditions of 
education. It has been a leader in the industrial, political and 
social life of the nation, and it still retains a large measure of that 
leadership. Those who work its land are largely owners of the 
land, and at the present time most of them are the old New Eng- 
land stock. Its cities and larger villages are numerous, and, as 
a rule, they are connected with other places by trolley lines. There 
are few regions of the State that are necessarily isolated. 

All these things comprise the natural resources and the founda- 
tion for an ideal agriculture and country life. We ought to make 
the best possible use of these splendid resources, not only for 
profit but for securing the highest type of rural life. If we aim 
to make "Bay State quality" a real asset in our farm production 
and in the development of rural communities that are here built 
up, we may soon take our stand proudly as a Commonwealth 
containing the best type of agriculture and country life in all the 
world. We are already doing much to justify the claim of high 
quality, but our desire should be nothing short of the highest. 
We need a great public ambition on behalf of Massachusetts 
agriculture and country life, a thoroughly progressive spirit on 
the part of the farmers, combined with a willingness to co-operate 
among themselves and with other people. 

Progressive Agencies. 
A catalogue of the efforts that are now being made to improve 
Massachusetts agriculture and country life shows that our people 
are not unmindful of their opportunities. 



32 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [Feb. 

The State Board of Agriculture has supervision of 32 agricultural 
fairs to which it pays bounties. It held during the past year 138 
farmers' institutes. It publishes an annual report, monthly crop 
reports, bulletins, nature leaflets and reports of other phases of 
its work. The work of the Dairy Bureau of the State Board of 
Agriculture consists in police work relative to the enforcement 
of dairy laws and educational work for the purpose of improving 
dairy products. The Board also is responsible for nursery in- 
spection and apiary inspection, employs an ornithologist, and en- 
courages agriculture directly by special exhibits, demonstrations 
and the distribution of bounties to incorporated poultry associa- 
tions. 

The State department of animal husbandry enforces laws 
relative to contagious diseases of domestic animals, and has 
also the power to secure proper hygienic conditions for such 
animals. 

The forest service of the State carries on an elaborate forest- 
fire protection, develops reforestation, and has charge of the 
suppression of the gypsy and brown-tail moths. It promotes 
the perpetuation, the extension and the proper management of 
the forest lands of the Commonwealth, both public and private. 
On request it gives owners of forest land aid and advice in the 
management thereof. 

The grange in Massachusetts has a membership of 32,000, with 
about 230 subordinate granges, in nearly as many towns of the 
State. It is growing and is reaching out to perform new tasks 
for the rural population. 

The fruit and corn shows that are held from time to time are 
demonstrating the possibilities of both of these industries in Mas- 
sachusetts, as well as illustrating better methods, and calling 
together people to observe what is actually being achieved. 

Various chambers of commerce in the cities of the State are in- 
teresting themselves in the agricultural problems of the Common- 
wealth. The Boston Chamber of Commerce, the most powerful 
commercial body in New England, has a committee on agriculture. 
The Springfield Board of Trade has been notably active in co- 
operating with agricultural agencies. The Worcester Board of 
Trade has taken an interest in agricultural propaganda in that 
county. 



1913.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 33 ' 

The New England railways have established an industrial 
bureau, which interests itself in the development of agriculture as 
well as in that of manufacturing. Both the steam and electric 
railways have lent their aid in various educational enterprises on 
behalf of agriculture. 

We have in Massachusetts a federation of churches organized 
on the broadest possible basis, officered by clear-visioned prophets 
of a better religious life. Special attention is being given to the 
country church, its needs and its possibilities of leadership in the 
building of a better rural Commonwealth. 

The Massachusetts State Library Association, although exist- 
ing in a State that has more public libraries than probably any 
other State in the Union, nevertheless has constructive plans for 
a wider distribution of books in the more sparsely settled com- 
munities. 

The State Board of Education is carrying on a comprehensive 
campaign on behalf of a thoroughgoing system of agricultural 
education of high school grade. 

Agricultural newspapers have a wide circulation in Massa- 
chusetts and are full of optimism with respect to the future of 
Massachusetts and country life. 

The Young Men's Christian Association has an active rural 
work. 

The Massachusetts Experiment Station is rendering a great 
service in various lines of control work in the testing of com- 
mercial fertilizers, of stock foods, and of dairy-testing apparatus. 
The experiment station also, as an organ of research, has been for 
years carrying on fundamental investigations with respect to the 
best use of Massachusetts soils and the best crops to grow on these 
soils. 

The Massachusetts Agricultural College has over 500 students 
of college grade, preparing for leadership in the various agricultural 
vocations. It also has each year nearly 300 students taking 
shorter courses in agriculture. 

The Extension Service of the Agricultural College is giving cor- 
respondence courses to several hundred regular readers, lecture 
courses and demonstrations in various parts of the State, local 
and State conferences for rural community development, exten- 
sion schools of agriculture, educational trains, educational ex- 



34 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [Feb. 

hibits and demonstrations at fairs, demonstration orchards, and 
it is organizing dairy and agricultural improvement associations, 
making agricultural surveys, organizing girls' and boys' agricul- 
tural clubs, and answering tens of thousands of letters each 
year. 

This mere cataloguing of enterprises carried on in this Common- 
wealth on behalf of agriculture and country life shows the enor- 
mous amount of time and energy and money which is being 
expended to-day, and being expended in faith of a harvest of 
better crops, of greater profits and of a sweeter, finer individual 
and community life in the rural towns of the State. 

Some Dangers in the Situation. 
All this activity is good. It indicates that Massachusetts has 
developed the machinery by which agricultural progress may be 
forwarded. But there are dangers in this very fact of multiplica- 
tion of effort. May I suggest two or three that seem to lie on the 
surface? 

1. The danger of duplication. The more aggressive an organiza- 
tion or institution, the greater the danger of doing work that 
is being attempted, or should be attempted, by some other or- 
ganization or agency. Thus money may be wasted. 

2. The danger of working at cross purposes. There is likelihood 
that different ends may be pursued by the different institutions, 
that various agencies may plow the same field at different angles, 
thus nullifying the work of one another. 

3. The danger of omission. Important things may be left un- 
done. Institutions as well as individuals are inclined to want to 
do the things that are suggested by what somebody else has done. 

In other words, the danger of overlapping of these various 
efforts may become serious and may work against the best de- 
velopment of our agriculture and country life. 

The Advantages of a Comprehensive Plan for advancing 
Agriculture and Country Life. 
The considerations just mentioned are in my judgment suffi- 
cient to raise the question whether we should not at once take 
steps to prevent duplication and overlapping. In other words, 
may we not, through the development of a comprehensive plan 



1913.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 35 

for the upbuilding of agriculture and country life in the whole 
Commonwealth, not only avoid overlapping of effort, but may 
we not also, by setting forth an ideal, thereby advance in mani- 
fold ways and by many years the realization of our watchword, 
"Bay State quality" ? Some of the advantages of such a com- 
prehensive plan seem to be fairly obvious, as, for example : — 

1. It would tend to prevent duplication of work and save un- 
necessary time and money. 

2. It would give a working ideal toward which every one could 
strive. 

3. It would assist in getting the large and important things 
done. 

4. It would aid in securing the co-operation of all the agencies, 
institutions and individuals that are interested in a better agri- 
culture and country life. 

An Ideal Program for Massachusetts Agriculture and 

Country Life. 

I am perfectly aware that an attempt to state an ideal program 
for such a large movement as the development of the agriculture 
and country life of a State might bring upon us the criticism of 
practical men as well as the criticism of the theorists. Practical 
men are sometimes inclined to scoff at a plan that seems to be 
visionary, and that involves a long period for its realization, even 
in part. The theorists will never agree on a program. Neverthe- 
less, I venture to suggest such a program, largely for the purpose 
of indicating the value of a definite plan of some sort as a basis 
for a comprehensive organization of agriculture and country life. 
We must look at the problem in the largest possible way. So far 
as practicable we must look at the problem as a unit, — the rural 
problem in Massachusetts. I suggest, therefore, the following 
ideal program : — 

In general, we need — 

1. To create enthusiasm for an enlarged Massachusetts agricul- 
ture; for an enriched Massachusetts country life. 

2. To encourage every needed association and institution wbich 
is working for rural betterment and agricultural advancement in 
Massachusetts, and to assist each to gain defmiteness, directness 
and efficiency for its particular task. 



36 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [Feb. 

3. To secure the co-operation of all the agricultural interests 
of Massachusetts on behalf of a concerted plan for a better agricul- 
ture and country life in every rural town of the State. 

4. To gain for this co-operative movement among agricultural 
agencies the active support of the commercial and industrial in- 
terests of Massachusetts. 

5. To develop adequate publicity for Massachusetts agricul- 
tural possibilities. 

6. To educate consumers as to Massachusetts-grown products 
of the soil, — their quality, value, and use; and in other ways to 
extend the market for Massachusetts agricultural products. 

In particular, we need — 

1. To secure an adequate inventory of Massachusetts agri- 
cultural resources. 

2. To devise and carry out educational campaigns for the most 
efficient agricultural practice and farm management, — for the best 
use of every acre of Massachusetts soil, while conserving soil re- 
sources. 

3. To improve the methods of marketing farm products, in 
order that all consumers may have a wider range of choice Mas- 
sachusetts-grown products at a fair price, and that the producers 
may have a reasonable profit for intelligent labor. 

4. To secure legislation that shall protect both producers and 
consumers, with justice to both, and that shall stimulate and en- 
courage the agricultural workers. 

5. To secure better highways and other means of communica- 
tion in the rural regions of Massachusetts. 

6. To improve the rural schools, and to build a comprehensive 
public system of agricultural education both for youth and for 
adults. 

7. To conserve and develop the beauty of rural Massachusetts. 

8. To increase the means of wholesome recreation for young 
and old in the rural communities of Massachusetts. 

9. To encourage the church and its allies to renewed labor and 
more efficient service in all rural towns. 

10. To encourage every wise endeavor for the preservation of 
the Massachusetts rural home, the lightening of its labors, and the 
widening of its influence in the community as well as upon the 
lives of its members. 



1913.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 37 

Some such general, or ideal, platform is needed in order to give 
scope and breadth to the attempt to organize the rural interests 
of the Commonwealth. But we also need — 

A Working Program of Large Rural Enterprises needing 
Immediate Attention. 

1. Secure the Best Use of Present Cultivated Areas. — This im- 
plies a series of well-developed educational campaigns for stimu- 
lating farmers to follow the most approved methods. An example 
at hand is the attempt to secure the general use of high-grade 
seed-corn. Our ambition should be to make every cultivated 
acre in Massachusetts yield the largest possible profit. 

2. Develop the Waste and Unimproved Areas. — There are tens 
of thousands of acres of waste lands, both along the coast and in 
river valleys, that are at present unavailable for agricultural 
purposes, but that when once drained might become the richest 
of our soils. The development of these lands must be preceded 
by a scientific study of their availability and a comprehensive 
plan for their drainage and use. Much of the land now 
listed as unimproved undoubtedly has uses if we could but find 
them. 

3. Help the Farmers to secure an Adequate Farm Labor Sup- 
ply. — This is one of the most difficult and perhaps the most im- 
portant of our agricultural problems in Massachusetts. Its im- 
portance, however, rather than its difficulty should be the warrant 
for making it the subject of careful study and for devising meth- 
ods for meeting the conditions that exist. 

4. Establish a Better System oj Rural Credit. — We are not yet 
sufficiently in possession of facts to be able to say just to what 
degree our Massachusetts farmers are lacking in facilities for 
securing both permanent and working capital. It is safe to say, 
however, that the time is soon coming, if it has not already arrived, 
when the need for better credit facilities will be a pressing need 
among our smaller landowners. 

5. Devise a More Efficient System of Marketing. — The dis- 
crepancy between the prices paid by the consumer of farm prod- 
ucts and the prices paid to the producer is a subject of constant 
comment and dissatisfaction to both parties concerned. We 
should attempt to organize, as soon as practicable, a system of 



38 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [Feb. 

distribution of agricultural products which will secure prices less 
fluctuating than now, and such that the farmer may receive a fair 
profit. In other words, the wastes and excessive costs of the 
present system of distribution must be minimized. 

6. Perfect the System of Agricultural Education. — A complete 
system of agricultural education will include the teaching of 
agriculture not only to college students, but also to boys and 
girls of high school age and to adults and young people who are 
not attending school. Massachusetts is well on the way toward 
a well-developed system. However, we must see to it that this 
system is based on sound principles, and that its parts work 
together in complete harmony. 

7. Get and keep the Right Kind of People on the Land. — It is 
difficult to influence in any marked way, by agitation or by legis- 
lation, or even by education, the currents of human migration as 
they flow from the country to the city, or from the city to the 
country, or from one nation to another. But it is clear that in 
New England we face a very serious question with respect to the 
maintenance of the quality of people living on and working the 
New England soil. It is often claimed that this quality has 
appreciably deteriorated in the last century. However that may 
be, we know perfectly well that in many parts of New England 
the land is being occupied by people of different ideals and 
standards of living than we have been accustomed to. The 
question is, can we insure a high quality of immigration to our 
lands, either from the city or from other countries or from the 
west; and once these people are on the land can we insure a 
scheme of education that shall rapidly bring them into sympathy 
with, and understanding of, our best American life? Certainly 
we should not decline to exercise every effort to maintain the sort 
of rural population that we desire. 

Complete Organization of Agriculture and Country Life. 
It is my firm conviction that we need a complete organization 
of agriculture and country life in order to bring about such de- 
sirable advancements as have been described. We must secure 
a measurable degree of co-operation among all the factors that 
make for better conditions. It is perfectly true that we can work 
in piecemeal fashion, but that is not the spirit of the age and it is 



1913.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 39 

not the best method. Neither the State nor any group of in- 
dividuals nor any organization can dictate the methods of prog- 
ress or the way in which co-operation may be secured. But we 
can secure such an organization of all the agricultural and country 
life interests in the Commonwealth that they shall work together 
intelligently and sympathetically on behalf of the larger interests 
of our rural people, and thus on behalf of the welfare of the entire 
Commonwealth. 

The Method of Organization. 
In considering a. method by which this large and complete or- 
ganization of agriculture and rural life interests in Massachusetts 
may be achieved, the main reliance must be placed on the idea 
of federation of interests. We do not need a new organization. 
We simply need a getting together of existing organizations and 
agencies. In other words, the federal, or representative, idea is 
the key to the situation. 

A Plea for a Massachusetts Federation for Rural 

Progress. 

Therefore I would recommend that the trustees authorize a 
call, as soon as such a step seems wise — perhaps next autumn — 
to the representatives of all the various interests that have been 
catalogued, and such others as are interested, for the purpose of 
discovering whether the time is not ripe for a definite federation 
of these interests on behalf of an enthusiastic, clear-cut, well- 
planned, persistent effort to bring Massachusetts agriculture and 
country life to its highest possible development. This movement 
is already under way in some of the towns of the State and, in- 
deed, in the State as a whole, but it needs organizing. 

We cannot of course state the exact form that such a move- 
ment may take. A number of towns in the State have already 
appointed town committees or developed town federations for 
rural improvement. Clearly, we must have each town seeking 
to make the best use of its resources before we can have the State 
as a whole making the best use of its resources. The heart of the 
movement is the attempt of each town to study its own resources 
and its needs, and to map out a plan for bettering conditions in 
the town. It has already been suggested that these town rural 



40 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [Feb. 

life "committees" (or "councils" or "federations") co-operate 
in a county organization of a similar type; and, finally, that 
representatives of these county organizations unite with the 
representatives of the various State-wide organizations and 
agencies in a Massachusetts federation for rural progress. 

The Relation of the State to the Campaign for Rural 

Progress. 
It is obvious, also, that the State of Massachusetts itself, not 
only through legislation but through various institutions and 
agencies supported out of the State treasury, can and must con- 
tinue to render a great service in this renewed effort to secure the 
best quality of agriculture and country life for the Common- 
wealth. This is one of the most significant aspects of our attempt 
to bring 'about a thorough organization of Massachusetts agri- 
culture and country life. The State cannot achieve all that needs 
to be done working apart from private individuals and voluntary 
organizations, but it can and should play a vital part in the gen- 
eral plan. 

What the State should do. 

The State should — 

1. Gather facts. 

2. Protect. 

3. Stimulate. 

4. Develop. 

5. Educate. 

6. Provide a clearing-house for agricultural and rural life in- 
terests. 

1. The State should gather Facts. — We need to know our agri- 
cultural resources and possibilities. We need to know existing 
agricultural methods. We need to know the tendencies and needs 
of the markets both at home and abroad. 

There are two classes of facts that need gathering. The first 
class comprises a census of those facts that have a bearing upon 
the agricultural business and method. They should be gathered 
every year. They have to do with production, with prices, with 
miscellaneous agricultural statistics. The other class may be 
designated more completely by the word "investigation." There 
must be a constant study of fundamental problems of the soil and 



1913.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 41 

of plant and animal growth, as well as a study of those economic 
and social conditions that have so much influence in the farmer's 
work and life. 

2. The State should protect. — It should protect the farmers 
against diseases and pests, against fraud and injustice. It should 
protect the better and honest farmers against the inferior and 
dishonest farmers. This protection will be secured through proper 
legislation enforced by appropriate executive boards or com- 
missions. 

3. The State should stimulate. — It should to some degree offer 
prizes. It should have general supervision of the agricultural- 
fair system. It should advertise the agricultural advantages of 
the State to its own people, to the people of other parts of the 
land, and to the people of those foreign countries that are able 
tofcontribute a stalwart and acceptable rural population to our 
Massachusetts farms. 

4. The State should develop. — Without question full sweep 
should be given to individual initiative. At the same time, there 
are problems to solve so complicated, so difficult, so far-reaching 
that it will be almost impossible to work them out unless the 
State in some way lends direct aid. For example, to recur to a 
matter already mentioned, we have in Massachusetts tens of 
thousands of acres of waste land. Some of these lands are near 
tidewater. They can be drained only under some large scheme. 
Other thousands of acres of these lands are in the valleys and 
along streams, perhaps overflowed by waters that were once useful 
for manufacturing purposes, but that are no longer useful. Other 
thousands of acres are rough land; some of them available only 
for forestry purposes, but a very large proportion of them capable 
of development for prosperous sheep-growing or orcharding. It 
is only through some form of State aid and leadership that these 
waste lands can be developed. They are an unworked asset. 
They ought to be developed as soon as possible, on some com- 
prehensive plan. They should, first of all, be surveyed and their 
possibilities understood. 

So, also, in the development of adequate credit facilities and 
market facilities, the State should render necessary assistance, 
even though the actual, business organization is co-operative 
among individuals or organizations. 



42 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [Feb. 

The State can continue to assist prospective purchasers of farms 
in locating those farms and in furnishing information concerning 
the best uses to which those farms can be put. 

The State can assist in securing an adequate labor supply by 
acting as a clearing-house for labor engagements and, what is 
more important, by securing from foreign countries or from the 
cities an adequate number of skilled laborers. The same thing 
is true to a large degree in the development of an adequate system 
of marketing of farm products. 

If all Massachusetts acres are to be tilled to their full capacity, 
it means a larger rural population. There is a tide setting in 
from the city toward the country, and undoubtedly during the 
next ten years a great many people will come out from the cities 
to take farm lands and work them permanently. There is un- 
doubtedly a considerable number of farmers in the middle west — 
many of them of New England descent — who for one reason or 
another would like to get back to New England. Some of them 
like the New England life; some wish to engage in certain spe- 
cialties that can be developed in the east better than in the west; 
some would like to sell their relatively high-priced lands and buy 
the cheaper lands of New England. The State, through an or- 
ganized effort, could encourage these people to locate advanta- 
geously in Massachusetts. It is also a matter of concern as to the 
type of immigrant that comes from foreign shores to settle our 
lands, whether he has the capacity to develop in modern agri- 
culture, and whether he will assimilate with our American in- 
stitutions. The State should see to it that efforts are made to 
get the right sort of people on the land. 

5. The State should educate for Agriculture. — It should have a 
comprehensive system of investigation, of teaching and of ex- 
tension service at the agricultural college. It should have a well- 
developed system of agricultural departments in our high schools 
and in the special agricultural high schools. So far as consistent 
with good educational principles, agriculture should be brought 
to the attention of pupils in the upper grades of the public schools. 

6. To some degree, at least, the State should provide a clearing- 
house for the organization of agriculture and country life. In other 
words, the State itself should co-operate most intimately and cor- 
dially with a State federation for rural progress in the development 
of a comprehensive campaign for a better agriculture and rural life. 



1913.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 43 



The Principles under which the State should make its 
Contribution to the Organization of Agriculture and 
Country Life. 

If the State is to participate, as it should, in this effort to bring 
agriculture and country life in Massachusetts to its highest levels, 
there are a few fundamental principles that must be invoked. 

1. The Principle of Local Initiative. — There should be a 
maximum of effort on the part of individuals and voluntary or- 
ganizations. It is not the business of the State to do either for 
individuals or for towns what they can do for themselves. The 
State, therefore, should encourage individual and community 
initiative and discourage individual and community dependence 
upon outside agencies. 

2. The Principle of Co-operation. — This principle is recognized 
in all our business and social life and cannot be disregarded how- 
ever much we may cherish the old individualism of the past. As 
a matter of fact, there is little danger that this individualism, in 
New England at least, is likely to be crowded out. We need, 
rather, to encourage the spirit of working together. This prin- 
ciple of co-operation also means an institutional division of labor, 
that is, making sure that the different organizations and agencies 
do their own particular kinds of work, and then that all co-operate 
for the one large, common end. 

3. The Principle of Federation. — It is desirable to centralize 
our efforts, but not to centralize authority or power. Consequently, 
the federal principle forms the best method for securing co- 
operation of individuals and institutions. 

The Main Agencies of State Aid for Agriculture. 

There are two main agencies by which the State can develop 
its proper relationship to the organization of agriculture and 
country life. The first is the State Board of Agriculture; the 
second is the Agricultural College. This statement is not meant 
to convey the idea that these are the only agencies by which the 
State can develop its activities on behalf of agriculture and country 
life, but in these two center the main lines of effort in which 
the State should participate. They are characteristic, specialized 
agencies of the State. Among those miscellaneous agencies, 



44 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [Feb. 

whose function is not, however, specifically rural, are the State 
Board of Education, the State Board of Health, the Railway 
Commission, the Highway Commission, etc. All of these boards 
have functions that bring them into close touch with the de- 
velopment of a better country life. But their prime function is 
connected with the people as a whole and not with the rural 
problem specifically. They must be considered in any attempt 
to relate the State to a campaign for rural progress. 

It would be unwise to prolong this discussion by treating ex- 
haustively all the respective functions of these two main agencies, 
but it is absolutely necessary to outline in a terse way the special 
tasks that I believe should be developed by them. It must be 
remembered that these tasks will, in some degree, overlap, and that 
the co-operative spirit and method must be constantly used as 
the work is developed. 

The Function of the Boaed of Agriculture. 
The function of a well-organized board of agriculture in an 
American State is not primarily educational but administrative. 
Among the various types of work which should be fostered and 
controlled by such a board are the following: — 

1. The gathering of current statistical facts, especially con- 
cerning business tendencies and needs. 

2. The administration of laws designed to protect the farmers. 

3. The administration of those enterprises designed to stim- 
ulate and foster agriculture. 

4. The administration of those efforts that have to do with the 
development of agriculture, in so far as the State wishes to par- 
ticipate in such efforts. 

In these matters the board of agriculture should take the 
initiative. The college may help at many points. 

The Function of the Agricultural College. 

The American agricultural college has as its mission education 
and not administration. This education divides itself very natu- 
rally into three main lines of effort. 

1. Investigation, which includes not only the study of the laws 
of nature with respect to the soil and the growth of plants and 



1913.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 45 

animals, but also an investigation of actual conditions — physi- 
cal, economic, social — under which farmers work and live. 

2. The education of men and women who shall be rural-prob- 
lem solvers. This is accomplished through regular and special 
courses offered at the institution. 

3. The educational function also embraces the extension serv- 
ice, which attempts to reach those who cannot come to the 
college, with the best of information concerning all phases of the 
rural problem. 

The college, also through its extension service, should serve as 
a clearing-house for the general movement to organize agriculture 
and country life in the Commonwealth. It should co-operate 
heartily with the federation for rural progress, and should be in 
close touch with the varied efforts of the board of agriculture. 

In all these matters the college should take the initiative, al- 
though at many points the board of agriculture may assist. 

The Function of Local Government. 
In all this work there might well be a larger participation of 
local government, both of counties and towns, on behalf of a better 
agriculture and country life. We do not yet know by what means 
this larger participation may be developed, but I believe that we 
must rely more fully than we have ever done before on the local 
civic groups for practical assistance in working out our country 
life problems. 

The Next Step. 
It is obvious that the main ideas here advanced can be realized 
only by some definite co-operative action on the part of the in- 
stitutions and organizations most intimately connected with the 
development of Massachusetts agriculture and country life. It 
is of first importance to determine the scope of State aid to agri- 
culture, the function of the board of agriculture, of the Agricultural 
College, and of other State agencies in this scheme of State aid, 
and the relationship of these one to another and to all of the 
voluntary organizations and enterprises interested. 



46 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [Feb. 



A Commission on Agricultural Education and Organiza- 
tion. 

I therefore believe the time has come for the organization of 
a commission to study and report on the question of the relation- 
ship of the State to rural development in Massachusetts. I 
suggest a commission of seven appointed as follows: one by the 
State Board of Agriculture; one by the executive committee of 
the State grange; one by the Board of Trustees of the Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural College; one by the State Board of Educa- 
tion; and three by the Governor. One of those appointed by the 
Governor should be a practical farmer, and one should be an 
attorney of recognized standing. 

The appointment should be for a period ending on the pres- 
entation of the report of the commission at a date not later than 
Jan. 1, 1915. 

The members of the commission should serve without pay, 
but necessary expenses should be paid, and authority should be 
granted, under the approval of the Governor and Council, to 
travel in other States and, if necessary, to send member or agent 
delegate to Europe for the purpose of learning what is being 
done in other States and countries. The commission should be 
authorized to employ a secretary at a salary not to exceed $150 a 
month, should be given sufficient clerical help and should be 
required to present a report not later than Jan. 1, 1915. There 
should be an appropriation ample to carry on the work of the 
commission. 

The special duties of the commission should be as follows : — 

1. To collect all the laws of the Commonwealth bearing on 
agriculture and country life, and to recommend a code or group 
of acts designed to cover the present needs of the Commonwealth, 
in so far as legislation may be considered effective and desirable 
in the proper control and development of the agricultural in- 
dustries and rural affairs in the State. 

2. To report on the best methods of aiding agriculture, and the 
best form of organization for such State boards and institutions 
as are needed. 

3. To present a statement relative to the best methods of co- 
ordinating the activities of the various agencies in the Common- 



1913.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 47 

wealth, both public and private, which are designed to benefit 
agriculture and country life, and the relation of the Common- 
wealth thereto. 

If this suggestion for a commission appointed by the Legislature 
seems too formidable, or is considered impracticable at the present 
time, it is possible that progress could be made if some one of the 
institutions interested should take the initiative in calling to- 
gether a voluntary conference to be made up of a representative 
or representatives of several of the agencies interested, for the 
purpose of discussing the questions raised in this report. 1 

Respectfully submitted, 

KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD, 

President. 

1 The above report was accepted by the trustees of the college, and a vote passed to the effect 
that the trustees favor the idea of a conference of representatives of State and other agencies 
interested in agriculture and country life, and that they recommend that each of the following 
organizations appoint a representative or representatives to such a conference for the purpose 
of conferring on the suggestions contained in the report: The State Board of Agriculture, The 
State Board of Education, The Massachusetts State Grange, The Massachusetts Society for the 
Promotion of Agriculture, The Boston Chamber of Commerce, The Massachusetts Agricultural 
College. 

At the annual meeting of the State Board of Agriculture, held Jan. 7 and 8, 1913, it was voted 
to join in the suggestion made in the above report, and the secretary of the board of agriculture 
was authorized to invite the above-named organizations to elect representatives to the con- 
ference. 



48 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



[Feb. 



Statistics of the College. 



Table I. — Attendance. 



Registration 
Nov. 30, 1911. 



Registration 
Nov. 30, 1912. 



Senior class, 

Junior class, 

Sophomore class 

Freshman class, 

Graduate students, ... 
Unclassified students, . 

Total doing work of college grade, 

Short courses: — 
Winter school, . . . . 
Poultry course, .... 
Apple-packing school, ... 
Beekeepers' course, 
Summer school, .... 

Total 



85 
97 
127 
168 

477 

15 
29 



521 



113 

74 



16 
153 



356 

877 



91 

102 
125 
184 

502 

22 
31 



555 



131 



261 
816 



Table II. — Legislative Budget, 1912. 



Items. 



Amount 
asked. 



Amount 
granted. 



1. Special appropriations: — 

Agricultural laboratory and equipment, 
Student dormitory, .... 
Addition to French Hall, . 
Addition to Draper Hall, . 
Dwelling for registrar, 
Tenement house for farm help, . 

Sewers, 

Department equipment, 

Repairs and minor improvements, 

General improvements, 



2. Increase in current annual appropriations: 
Administration, ..... 
Maintenance and equipment, 
Investigation, ..... 
Instruction, . . . 

Short courses and extension, 

Previous appropriation, 

Total 



$200,000 00 
25,000 00 
25,000 00 
25,000 00 
8,000 00 
6,000 00 
10,000 00 
31,525 00 
20,760 00 
35,135 00 



$386,420 00 



$5,000 00 
37,000 00 
14,000 00 
23,000 00 
30,000 00 



$109,000 00 
173,500 00 



$282,500 00 



$25,000 00 



10,000 00 
20,000 00 
15,000 00 
10,000 00 



$80,000 00 



$5,000 00 
22,000 00 
4,500 00 
15,000 00 
30,000 00 



$76,500 00 
173,500 00 



$250,000 00 



1913.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 49 

Table III. — Statistics of the Extension Service for 1912. 
Extension Service conducted at the College. 

Farmers' week, 1,040 

Polish farmers' day, 57 

Conference for rural community leaders, ' 184 

Correspondence courses: — 

Present enrollment, .............. 578 

Courses completed or work dropped during year, . 175 

Number of people reached through short courses and correspondence courses, . . 2,034 

Extension Service conducted away from the College. 

Lectures: 1 — 

Number given in 1912, 591 

Approximate attendance 27,469 

Fairs: — 
No exhibits made, but members of the faculty acted as judges and gave lectures at 16 
fairs throughout the State. No attendance was taken. 

Demonstration orchards: — 

Requests on file, ' . 34 

New orchards planted, 2 

Renovation plots 1 

Boys' and girls' corn and potato clubs: — 

Number of clubs 127 

Number enrolled 13,462 

Massachusetts Agricultural College Agricultural Improvement Association: — 

Membership, . . 137 

Dairy Improvement Association: — 

Number organized 3 

Number of members, 55 

Extension schools: — 

Requests for schools 16 

Schools given 5 

Membership 351 

Enrollment, 500 

Judging contests 13 

Enrollment, Ill 

Traveling libraries: — 

Public libraries receiving books, ........... 36 

High schools, .■ 1 

Volumes sent out, 629 

Bulletins, pamphlets, etc., 252 

Average size of shipment, 24 

Farm visits: — 

Visits made, _. 66 

Student extension work: — 

Evening schools held, 4 

Teachers 9 

Average attendance each week, . 80 

Mailing list: — 

Facts for farmers, 1,553 

Short courses, 3,764 

Total number of people reached, 49,231 

These numbers do not include the attendance of the various meetings held at the college by 
organizations throughout the State. 



Table IV. — Public Speakers for the Year. 

A. Speakers at Sunday Chapel for Year ending Nov. SO, 1912. 
1911. 

Dec. 10. — Dr. Samuel A. Eliot, Boston. 

1912. 

Jan. 7. — Mr. Robert E. Speer, New York City. 

Jan. 14. — Rev. J. S. Lyon, Holyoke. 

Jan. 21. — Mr. Henry Bond, Brattleboro, Vt. 

1 This is not accurate, as many lectures are not reported. 



50 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [Feb. 

1912. 

Jan. 28. — Rev. F. Boyd Edwards, Orange, N. J. 

Feb. 11. — Dr. Albert P. Fitch, Cambridge. 

Feb. 18. — Dr. Herbert J. White, Hartford, Conn. 

Feb. 25. — Mr. W. R. Moody, Northfield. 

Mar. 3. — Rev. J. W. Campbell, Newtonville. 

Mar. 10. — Rev. Lee W. Beattie, New York City. 

Mar. 17. — Mr. Ray Stannard Baker, Amherst. 

Mar. 24. — Mr. Herbert S. Carruth, Amherst, 

Apr. 14. — Rev. Robert A. Ashworth, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Apr. 21. — Col. E. W. Halford, New York City. 

May 5. — Mr. Jacob Riis, New York City. 

Nov. 3. — Rev. Clarence F. Swift, Fall River. 

Nov. 10. — Bishop Thomas F. Davies, Springfield. 

Nov. 17. — Mr. Alfred H. Evans, Northampton. 

Nov. 24. — Rev. Paul Van Dyke, Princeton, N. J. 

B. Speakers at Wednesday Assemblies for Year ending Nov. SO, 1912. 
1911. 
Dec. 13. — Mr. John Nolen, Cambridge. 

1912. 

Jan. 10. — Prof. William D. Hurd, Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Jan. 17. — Dr. J. H. McCurdy, Springfield. 

Jan. 24. — Rev. George M. Rowland, Auburndale. 

Feb. 7. — President Kenyon L. Butterfield, Massachusetts Agricultural 
College. 

Feb. 14. — Miss Ida M. Tarbell, New York City. 

Feb. 21. — Mr. Henry Sterling, Boston. 

Feb. 28. — Mr. W. M. Danner, Boston. 

Mar. 13. — Pres. Harry A. Garfield, Williams College. 

Mar. 20. — Mr. J. W. Pincus, New York City. 

Mar. 27. — Mr. William Jessup Sholar, Boston. 

Apr. 10. — Hon. Michael J. Murray, Boston. 

Apr. 17. — Prof. Edgar L. Ashley, Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Apr. 24. — Pres. Frederick W. Hamilton, Tufts College. 

May 1. — Mr. J. G. Phelps Stokes, New York City. 

May 8. — Pres. Kenyon L. Butterfield, Massachusetts Agricultural 
College. 

May 15. — Rev. A. Z. Conrad, Boston. 

June 5. — Pres. Kenyon L. Butterfield, Massachusetts Agricultural 
College. 

Sept. 18. — Pres. Kenyon L. Butterfield, Massachusetts Agricultural 
College. 

Sept. 25. — Hon. James Logan, Worcester. 

Oct. 9. — Associate Dean Edward M. Lewis, Massachusetts Agricul- 
tural College. 



1913. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 



51 



1912. 

Oct. 23. — Prof. Charles E. Marshall, Massachusetts Agricultural Col- 
lege. 
Nov. 6. — Hon. James J. Storrow, Boston. 

Nov. 13. — Prof. Robert J. Sprague, Massachusetts Agricultural College. 
Nov. 20. — Mr. William Chauncy Langdon, New York City. 



Table V. — Statistics of Freshmen entering Massachusetts Agricultural 
College, September, 1912. 

A. Home Addresses of Students (classified by Towns and Cities). 



Acushnet, . 
Adams, 
Amherst, . 
Apaupo, N. J., 
Arlington, . 
Ashfield, . 
Auburndale, 
Beverly, 
Boston, 
Bridgewater, 
Brockton, . 
Brookline, . 
Brooklyn, N. Y 
Canton, 

Centreville, R. 1 
Clinton, 
Concord, . 
Cranford, N. J., 
Dalton, 
Dal ton, Pa., 
Dedham, . 
Deerfield, . 
Dorchester, 
Doylstown, Pa. 
East Dover, Vt 
Easthampton, 
Exeter, N. H., 
Fall River,. 
Fitchburg, 
Flemington, N. 
Florida, N. Y., 
Forest Hills, 
Foxcroft, Me., 
Framingham, 
Georgetown, 
Great Barrington, 
Groton, 
Groveland, 
Hadley, 
Harvard, . 
Haverhill, . 
Hingham, . 



J-, 



Hopedale, . 

Jamaica Plain, . 

Jefferson, . 

Kingston, . 

Lawrence, . 

Leominster, 

Longmeadow, . 

Lowell, 

Lynn, 

Maiden, 

Manchester, 

Mansfield, . 

Marlborough, 

Mattapan, . 

Melrose, 

Melrose Highlands, 

Mendon, 

Merrick, 

Merrimac, . 

Milford, 

Millbury, . 

Millers Falls, 

Millis, 

Montague, . 

Mount Vernon, N. Y 

Natick, 

Newbury, Vt., . 

Newtown, Conn., 

North Abington, 

North Adams, . 

North Amherst, 

Northampton, . 

Northborough, . 

North Brookfield, 

Northfield,. 

North Middleborough 

Orange, 

Pawtucket, R. I., 

Philadelphia, Pa., 

Phoenix Mills, N. Y., 

Pittsfield, . 

Plymouth, 



Quincy, 

Rockville, . 

Roslindale, 

Roxbury, . 

Roxbury Station, Conn. 

Royalston, 

Rowe, 

Saxonville, 

Sayville, L. I., N. Y., 

Seymour, Conn., 

Shelburne Falls, 

Somerset, . 

Somerville, 

Southborough, . 

South Duxbury, 

South Hadley, . 

South Hadley Falls, 

South Harwich, 

South Natick, . 

South Weymouth, 

Springfield, 

Stockbridge, 

Stoughton, 

Sunderland, 

Taunton, . 

Ticonderoga, N. Y., 

Turners Falls, 

Vineyard Haven, 

Waitsfield, Vt., 

Waltham, . 

Warren, 

Westford, . 

Westminster, 

West Springfield, 

Williamsburg, 

Wilton, Conn., 

Windsor, Conn., 

Winter Hill, 

Winthrop, . 

Worcester, . 



B. Home Addresses (classified by States). 





Number. 


Per Cent. 




Number. 


Per Cent. 


Connecticut, 
Maine, 

Massachusetts, 
New Hampshire, 
New Jersey, 
New York, . 


5 
1 
158 
1 
3 
8 


2.72 

.54 

85.87 

.54 

1.63 

4.35 


Pennsylvania, 
Rhode Island, 
Vermont, 


3 
2 
3 


1.63 
1.09 
1.63 


184 


100.00 



52 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



[Feb. 





C. 


Home Addresses (classified by Countiet 


of Massachusetts) . 






Number. 


Per Cent. 




Number. 


Per Cent. 


Barnstable, 

Berkshire, 

Bristol, 

Dukes, 

Essex, . 

Franklin, 

Hampden, 

Hampshire, 








1 
9 
5 
1 
16 
14 
6 
14 


.63 
5.70 
3.16 

.63 
10.13 
8.86 
3.80 
8.86 


Middlesex, 

Nantucket, 

Norfolk, 

Plymouth, 

Suffolk, 

Worcester, 








34 

9 
10 
16 
23 


21.52 

5.70 

6.33 

10.13 

14.55 










158 


100.00 



D. Nativity of Parents. 



Per Cent. 




Neither parent foreign born, 
Both parents foreign born, 
Father (only) foreign born, 
Mother (only) foreign born, 





E. 


Education of Father. 








Number. 


Per Cent. 




83 
56 
19 
20 
6 


45.11 




30.43 




10.33 




10.87 
3.26 












184 


100.00 



F. Religious Census. 









Membership. 


Preference. 


Tot 


AIM. 




Number. 


Per Cent. 


Number. 


Per Cent. 


Number. 


Per Cent. 


Baptist, .... 


14 


7.61 


4 


2.17 


18 


9.78 


Catholic, . 






19 


10.33 


- 


- 


19 


10.33 


Congregational, 






41 


22.28 


28 


15.22 


69 


37.50 


Episcopal, 






10 


5.44 


7 


3.80 


17 


9.24 


Hebrew, . 






2 


1.08 


6 


3.26 


8 


4.34 


Methodist, 






10 


5.44 


4 


2.17 


14 


7.61 


Presbyterian, . 






4 


2.17 


- 


- 


4 


2.17 


Unitarian, 






11 


5.98 


5 


2.72 


16 


8.70 


Universalist, . 






1 


.54 


9 


4.90 


10 


5.44 


Miscellaneous, 






3 


1.63 


- 


- 


3 


1.63 


No statistics, . 






6 


3.26 


- 


- 


6 


3.26 








121 


65.76 


63 


34.24 


184 


100.00 



1913.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 



53 



G. Occupation of Fathers. 



Agriculture and horticulture (practical), 
Artisans, ...... 

Business, ...... 

Deceased or no statistics, . 
Miscellaneous, ..... 

Professional, ..... 

Retired, 



Number. 



184 



Per Cent. 



48 


26.09 


42 


22.82 


51 


27.72 


10 


5.44 


14 


7.61 


17 


9.24 


2 


1.08 



100.00 



H. Intended Vocations of Students. 



Per Cent. 




Agriculture or horticulture (practical), 
Agriculture or horticulture (professional), 

Business, 

Miscellaneous 

Professions, . . 

Undecided or no statistics, 



99.98 



J. Farm Experience. 



Per Cent. 




Brought up on a farm 

Not brought up on a farm and having had no, or practically 
no, farm experience 

Not brought up on a farm, but having had some farm experi- 
ence, 



99.99 



/. Miscellaneous Statistics. 

Average age, 19.22 years. 

Number applying for student labor, 110 (59.23 per cent.) 

Table VI. — Entrance Statistics of Freshman Class. 

Number of applications, 288 

Admitted ' 204 

Matriculated, 184 

Failed to report, . 20 

Total 204 

Rejected 84 

Total 288 

Admitted on certificate, 128 

Admitted on examination, ; . 14 

Admitted on certificate and examination, .......... 42 

184 

Admitted without condition, . 113 

Admitted with condition 71 

184 



54 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



[Feb. 



Bepokt of the Treasurer 

For the Fiscal Year ending Nov. 30, 1912. 



Balance Sheet. 





Db. 


Cr. 


1911. 
Dec. 1. To cash on hand, 

1912. 

Nov. 30. To special appropriation receipts, State Treasurer, . 

By special appropriation disbursements, .... 

From State Treasurer §14,250 00 

From United States Treasurer, . . 30,000 00 
From other sources and transfers, . 23,393 34 

By experiment station disbursements, .... 

To current account receipts, 

From United States Treasurer, Morrill 

fund, $16,666 66 

From United States Treasurer, Nelson 

fund, 16,666 67 

From State Treasurer endowment 

fund, 10,613 32 

From State Treasurer, maintenance, . 58,000 00 
From State Treasurer, administration, 25,000 00 
From State Treasurer, instruction, . 60,000 00 
From State Treasurer, extension de- 
partment, 20,000 00 

From other sources and transfers, . 59,246 87 

By current account disbursements, ..... 

To student trust funds receipts, 

By student trust funds disbursements, .... 
By cash on hand, 


$8,229 09 
15,439 54 

149,782 44 

67,643 34 

266,193 52 
66,805 76 


$143,655 88 
68,649 41 

275,661 69 

62,855 80 

6,852 44 

16,418 47 


• 


$574,093 69 


$574,093 69 



Statement of the First National Bank of Amherst with the 
Massachusetts Agricultural College, 





Dr. 


Cr. 


1911. 

1912. 

Interest, 

Disbursements as per warrants, 

Balance on hand, 


$39,976 40" 

551,561 75 
1,088 69 


$547,301 97 
45,324 87» 




$592,626 84 


$592,626 84 



i These amounts are greater Dec. 1, 1911, by $24,536.86, and Nov. 30, 1911, $28,791.20, on 
account of outstanding checks. 



1913.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 



55 



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56 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



[Feb. 



Current Accounts. 
Disbursements and Receipts. 



Accounts. 



Disburse- 
ments from 
Dec. 1, 1911, 
to Nov. 30, 
1912. 



Receipts 

from 

Dec. 1, 1911, 

to Nov. 30, 

1912. 



Apportion- 
ment for 
Year ending 
Nov. 30, 
1911. 



Balance 

to 
Credit. 



Administration, . 

Agricultural economics, 

Agricultural education, 

Agronomy, . 

Animal husbandry, . 

Botanical, . 

Chemical, . 

Dairying, . 

Dean's office, . ' . 

Economics and sociology, 

Entomology, 

Farm, .... 

Farm administration, 

Floriculture, 

Forestry, 

General agriculture, . 

General horticulture, . 

General maintenance, 

Graduate school, 

Grounds, 

History and government, 

Landscape gardening, 

Language and literature, 

Library, . _ . 

Market gardening, 

Mathematics, 

Military, 

Physics, 

Physical education, 

Pomology, . 

Poultry husbandry, 

President's office, 

Registrar's office, 

Rural sociology, . 

Salaries, 

Treasurer's office, 

Veterinary department, 

Zoology, 

State Treasurer: — 

Endowment fund, 

Maintenance, 

Scholarship, . 

Instruction, . 
United States Treasurer: — 

Morrill fund, 

Nelson fund, 



Balance beginning fiscal year Dec. 1, 

1911, 

Balance on hand Nov. 30, 1912, 



$6,177 60 

102 11 

1,266 84 

206 40 

264 01 

1,558 75 

3,958 87 

205 80 

353 02 

48 35 

1,359 83 

26,207 33 

212 66 

3,887 99 

184 57 

537 28 

2,791 01 

63,093 90 

1 50 

3,114 11 

19 93 

444 55 

544 37 

6,591 12 

4,452 21 

209 81 

1,547 43 

227 94 

570 99 
3,502 47 
3,214 79 

659 08 

383 00 

39 69 

113,525 51 

891 20 

1,464 03 

571 58 



$254,391 63 
19,288 62 



$273,680 25 



$24 72 

122 62 

5 20 

3 89 

970 63 

2,648 23 

20 

11 00 

263 99 

19,919 02 

11 38 

2,869 75 

51 63 

599 54 

22,094 07 

85 

473 03 

590 40 
1,851 94 



121 50 

1,233 52 

1,235 41 

2 18 



19 35 
329 69 

10,613 32 
58,000 00 
25,000 00 
60,000 00 

16,666 66 
16,666 67 



$7,240 00 
125 00 

1,100 00 
200 00 
300 00 
750 00 

1,400 00 
200 00 
300 00 
100 00 

1,200 00 

3,000 00 
200 00 

1,300 00 
400 00 
200 00 

2,000 00 
46,500 00 

3,500 00 

100 00 

250 00 

750 00 

6,000 00 

2,400 00 

350 00 

1,550 00 

525 00 

500 00 

2,000 00 

2,000 00 

1,000 00 

400 00 

100 00 

110,593 34 

800 00 

1,400 00 

150 00 



$242,407 87 
31,272 38 » 



$200,883 34 



$273,680 25 



$200,883 34 



$1,087 12 

22 89 

-44 22 

—1 20 

39 88 

161 88 

89 36 

—5 60 

—42 02 

51 65 

104 16 

—3,288 31 

—1 28 

281 76 

215 43 

—285 65 

—191 47 

5,500 17 

2,366 13 

386 74 

80 07 

278 48 

205 63 

— 72 

—200 27 

140 19 

2 57 

297 06 

50 51 

—268 95 

20 62 

343 10 

17 60 

60 31 

—2,932 17 

—84 32 

-44 68 

—91 89 



$11,803 31 
—7,482 75 



$4,320 56 



1 This balance is increased by 
report of that department. 



5,411.94 on account of extension service deficit, shown in 



1913.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 



57 



Summary. 





Disbursements. 


Receipts. 


Cash on hand Dec. 1, 1911,i 

Institution receipts Nov. 30, 1912 

State Treasurer's receipts Nov. 30, 1912, .... 

United States Treasurer's receipts Nov. 30, 1912, 

Total disbursements 


$254,391 63 


$31,236 57 
55,461 22 

153,613 32 
33,333 33 


Bills receivable Dec. 1, 1911, deducted, .... 


$254,391 63 
3,059 45 


$273,644 44 
2,265 82 


Bills receivable Nov. 30, 1912 

Bills payable Nov. 30, 1912, 


$251,332 18 

2,964 94 
21,140 01 


$271,378 62 
4,058 51 




$275,437 13 


$275,437 13 



1 This amount is greater by $5,411.94 than previous report on account of taking out deficit 
of the extension service. See the extension service report. 



Comparative Disbursements and Receipts for 1911-12. 













Disbursements . 


Receipts. 


Accounts. 












1911. 


1912. 


1911. 


1912. 


Administration, .... 


$6,233 96 


$6,177 60 


$2 36 


$24 72 


Agricultural economics, 








91 28 


102 11 


- 


- 


Agricultural education, 








5,705 78 


1,266 84 


17 67 


122 52 


Agricultural division, 








22,788 40 


26,207 33 


19,052 37 


19,919 02 


Agronomy, 








- 


206 40 


- 


5 20 


Animal husbandry, . 








- 


264 01 


- 


3 89 


Botanical, . 








1,442 56 


1,558 75 


769 55 


970 63 


Chemical, . 








3,520 50 


3,958 87 


2,328 43 


2,648 23 


Dairying, . 








- 


205 80 


- 


20 


Dean's office, 








202 45 


353 02 


- 


11 00 


Economics and sociology, 








- 


48 35 


- 




Entomology, 








1,084 82 


1,359 83 


275 79 


263 99 


Extension service, 








20,811 41 


- 


2,864 87 


- 


Farm administration, 








- 


212 66 


- 


11 38 


Floriculture, 








3,499 93 


3,887 99 


2,761 82 


2,869 75 


Forestry, . 








392 77 


184 57 


50 


_ 


General agriculture, . 








- 


537 28 


_ 


51 63 


General horticulture, 








2,585 00 


2,791 01 


659 80 


599 54 


General maintenance, 








39,136 73 


63,093 90 


10,573 42 


22,094 07 


Graduate school, 








1,339 18 


1 50 


120 00 


_ 


Grounds, . 








1,900 61 


3,114 11 


1 70 


85 


History and government, 








- 


19 93 


- 


_ 


Landscape gardening, 








433 72 


444 55 


256 93 


473 03 


Language and literature, 








598 99 


544 37 


- 


_ 


Library, 








5,542 46 


6,591 12 


436 91 


590 40 


Market gardening, 










4,413 12 


4,452 21 


2,293 74 


1,851 94 


Mathematics, 










361 75 


209 81 


10 


_ 


Military, . 










1,939 42 


1,547 43 


24 79 


- 


Physics, 










- 


227 94 


- 


- 


Physical education, 










497 60 


570 99 


119 00 


121 50 


Political science, 










85 07 


- 


_ 


_ 


Pomology, . 










3,425 41 


3,502 47 


1,156 58 


1,233 52 


Poultry husbandry, 










- 


3,214 79 


- 


1,235 41 


President's office, 










873 68 


659 08 


28 44 


2 18 


Registrar's office, 










302 13 


383 00 


_ 


60 


Rural sociology, 










- 


39 69 


- 




Salaries, 










84,132 15 


113,525 51 


- 


- 


Treasurer's office, 










764 18 


891 20 


- 


6 88 


Veterinary, 










1,343 35 


1,464 03 


17 50 


19 35 


Zoology, 


493 40 


571 58 


346 30 


329 69 



58 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



[Feb. 



Comparative Disbursements and Receipts — Concluded. 





Disbursements. 


Receipts. 


Accounts. 












1911. 


1912. 


1911. 


1912. 


State Treasurer: — 










Endowment fund, 


- 


- 


$10,613 32 


$10,613 32 


Maintenance, .... 


- 


- 


35,000 00 


58,000 00 


Scholarship, .... 


- 


- 


15,000 00 


25,000 00 


Instruction, .... 


- 


- 


47,500 00 


60,000 00 


Extension service, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Agricultural education, 


- 


- 


5,000 00 


- 


Veterinary, ..... 


- 


- 


1,000 00 


- 


Student labor, .... 


- 


- 


7,500 00 


- 


Graduate school, 


- 


- 


2,500 00 


- 


United States Treasurer: — 










Morrill fund, .... 


- 


- 


16,666 66 


16,666 66 


Nelson fund, .... 


- 


- 


16,666 67 


16,666 67 




$215,941 81 


$254,391 63 


$201,555 22 


$242,407 87 


Balance beginning fiscal year, . 


- 


- 


25,211 22 


31,272 381 


Balance at close of fiscal year, . 


25,824 63 


19,288 62 


- 


- 




$241,766 44 


$273,680 25 


$226,766 44 


$273,680 25 



1 In closing accounts the balance of $35.81, Old Creamery House, was used to close up current 
accounts. 



Experiment Station. 

Disbursements and Receipts. 



Accounts. 



Disburse- 
ments from 
Dec. 1, 1911, 
to Nov. 30, 
1912. 



Receipts 

from 

Dec. 1, 1911, 

to Nov. 30, 

1912. 



Apportion- 
ment for 

Year ending 

Nov. 30, 

1912. 



Balance 

to 
Credit. 



Administration, .... 

Agricultural 

Asparagus, 

Botanical, 

Chemical 

Cranberry, 

Entomological 

Fertilizer 

Freight, 

Feed law 

Graves orchard, .... 
Horticultural, .... 

Library, 

Meteorology, .... 
Publications, .... 

Salaries, 

Treasurer's office, 

Veterinary, .... 

Hatch fund, .... 

Adams fund 

State fund, .... 

Poultry, 

Fertilizer law, .... 

Balance beginning fiscal year, Dec. 1 

1911, 

Balance on hand Nov. 30, 1912, 



$1,690 19 
4,469 62 
733 84 
1,127 23 
9,397 06 
3,228 96 
466 03 

275 76 
4,345 00 

676 33 

1,539 15 

89 48 

397 05 

1,263 53 

29,640 69 

253 18 

275 16 



247 55 
8,533 60 



$68,649 41 

3,084 29 
$71,733 70 



$2 94 
1,920 80 

6 17 

8,980 25 
2,337 89 



3,750 00 

30 00 

50 



113 00 

15,000 00 

15,000 00 

10,500 00 

10,000 99 



$1,800 00 
2,100 00 
500 00 
1,500 00 
2,900 00 
3,000 00 
700 00 

300 00 

3,750 00 

300 00 

1,350 00 

300 00 

400 00 

2,400 00 

37,500 00 

350 00 

250 00 



250 00 



$67,643 34 
.4,090 36 

$71,733 70 



$59,650 00 



$59,650 00 



$112 75 
-^49 02 
—233 84 

378 94 
2,483 19 
2,108 93 

233 97 

25 04 

1,081 45 

—346 33 

—188 65 

210 52 

2 95 

1,136 47 

7,859 31 

96 82 

87 84 



2 45 
1,467 39 



$17,288 02 
—1,217 84 

$16,070 18 



1913. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 



59 



Summary. 





Disbursements. 


Receipts. 


Cash on hand Dec. 1, 1911, 

Receipts from State Treasurer, 

Receipts from United States Treasurer, .... 

Total disbursements, 


$68,649 41 


$4,090 36 
14,250 00 
30,000 00 
23,393 34 


Bills receivable Nov. 30, 1912, 

Bills payable Nov. 30, 1912 


$68,649 41 

505 53 
4,973 71 


$71,733 70 
2,394 95 




$74,128 65 


$74,128 65 



Comparative Disbursements and Receipts for 1911-12. 















DlSB UHSEMENTS . 


Receipts. 


Accounts. 












1911. 


1912. 


1911. 


1912. 


Administration, .... 


$1,669 79 


$1,690 19 


$123 79 


$2 94 


Agriculture, 










4,864 07 


4,469 62 


2,128 14 


1,920 80 


Asparagus, 












748 63 


733 84 


- 


- 


Botanical, . 












1,577 35 


1,127 23 


20 82 


6 17 


Chemical, . 












9,809 16 


9,397 06 


7,165 66 


8,980 25 


Cranberry, 












4,038 98 


3,228 96 


4,232 00 


2,337 89 


Entomology, 












588 10 


466 03 


2 50 


- 


Fertilizer, . 












_i 


8,533 60 


6,094 83 


10,000 99 


Freight, 












294 49 


275 76 


- 


80 


Feed law, . 












2,891 44 


4,345 00 


3,000 00 


3,750 00 


Graves orchard, 












194 79 


676 33 


- 


30 00 


Horticulture, 












1,439 97 


1,539 15 


4 36 


50 


Library, 












161 56 


89 48 


- 


- 


Meteorology, 












322 16 


397 05 


- 


- 


Publications, 












1,726 40 


1,263 53 


- 


— 


Salaries, 












33,899 31 


29,640 69 


- 


- 


Treasurer's offics 












182 12 


253 18 


- 


- 


Veterinary, 












238 16 


275 16 


5 00 


113 00 


Hatch fund, 












- 


- 


15,000 00 


15,000 00 


Adams fund, 












- 


- 


15,000 00 


15,000 00 


State fund, 












- 


- 


10,500 00 


10,500 00 


Poultry, 












- 


247 55 


- 


- 


Tobacco experiments, 








340 20 


- 


- 


- 




$64,986 68 


$68,649 41 


$63,277 10 


$67,643 34 


Balance beginning fiscal year, . 


- 


- 


5,799 94 


4,090 36 


Balance on hand Nov. 30, 1912, 


4,090 36 


3,084 29 


- 


- 














$69,077 04 


$71,733 70 


$69,077 04 


$71,733 70 



1 Disbursements were included under plant and animal chemistry. 



60 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



[Feb. 



Extension Service. 
Disbursements and Receipts. 



Disburse- 
ments. 



Receipts. 



Apportion- 
ment. 



Balance. 



Miscellaneous, .... 

From State Treasurer, 

Administration, .... 

Correspondence courses, 

Itinerant instruction, 

Demonstration orchards, . 

Dairy improvement, . 

Boys' and Girls' Club, 

M. A. C. Improvement Association, 

Winter school, 

Poultry convention, 

Farmers' week, . 

Beekeepers' course, 

Packing school, . 

Summer school, . 

Conference Rural Social workers, 

District field agent, . 



Balance Dec. 1, 1911, . 
Balance Nov. 30, 1912, 



$14,459 53 

840 65 
310 79 
468 84 
377 71 
164 39 
161 64 
2,108 38 
124 66 
693 83 
151 61 
463 89 
6 40 
511 85 
425 89 



$21,270 06 
5,411 94 



$26,682 00 



$20,000 00 
462 92 
616 39 
55 59 
12 06 
93 78 
12 06 
33 78 
1,901 64 

23 11 

528 70 

43 12 

2 50 



$980 00 

13,320 00 

1,000 00 

200 00 

600 00 

600 00 

200 00 
1,500 00 
300 00 
500 00 
200 00 



600 00 



$23,785 65 
2,896 35 



$20,000 00 



$26,682 00 



$20,000 00 



$980 00 

—676 61 

775 74 

—55 20 

143 22 

316 07 

—152 33 

72 14 

1,293 26 

175 34 

—170 72 

48 39 

64 81 

36 72 

—509 35 

174 11 



$4,079 80 
—1,564 21 



2,515 59 



Summary. 





Disbursements. 


Receipts. 


Overdraft, Dec. 1, 1911 

Receipts, Nov. 30, 1912 

Receipts from State Treasurer, 

Disbursements, Nov. 30, 1912 


$5,411 94 
21,270 06 


$3,785 65 
20,000 00 


Bills payable Dec. 1, 1911, deducted, 


$26,682 00 
431 92 


$23,785 65 


Bills receivable Nov. 30, 1912 

Bills payable Nov. 30, 1912, 

Balance overdrawn Nov. 30, 1912 


$26,250 08 
916 95 


$23,785 65 
101 37 

3,280 01 




$27,167 03 


$27,167 03 



Agricultural Division. 
Disbursements and Receipts. 



Disbursements. 



Receipts. 



Agronomy, . 

Animal husbandry, 

Dairying, 

Farm administration, 

General agriculture, 

Poultry husbandry, 

Farm, . 

Division totals, 



$206 40 

264 01 

205 80 

212 66 

537 28 

3,214 79 

26,207 33 



$30,848 27 



$5 20 

3 89 

20 

11 38 

51 63 

1,235 41 

19,919 02 



$21,226 73 



1913.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 



61 



Sum?nary. 



Dr. 



Ce. 



By total division receipts, 
By bills receivable, 
By net apportionment, 
To total disbursements, 
To bills payable, . 
To balance, . 



$30,848 27 
294 16 



$31,142 43 



$21,226 73 
2,930 15 
6,100 00 



885 55 



$31,142 43 



Inventory of Quick Assets. 



Nov. 30, 1911. 



Nov. 30, 1912. 



Inventory of produce, 
Inventory of cattle, 
Inventory of swine, 
Inventory of horses, 
Inventory of poultry, 
Inventory of sheep, 



$4,728 73 
10,823 00 

485 00 
4,080 00 

614 25 



$20,730 98 



$7,010 93 

11,148 00 

731 00 

4,090 00 

1,524 15 

200 00 



$24,704 08 



Horticultural Division. 
Disbursements and Receipts. 



Disbursements. 



Receipts. 



Floriculture, 

Forestry, 

General horticulture, 

Grounds, 

Landscape gardening, 

Market gardening, 

Pomology, . 



$3,887 99 
184 57 
2,791 01 
3,114 11 
444 55 
4,452 21 
3,502 47 



$18,376 91 



$2,869 75 

599 54 ' 
85 

473 03 
1,851 94 
1,233 52 



$7,028 63 



Summary. 



Cr. 



By total division receipts, . 

By bills receivable, 

By apportionment, 

To total division disbursements, 

To bills payable, . 

To balance, . 



$18,376 91 

356 81 

1,033 56 



$19,767 28 



$7,028 63 

888 65 

11,850 00 



$19,767 28 



Inventory of Quick Assets. 




Nov. 30, 1911. 


Nov. 30, 1912. 




$1,064 00 


$621 25 



62 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



[Feb. 



Inventory — Real Estate. 
Land (Estimated Value). 



Baker place, 
Bangs place, 
Clark place, 
College farm, 
Cranberry land, 
Harlow farm, 
Kellogg farm, 
Louisa Baker place, 
Old creamery place, 
Pelham quarry, . 
Westcott place, . 
Allen place, 
Charmbury place, 
Loomis place, 
Hawley & Brown place, 
Newell farm, 



College Buildings (Estimated Value). 

Apiary, 

Animal husbandry building, 

Chemical laboratory, . 

Clark hall, . 

Cold storage laboratory, 

Dairy building, . 

Dairy barn and storage, 

Dining hall, 

Drill hall and gun shed, 

Durfee range and glass houses, old, 

Durfee range and glass houses, new, 

Entomology building, . 

Farmhouse, 

French hall, 

Horse barn, 

Horticultural barn, 

Horticultural tool shed, 

Machinery barn, 

Mathematical building, 

North dormitory, 

Physics laboratory, 

Poultry breeding house, 

Poultry brooder house, 

Poultry incubator cellar and 

Poultry laboratory, 

Poultry laying house, . 

Poultry mechanics and storage building, 

Power plant and storage building, 

President's house, 

Quarantine barn, 

Sheep shed, .... 

Small plant house, with vegetable cellar and cold grapery, 



demonstration building, 



$2,500 00 


2,350 


00 


4,500 


00 


37,000 00 


11,063 


00 


3,284 


63 


5,868 


45 


5,636 


91 


1,000 


00 


500 


00 


2,250 


00 


500 


00 


450 


00 


415 


00 


675 


00 


2,800 


00 


$80,792 99 


$3,000 00 


10,000 


00 


8,000 00 


67,500 


00 


12,000 


00 


75,000 


00 


30,000 


00 


35,000 


00 


10,000 


00 


10,000 


00 


15,000 


00 


80,000 00 


2,500 


00 


17,000 00 


5,000 00 


2,500 


00 


2,000 


00 


4,000 


00 


6,000 


00 


25,000 


00 


5,500 


00 


600 


00 


1,000 


00 


1,400 


00 


1,300 


00 


1,800 


00 


1,900 


00 


18,500 


00 


12,000 


00 


200 


00 


1,400 


00 


4,700 


00 



1913.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 



63 



College Buildings (Estimated Value) — Concluded 

South dormitory, .... 
Stone chapel, .... 
Three houses on Stockbridge Road, 
Veterinary laboratory and stable, . 
Waiting station, .... 

Wilder hall 

Young stock barn, 



College Equipment (Estimated Value) . 

Administrative division: — 

Dean's office, 

President's office, . 

Registrar's office, . 

Treasurer's office, . 
Agricultural division: — 

Agronomy, . 

Animal husbandry, 

Dairy, 

Farm administration, 

Farm department, 

Poultry, 
Dining hall, 
Extension department, 
General maintenance: — 

College supplies, . 

Fire apparatus, 

General maintenance, 

Janitor supplies, . 

Water mains, 
General science: — 

Apiary, 

Botanical, 

Chemical, 

Entomology, 

Microbiology, 

Mathematics, 

Physics, 

Veterinary, . 

Zoological laboratory, 

Zoological museum, 

History and political science, 
Horticultural division: — 

Floriculture, 

Forestry, 

General horticulture, 

Grounds, 

Landscape gardening, 

Market gardening, 

Pomology, 
Humanities, division of: — 

Economics and sociology, 

Language and literature, 



$35,000 00 


30,000 


00 


5,000 


00 


23,500 


00 


500 


00 


37,500 


00 


6,500 


00 


$607,800 00 


$212 


20 


952 


40 


263 


25 


2,360 


00 


1,737 


53 


1,173 


67 


7,545 


64 


1,278 49 


29,749 


69 


3,321 


63 


4,447 


50 


1,659 


35 


217 


82 


1,332 


32 


70,890 03 


253 


83 


8,350 


00 


1,145 


67 


7,991 


17 


10,642 


63 


5,921 


89 


2,000 


00 


3,312 


50 


2,559 


50 


8,390 


62 


8,945 


53 


6,411 


93 


20 75 


6,926 


66 


1,318 


64 


9,715 


2S 


248 


12 


4,575 78 


1,383 


49 


2,947 71 


93 


00 


279 


85 



64 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



[Feb. 



College Equipment (Estimated Value) — Concluded. 
Library, .... 
Military, .... 
Physical education, 
Rural social science: — 

Agricultural economics, 

Agricultural education, . 

Rural social service, 
Textbooks, 
Trophy room, 



Experiment Station Buildings (Estimated Value). 

Agricultural laboratory, 

Agricultural barns, 

Agricultural farmhouse, 

Agricultural glass house, 

Cranberry buildings, 

Plant and animal chemistry laboratory, 

Plant and animal chemistry barns, 

Plant and animal chemistry dairy, 

Six poultry houses, 

Entomological laboratory and glass house, 



Experiment Station Equipment (Estimated Value). 

Agricultural laboratory, 
Botanical laboratory, . 
Chemical laboratory, . 
Cranberry station, 
Director's office, . 
Entomological laboratory, 
Horticultural laboratory, 
Library, 

Meteorology laboratory, 
Poultry department, 
Treasurer's office, 
Veterinary laboratory, 



Inventory Summary. 



Land, .... 

College buildings, 
College equipment, 
Experiment station buildings, 
Experiment station equipment, 



$67,573 35 
1,264 42 
2,263 12 

237 25 

716 39 

90 35 

518 55 

1,504 80 



$294,744 30 


$15,000 00 


5,000 00 


1,500 00 


500 00 


2,720 00 


30,000 00 


4,000 00 


2,000 00 


600 00 


850 00 


$62,170 00 


$6,392 02 


5,101 20 


16,672 04 


2,167 49 


3,954 75 


23,242 50 


1,762 00 


320 00 


1,087 00 


543 35 


381 40 


121 94 


$61,745 69 


$80,792 99 


607,800 00 


294,744 30 


62,170 00 


61,745 69 



$1,107,252 98 



1913.1 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 



65 



Students' Trust Fund Accounts. 





Disburse- 
ments for 
Year ending 
Nov. 30, 
1912. 


Receipts 

for 

Year ending 

Nov. 30, 

1912. 


Balance on 

Hand 

Nov. 30, 

1912. 


Balance 
brought for- 
ward Dec. 
1, 1911. 


Athletics 


88,217 80 


$7,430 50 


$2,749 35 


$3,536 65 


Draper Hall, 










38,835 04 


39,783 05 


—742 79 


—1,690 80 


"College signal," 










1,913 81 


1,972 48 


608 83 


550 16 


Keys, . 










15 00 


16 25 


31 75 


30 50 


Harlow farm, 










96 45 


120 00 


—141 08 


164 63 


Student deposits, 










5,792 67 


7,119 86 


1,881 74 


554 55 


Kellogg farm, 










152 78 


141 66 


24 57 


35 69 


Trophy room tax, 










945 56 


959 91 


622 92 


608 57 


1914 index, . 










94 03 


119 00 


24 97 


- 


Textbooks, . 










4,766 89 


4,811 78 


426 93 


382 04 


1913 index, . 










1,422 18 


1,357 42 


28 42 


93 18 


1912 index, . 










68 52 


44 75 


- 


23 77 


Kappa Sigma House, 








47 70 


47 70 


- 


- 


Uniforms, . 








487 37 


2,281 40 


2,633 65 


239 62 












$62,855 80 


$66,805 76 


$9,033 13 


$6,054 73 



Detailed Statement of the Dining Hall. 





Liabilities. 


Resources. 


Dec. 1, 1911, overdraft, 

Nov. 30, 1912, total disbursements, 

Nov. 30, 1913, outstanding bills, .... 

Nov. 30, 1912, total collections 

Nov. 30, 1912, total collections outstanding, 

Nov. 30, 1912, inventory 

Nov. 30, 1912, balance, .... 


$1,690 80 

38,709 75 

703 56 

1,065 05 


$39,393 55 
1,018 11 
1,757 50 




$42,169 16 


$42,169 16 



Endowment Fund. 1 





Principal. 


Income. 


United States grant (5 per cent. ) 

Commonwealth grant (3J^ per cent.), .... 


$219,000 00 
142,000 00 


$7,300 00 
3,313 32 




$10,613 32 



1 This fund is in the hands of the State Treasurer, and the Massachusetts Agricultural 
College receives two-thirds of the income from the same. 



66 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



[Feb. 



Beneficiary Funds. 

Bumham Emergency Fund. 





Market 

Value Dec. 

1, 1912. 


Par Value. 


Income. 


Two bonds American Telephone and Telegraph Company 

4s, at $890 

Two bonds Western Electric Company 5s, at $1,010, 
Unexpended balance Dec. 1, 1911, 


$1,780 00 
2,020 00 


$2,000 00 
2,000 00 


$80 00 
100 00 
600 55 


To amount paid for C. A. Goessmann library, 


$3,800 00 


$4,000 00 


$780 55 
1,000 00 


Overdraft Dec. 1, 1912, 


- 


- 


$219 45 



Library Fund. 

Five bonds New York Central & Hudson River Railroad 
Company 4s, at $920, . 

Five bonds Lake Shore & Michigan Southern Railroad 
Company 4s, at $930, 

Two snares New York Central & Hudson River Railroad 
Company stock, at $108, 

Amherst Savings Bank, deposit, 

Transferred to college library account, .... 



$4,600 00 
4,650 00 

216 00 

167 77 



$9,633 77 



$5,000 00 
5,000 00 



200 00 
167 77 



$10,367 77 



Special Funds. 
Endowed Labor Fund (the Gift of a Friend of the College) . 



Two bonds American Telephone and Telegraph Company 
4s, at $890, . . . . . . . . 

Two bonds Lake Shore & Michigan Southern Railroad 
Company 4s, at $930, . . _ 

One bond New York Central Railroad debenture 4s, 

Amherst Savings Bank, deposit, 

One bond Metropolitan Street Railway, Kansas City 
Company 5s, at 



Unexpended balance Dec. 1, 1911, 
Cash on hand Dec. 1, 1912, . 



$1,780 00 

1,860 00 
920 00 
143 39 

990 00 



$5,693 39 



$2,000 00 

2,000 00 

1,000 00 

143 39 

1,000 00 



$6,143 39 



Whiting Street Scholarship Fund. 



One bond New York Central debenture 4s, . 


$920 00 
271 64 


$1,000 00 
271 64 


$40 00 
10 84 




$1,191 64 


$1,271 64 


$50 84 
18 47 


Disbursements for scholarships for fiscal year ending Nov. 
30, 1912, 


; 


: 


$69 31 
23 00 


Cash on hand Dec. 1, 1912 


- 


- 


$46 31 



1913. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 



67 



Hills Fund. 



Market 

Value Dec. 

1, 1912. 



Par Value. 



Income. 



Northampton Institution for Savings, deposit, 

One bond American Telephone and Telegraph Company 4s, 

One bond New York Central & Hudson River Railroad 

debenture 4s, ........ . 

One bond New York Central & Hudson River Railroad 

debenture 3}^s, 

Two bonds Metropolitan Street Railway of Kansas City 

5s, at $990, 

Three bonds Pacific Telephone and Telegraph Company 

5s, at $990, . 

One bond Western Electric Company 5s, . 

Boston & Albany Railroad stocks, 3% shares at $213, 

Amherst Savings Bank, deposit, 

Electric Securities Company stocks, %o shares at $1,000, . 

Less overdraft Dec. 1, 1911, 



On April 17, 1912: 

We withdrew our deposit from the North- 
ampton Institution for Savings and in- 
vested it with the Mary Robinson portion 
of funds in the purchase of two bonds of 
the Electric Securities Company of New 
York at par, . . . . . $1,180 00 

Disbursements by floriculture and botanical depart- 
ments for fiscal year ending Nov. 30, 1912, 



Cash on hand Dec. 1, 1912, 



$1,180 00 
890 00 



800 00 

1,980 00 

2,970 00 

1,010 00 

772 12 

72 75 

1,180 00 



$1,180 00 
1,000 00 

1,000 00 

1,000 00 

2,000 00 

3,000 00 

1,000 00 

362 00 

72 75 

1,180 00 



$10,594 87 



$10,614 75 



$20 65 
40 00 

40 00 

35 00 

100 00 

150 00 
50 00 
31 68 
2 88 
29 50 



$499 71 
170 55 



$329 16 



216 58 



$112 58 



Mary Robinson Fund. 



Northampton Institution for Savings, .... 
Boston & Albany Railroad stock, % share at $213, . 
Electric Securities Company stocks, 4 ^o share at $1,000, . 


$820 00 

79 86 

820 00 


$820 00 
38 00 
820 00 


$14 35 
3 32 
20 50 




$899 86 


$858 00 


$38 17 
89 89 


On April 17, 1912: — 

We withdrew our deposit from the North- 
ampton Institution for Savings and in- 
vested it with a portion of the Hills fund 
in the purchase of two bonds of the Elec- 
tric Securities Company of New York at 
par, $820 00 

Disbursements for fiscal year ending Nov. 30, 1912, 






$128 06 
28 66 


Cash on hand Dec. 1, 1912 


- 


- 


$99 40 



Grinnell Prize Fund. 



Ten shares New York Central & Hudson River Railroad 

stock at $108, 

Unexpended balance Dec. 1, 1911 


$1,080 00 


$1,000 00 


$50 00 
195 74 




$1,080 00 


$1,000 00 


$245 74 
50 00 


Cash on hand Dec. 1,1912 


- 


- 


$195 74 



68 



AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



[Feb. 



Massachusetts Agricultural College (Investment). 





Market 

Value Dec. 

1, 1912. 


Par Value. 


Income. 


One share New York Central & Hudson River Railroad 


$108 00 


$100 00 


$5 00 
55 45 


Cash on hand Dec. 1, 1912, 


- 


- 


$60 45 



Gassett Scholarship Fund. 






One bond New York Central & Hudson River Railroad 


$920 00 
11 64 


$1,000 00 
11 64 


$40 00 
44 




$931 64 


$1,011 64 


$40 44 
10 51 


Disbursements for scholarships for fiscal year ending Nov. 
30, 1912, 


~ 


_ 


$50 95 
20 00 


Cash on hand Dec. 1, 1912, . . 


- 


- 


$30 95 



Danforth Keyes Bangs Fund. 






Two bonds Pacific Telephone and Telegraph Company 
5s, at $990 

Two bonds Union Electric Light and Power Company 5s, 
at $990, 

Two bonds American Telephone and Telegraph Company 
4s, at $890 


$1,980 00 
1,980 00 
1,780 00 


$2,000 00 
2,000 00 
2,000 00 


$100 00 

100 00 

80 00 
10 45 


Unexpended balance Dec. 1, 1911, 


$5,740 00 


$6,000 00 


$290 45 
531 57 




- 


- 


$822 02 
420 00 


Cash on hand Dec. 1, 1912, 


- 


- 


$402 02 



John C. Cutter Fund. 



One bond Pacific Telephone and Telegraph Company 5s, 
Unexpended balance Dec. 1, 1911, 


$990 00 


$1,000 00 


$50 00 
78 33 


Disbursements for fiscal year to date, .... 


- 


- 


$128 33 
53 61 




- 


- 


$74 72 



1913. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 



69 



Summary of Balances on Hand op the Income from Funds held in 
Trust by the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Hills fund 

Endowed labor fund, . 
Whiting Street scholarship fund, 
Mary Robinson fund, . 
Grinnell prize fund, 
Gassett scholarship fund, 
Massachusetts Agricultural Colleg 
Danforth Keyes Bangs fund, 
John C. Cutter fund, . 



Burnham emergency fund overdraft, 











$112 


58 










503 


11 










46 


31 










99 


40 










195 


74 










30 


95 


e investment, 








60 

402 


45 
02 










74 72 




$1,525 28 


ft, 


219 45 


$1,305 83 



I hereby certify that I have this day examined the Massachusetts Agricultural 
College account, as reported by the treasurer, Fred C. Kenney, for the year ending 
Nov. 30, 1912. All bonds and investments are as represented in the treasurer's 
report. All disbursements are properly vouched for, and all cash balances are 
found to be correct. 

CHAS. A. GLEASON, 

Auditor. 
Amherst, Dec. 23, 1912. 



History of Special Funds. 

Burnham emergency fund: — 

A bequest of $5,000 from T. O. H. P. Burnham of Bos- 
ton, made without any conditions. The trustees of 
the college directed that $1,000 of this fund should 
be used in the purchase of the Newell land and Goess- 
mann library. The fund now shows an investment of $4,000 00 

Library fund: — 

The library of the coUege at the present time contains 
about 38,000 volumes. The income from the fund 
raised by the alumni and others is devoted to its in- 
crease, and additions are made from time to time as 
the needs of the different departments require. Dec. 
27, 1883, William Knowlton gave $2,000; Jan. 1, 1894, 
Charles L. Flint gave $1,000; in 1887 Elizur Smith of 
Lee, Mass., gave $1,215. These were the largest 
bequests, and amount now to . . . . . 10,000 00 

Endowed labor fund: — 

Gift of a friend of the college in 1901, income of which is 
to be used for the assistance of needy and deserving 
students, 5,000 00 



70 AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. [Feb. 

Whiting Street scholarship: — 

Gift of Whiting Street of Northampton, for no special 
purpose, but to be invested and the income used. 
This fund is now used exclusively for scholarship, . $1,000 00 
Hills fund : — 

Gift of Leonard M. and Henry F. Hills of Amherst, Mass., 

in 1867, to establish and maintain a botanic garden, . 10,000 00 
Mary Robinson fund: — 

Gift of Miss Mary Robinson of Medfield, in 1874, for 

scholarship, 1,000 00 

Grinnell prize fund : — 

Gift of Hon. Wm. Claflin, to be known as the Grinnell 
agricultural prize, to be given to the two members of 
the graduating class who may pass the best oral and 
written examination in theory and practice of agri- 
culture, given in honor of George B. Grinnell of New 

York, 1,000 00 

Gassett scholarship fund : — 

Gift of Henry Gassett of Boston, the income to be used 

for scholarship, 1,000 00 

Massachusetts Agricultural College investment fund: — 

Investment made by vote of trustees, in 1893; to purchase 
one share New York Central & Hudson River Railroad 
stock. The income from this fund has been allowed 
to accumulate, ....... 100 00 

Danf orth Keyes Bangs fund : — 

Gift of Louisa A. Baker of Amherst, Mass., April 14, 1909, 
the income thereof to be used annually in aiding poor, 
industrious and deserving students to obtain an 
education in said college, ..... 6,000 00 

John C. Cutter fund: — 

Gift of Dr. John C. Cutter of Worcester, Mass., an alumnus 
of the college, who died in August, 1909, to be invested 
by the trustees, and the income to be annually used 
for the purchase of books on hygiene, . . . 1,000 00 

$40,100 00 

Prizes. 
Sophomore prize in botany, given by Prof. A. V. Osmun of the 
department of botany, to that member of the sophomore 
class who presents the best herbarium in the regular course 
(this prize was first offered in 1908 with the hope that it 
might stimulate a greater interest on the part of the stu- 
dents in this line of work), $5 00 



1913.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 31. 71 

Special prize, given by the Western Alumni Association to that 
member of the sophomore class who during his first two 
years has shown the greatest improvement in scholarship, 
character and example, ....... $25 00 

Animal husbandry. The F. Lothrup Ames prize, given by F. 
Lothrup Ames, Langwater Farms, North Easton, Mass., 
consisting of f 150 a year, offered for a period of five years, 
to be given to the three students standing highest in the 
work of advanced live stock judging, and to be used in 
defraying their expenses incurred by participation in the 
students' judging contest at the National Dairy Show, 
Chicago. Given in May, 1912, available first in autumn 
of 1912, and for the four succeeding years, . . . 150 00 



$180 00 



FRED C. KENNEY, 

Treasurer. 



iHassarljttstftis JVgrfrttltttral Cnltegtf 

THE EXTENSION SERVICE 

Summer School of Agriculture 
and Country Life 




AMHERST, MASS. 

JULY 1- AUGUST 2, 1913 



itasart}U0i>tt0 Agricultural (Hultege Sulbttu 

VOLUME V NUMBER 3 MARCH 1913 



THE AMHERST MOVEMENT" 



SUMMER SCHOOL OF 



AGRICULTURE AND COUNTRY LIFE 



AND 



SCHOOL FOR RURAL SOCIAL WORKERS 




THE COLLEGE POND 



AMHERST, MASS. 



Published six times a year by the Massachusetts Agricultural College, January, February, 
March, May, September and October. 

Entered as second-class matter at the Postoffice, Amherst, Mass. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 



The Summer School of Agriculture and Country Life at Massachusetts 
Agricultural College will open July i, 1913, for a term of four weeks, closing 
July 29. This will be the sixth session of this Summer School, those of the 
past five years having been highly successful. The experience of these five 

years will aid in mak- 
,... mm ing material improve- 

X ments for the session 

',■*£ of 1913. The work of 

'4i the Summer School 

M was designed origi- 

i M nally for school teach- 

'■/ i* vj ers, and the attendance 

" --•— -».* ' M nas been largely of 

that class. Special 
attention will be given 
to the needs of teach- 
ers again this year. 
It has been found, 
however, that there 
are many persons who 
seek a general knowl- 
edge of theoretical and 
practical agriculture 
and who can come to 
the college conven- 
iently during the sum- 
mer season. Extended courses will be offered for the benefit of such per- 
sons also. The courses offered for the current year may be somewhat 
roughly grouped as follows : 

1. Course in practical agriculture and horticulture. 

2. Courses in elementary sciences bearing on agriculture and horticul- 

ture. 

3. Courses in agricultural education'. 

4. Courses in agricultural economics and rural sociology. 

5. Courses on play and recreation. 

6. Courses in domestic economy and household science. 

7. Groups of courses, arranged especially for Rural Social Workers, but 

open^also to others interested in community development. 





THE CHAPEL 



4 " THE AMHERST MOVEMENT " 

From these courses it will be possible to make up programs of work suita- 
ble to the needs of almost everyone, but especially to school teachers, prin- 
cipals, superintendents, school committeemen, farm owners, householders, 
suburban residents, clergymen, pastors, preachers, social workers, and those 
who have only a general interest in agriculture. Persons who are in doubt 
as to what courses will suit their needs should correspond with the Director 
of the Summer School, who will gladly advise in all such matters. 



CALENDAR FOR THE SUMMER SCHOOL 

Monday, June 30. Registration. 

July 1. Courses for first two weeks begin. 

July 4 (holiday). Demonstration of municipal celebration of the day. 

Townspeople and college co-operating. 
July 15. Registration day for clergymen and other rural leaders. 
July 16. Courses of second two weeks begin. 
July 16 — 23. Boys' camp. 
July 29 (noon). Summer School ends. 

July 29 (2 p. m.) Conference for Rural Community Leaders begins. 
August 2 (afternoon). Conference for Rural Community Leaders ends. 



SUMMER SCHOOL FACULTY 

Kenyon L. Butterfield, LL. D. President of the College. Head of Division 
of Rural Social Science. 

William D. Hurd, M. Agr. Director of The Extension Service. 

Robert H. Bogue, B. Sc. Assistant in Chemistry. 

Alexander E. Cance, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics. 

Joseph Chamberlain, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Organic and Agricul- 
tural Chemistry. 

William D. Clark, M. F. Professor of Forestry. 

Laura Comstock. Extension Professor (elect) of Home Economics. 

Samuel Coons. Instructor in Butter making. 

Guy C. Crampton, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Entomology. 

Elmer K. Eyerly, A. M. Associate Professor of Rural Sociology. 

Burton N. Gates, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Beekeeping. 

B. C. Georgia, B. Sc. Instructor in Market Gardening. 

Harold M. Gore, M. A. C. '13. Assistant in Boys' Camp. 

John C. Graham, B. Sc. Agr. Associate Professor of Poultry Husbandry. 

Charles R. Green, B. Agr. Librarian. 

F. Josephine Hall. Adviser for Women, Waltham, Mass. 

William R. Hart, A. M. Professor of Agricultural Education. 

Sidney B. Haskell, B. Sc. Associate Professor of Agronomy. 

Curry S. Hicks, B. Sc. Assistant Professor of Physical Education and 
Hygiene. 



" THE AMHERST MOVEMENT " 5 

George S. Holcomb, A. B., S. T. B. Lecturer in History. 

William P. B. Lockwood, B. Sc. Agr. Associate Professor of Dairying. 

Frederick A. McLaughlin, B. Sc. Assistant in Botany. 

John A. McLean, A. B., B. Sc. Agr. Associate Professor of Animal Hus- 
bandry. 

C. J. Maynard. Author and Lecturer on Bird Life, West Newton, Mass. 

Orion A. Morton. Extension Professor of Agricultural Education. 

E. L. Morgan, A. M. Community Field Agent. 

A. Vincent Osmun, M. Sc. Assistant Professor of Botany. 

Charles A. Peters, Ph. D. Associate Professor of Inorganic and Soil 
Chemistry. 

Laura Post. Assistant in Physical Education, Wellesley College, Welles- 
ley, Mass. 

Edward Tallmadge Root. Secretary of the Federation of Churches of 
Massachusetts and Rhode Island, Boston. 

Frederick W. Ried. Director of Practical Arts, State Normal and Training 
Schools, Framingham, Mass. 

John A. Scheuerle. Formerly pastor of County Church, Hartford, Vt. 

George E. Stone, Ph.D. Professor of Botany. 

Frank A. Waugh, M. Sc. Head of Division of Horticulture and Professor 
of Landscape Gardening. 

Edward A. White, B. S. Professor of Floriculture. 



Committees of the Summer School Faculty 

COURSES OF STUDY AND REGISTRATION 

Professors Haskell, Graham, Cance, Hurd. 

EXCURSIONS 

Professors White, Osmun, Hurd. 

SOCIAL EVENINGS 

Professors Sears, Hart, McLean, Hurd, Miss Hall 

ATHLETICS AND RECREATION 

Professors Lockwood, Waugh, Eyerly, Hicks, Hurd, Miss Post. 

So far as possible, the members of the Summer School faculty are se- 
lected from the regular faculty of the College. Where instructors are en- 
gaged from other institutions great care is taken to secure men and women 
eminent in their respective lines of work. 



6 " THE AMHERST MOVEMENT " 

THE COURSES OF STUDY 

Group A. General Agriculture, Dairying and Animal Hus- 
bandry. 

1. Soils, Tillage and Field Crops. The chemical, physical and bio- 
logical composition of the soil and the relation of each to plant growth ; the 
formation of soils ; the natural and artificial sources of fertility ; the methods 
and implements of tillage ; the whole forming an introduction to modern 
scientific agriculture. In class room and field exercises some attention will 
be paid to the methods used in producing grasses, corn, potatoes and 
other crops, under New England conditions. Five exercises a week for 
four weeks. Professor Haskell 




3. Modern Dairying. 



2. Domestic Animals. This course will deal with the different breeds 
and types of farm animals. Two main lines of work will be studied, viz. : 
judging and feeding. Greater attention will be devoted to horses and dairy 
cattle. Living domestic animals supply the best of all objects for teaching 
purposes in primary and intermediate schools, and this course should prove 
veryisuggestive to capable teachers. Five hours a week for four weeks. 

Professor McLean 
A strictly up-to-date course in the production 
and handling of milk and cream, probably the 
most important branch of agricultural industry 
in Massachusetts. The course will be practical 
rather than theoretical, and will cover briefly : 
composition and secretion of milk ; principles 
and methods of creaming ; abnormal milk and 
causes ; proper handling of milk and cream on 
the farm ; value of milk as food ; relation of 
milk to the public health ; handling and care of 
milk in the home ; methods used in production 
of sanitary and certified milk. Five hours a 
week for four weeks. Professor Lockwood 




" THE AMHERST MOVEMENT " 

4. A Dairy Laboratory Course. Consists of 

First week — Two 2-hour periods in Babcock testing. 
Second week — Two 2-hour " Market milk work. 

Third week — Two 2-hour " Separator work. 

Fourth week — Two 2-hour " Butter making. 

Students taking this course are required to take Course 3. Mr. Coons. 





STOCK AT PASTURE 



5. Poultry Breeding and Management. Course will cover the follow- 
ing subjects : Poultry house construction ; incubation and breeding ; care 
of poultry in summer ; winter egg production ; marketing eggs and poultry ; 
poultry diseases. Laboratory work will consist of caring for incubators 
and brooders and managing young chicks. In addition to this, as much 
practical work as possible will be given. This will include poultry carpen- 
try, caring for breeders and layers, also some elementary work in judging. 
Three lectures and two laboratory periods a week for four weeks. 

Professor Graham 



8 



THE AMHERST MOVEMENT" 



Group B. Horticulture, Forestry, Landscape Gardening. 

6. Fruit Growing. Modern methods of propagating, planting, culti- 
vating, pruning, fertilizing and 
spraying fruit trees; of planning 
and managing orchards ; selling 
fruit. Lectures, demonstrations 
and ample field exercises Five 
exercises a week for four weeks 
Professor Sl-.ars 




7. Practical Gardening. — 
This course will consist almost 
wholly of practical field exer- 
cises in planting, training, culti- 
vating, etc., and while no special 
effort will be made to put the spraying demonstration 
work into common school form, the exercises will be especially valuable to 
school garden teachers. Course limited to twenty pupils. Five exercises a 
week for four weeks. Mr. Georgia 

8. Trees, Shrubs and Herbaceous Perennials. This course deals with 
the identification, propagation and culture of native and introduced species. 
It enables the student to select wisely from the many species those best 
suited for home, school or park planting, and emphasizes the attractive 
points of the better species. Five exercises a week, first two weeks. 

Professor White 




wilder hall 
9. Horn Flower Growing. A course designed to give information re- 
garding the culture of tender annuals and perennials. The propagation and 



•' THE AMHERST MOVEMENT " 9 

culture of such plants as carinas, dahlias, sweet peas, pansies and the like ; 
the propagation of annuals from seed and by cuttings, in dwelling houses or 
school rooms ; plants for window boxes, piazza boxes or urns, and the gen- 
eral culture of all plants as it may be carried on without glass houses. Five 
exercises a week for last two weeks. Professor White 

10. Forestry. This course of ten lectures will cover the growth of the 
forestry movement in this country ; the status of forestry in the United 
States and abroad, and the possibilities of better forestry in Massachusetts. 
The problems of woodland management will be briefly discussed and specific 
problems will be considered at private conference hours by appointment. 
Five lectures a week for the first two weeks. Professor Clark 




FOREST NEAR AMHERST 

11. Landscape Gardening. Some of the elementary principles of the 
art in their immediate application to the improvement of school grounds, 
the treatment of home grounds and to village and rural improvement ; also, 
the use of landscape study as a branch of art for teaching in the public 
schools. Five lectures a week for first two weeks. Professor Waugh 



Group C. Sciences Related to Agriculture. 

12. Elementary Chemistry. An introduction to chemistry, with special 
reference to agriculture and agricultural industries. The course consists 
largely of laboratory experiments and is adapted especially to science teach- 
ers or to those who wish to know something of this fundamental science. 
Five 2-hour exercises a week for four weeks. Mr. Bogue 



10 " THE AMHERST MOVEMENT " 

J3. Agricultural Chemistry. This course considers briefly some of 
the more common and important facts, in the chemistry of soils, fertilizers, 
plants and animals, studying their composition, reactions and relations to 
each other and showing the reasons for agricultural practices ; the prepara- 
tion of substances of agricultural importance, such as superphosphates, lead 
arsenate, Bordeaux mixture, etc. It is aimed to make the course practical 
and suggestive, especially to those engaged in Agricultural High School 
work, and it is therefore largely experimental. As some previous knowledge 
of chemistry is assumed, Course 12 or its equivalent is required. Five 2-hour 
exercises a week for four weeks. 

Professors Chamberlain and Peters 

14. Plant Experiments and School Demonstration Material. A lec- 
ture course illustrated by simple experiments in plant life, with home-made 
apparatus and methods of preparing plant material useful in schools, such 
as seeds and seedlings, common plant diseases, etc. A valuable course for 
science teachers and others interested in plant life. Five exercises a week 
for first two weeks. Professor Stone and Mr. McLaughlin 

15. General Botany. Morphology, physiology and ecology of plants. 
This course is especially suited to the needs of science and nature study 
teachers and amateur botanists. Previous training in the subject is not re- 
quired. Five lectures a week for second two weeks. Professor Osmun 

16. Cryptogamic Botany. This is largely a laboratory course, con- 
sisting of stereoscopic and field study of lower forms of plant life, including 
algae, fungi, mosses and ferns. The major portion of the time may be de- 
voted to some special group if desired by the class. Previous training in 
botany is required. Limited to twenty pupils. Three 2-hour exercises for 
second two weeks. Professor Osmun 

17. Bird Life. A study of the local bird fauna, conducted largely in 
the field. Special attention is given to economic relations of the birds and 
to nesting habits. Five exercises a week for first two weeks. 

Mr. Maynard 

18. Insects and Disease. A course of lectures dealing with the symp- 
toms and causes of the commonest insect-borne diseases, in which especial 
emphasis is laid upon the part played by insects in the transmission of dis- 
ease and modern sanitary methods for the prevention of disease dissemina- 
tion. This course is entirely independent of the other courses offered in 
entomological subjects, and no previous preparation is necessary. Two 
lectures a week for four weeks. Professor Crampton 

19. Insect Life. An introductory course arranged with especial refer- 
ence to the needs of teachers in the grade schools and high schools, and 
also those expecting to take up lines of agricultural work where some knowl- 
edge of insects is desirable. The forms selected for study are those easily 
obtained and of economic importance. How to recognize them and their 
work and how to control them will be given especial attention, and methods 



THE AMHERST MOVEMENT 



11 



of making collections will also be included. A portion of the time will be 
spent in the field, studying insects under natural conditions. Three class 
and two laboratory or field periods a week for four weeks. 

Professor Crampton 

20. Entomology. A course planned to follow the preceding, and for 
persons who already have some knowledge of the subject. Careful studies 
of insect life histories and habits, and of forms not included in the introduc- 
tory course. Two lectures, one 2-hour and one i-hour laboratory periods a 
week for four weeks. Professor Crampton 




AFTER A PICKING. M. A. C. SCHOOL GARDEN 



21. Beekeeping. A course designed particularly for school teachers or 
beginners in the subject. It comprises the elementary and practical features 
of the beekeeping industry, including equipment, handling and manipulation 
of bees, essential apparatus ; also a discussion of the diseases and names of 
the honey bee ; the utilization of bees as nature study material in the lecture 
and school room, as well as for pleasure. Five lectures and such laboratory 
periods as can be arranged each week second two weeks. 

Professor Gates 

22. Handicrafts and Practical Arts, A course to include design and 
its application to rural school projects, such as binding and its various prob- 
lems, basketry, elementary weaving, thin and thick cardboard, construction, 
leather work, bagging projects, rural dyeing and sandtable construction work 
directly related to pre-vocational geography and history. Five exercises a 
week for four weeks. Mr. Ried 



12 



" THE AMHERST MOVEMENT " 



Group D. Home Economics. 

23, Home Economics for Rural and Village Schools. The aim of 
this course will be to give work in elementary cookery, including both theory 
and practice. This will be suggestive to those interested in the " noon " 
lunch problem of village or country school. Special points discussed will be 
adequate equipment and cost of same ; nature and kind of food materials ; 
the setting of the table, serving, correct table etiquette ; care of the house ; 
personal hygiene ; sanitation. Four lectures and two cookery demonstra- 
tions each week for first two weeks. 

Professor Comstock, assisted by Miss Borden 




ORGANIZED PLAY, 1912 CONFERENCE 



24. Home Economics. A course which will give one an insight into 
the general work of home economics. Special emphasis will be placed on 
three distinct phases — food, household management and sanitation. Three 
lectures and two demonstrations a week for four weeks. 

Professor Comstock, assisted by Miss Borden 

25. Household Science. This course is intended primarily for the 
wives of clergymen who take work in the summer school. Properly bal- 
anced menus, budget making, household accounts and systematic house- 
keeping are topics that will be discussed. Five lectures a week for second 
two weeks. Professor Comstock, assisted by Miss Borden 



" THE AMHERST MOVEMENT " 



13 



Group E. Agricultural Education. 

26. Rura) School Problems. This course will consist of lectures, dis- 
cussions and readings on such topics as rural school supervision, courses of 
study for rural schools, rural school buildings and other equipment, qualifi- 
cations of rural teachers, and methods of instruction as influenced by a rural 
school curriculum. Five lectures a week for first two weeks. 

Professor Hart 

27. Home and School Gardens. This course will consist of lectures, 
discussions and readings on such topics as planning and instruction in gar- 
den work, care of school gardens during vacations, supervision of home 
gardens, relation of garden and home work to the school work, agricultural 
clubs, exhibition of products and canning clubs. Five lectures a week for 
second two weeks. To follow Course 26. Professor Morton 



Group F. Organized Play aud Recreation. 

28. School Hygiene and Rec- 
reation. This course will consist 
of lectures on rural school hygiene 
and sanitation ; demonstrations of 
plays and games for children in 
rural schools. Five lessons a week 
for first two weeks. 

Professor Hicks, 
and Miss Post 



29. Organized Play and Rec- 
reation. A course discussing the 
place which organized play may 
take in community development. 
Such subjects as methods of or- 
ganizing and directing the activi- 
ties, games, athletics, festivals and 
pageantry will be taken up. Dem- 
onstrations will be given. Five 
lectures a week with extra after- 
noon demonstrations for second 
two weeks. 

Instructor to be announced 



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GIRLS' CAMPFIRE MOVEMENT, 
1912 CONFERENCE 



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16 "THE AMHERST MOVEMENT" 

SCHOOL FOR RURAL SOCIAL WORKERS 

This year more of a feature will be made of the group of courses given 
especially for those who might be classed as Rural Social Workers. These 
courses are intended for clergymen, teachers, librarians, town officers, grange 
workers and others who devote a considerable portion of their time to prob- 
lems of community development. Courses 30 to 36 inclusive, as given in 
this bulletin, are designed for the needs of these persons. All other courses 
given during this period are also open to those who register. 

From all of these courses a group of studies can be arranged which will 
present the rural problem from several standpoints, and will serve to show 
the relationships of the workers in the different lines to their respective 
fields and to the larger community problems which are constantly being pre- 
sented to them. 



Group G. Courses especially for Rural Social Workers, 

30. Practical Problems in New England Agriculture. An outline of 
the agricultural situation in New England discussed from the standpoint of 
production. Such subjects as the soil and maintenance of fertility, economic 
use of commercial fertilizers, and the production of such staple crops as 
corn, potatoes and hay, under New England conditions, will be considered. 
Five lectures, third week. Professor Hurd 

31. Economic Aspects of New England Agriculture. A series of 
ten lectures on agriculture considered as an industry and on some of the 
immediate social and economic problems of the farmer. Some of the topics 
treated are : The characteristics of the agricultural industry ; the relation 
of agriculture to other industries ; the maintenance of the economic position 
of the farmer ; the farmer and the market ; co-operative endeavors ; organi- 
zation of the rural social forces. The lectures will deal in a very general 
and simple way with the problems of farm life, and are designed to give a 
helpful viewpoint to teachers and leaders in rural communities. Five lec- 
tures a week second two weeks. Professor Cance 

32. The Church and Rural Problem. The church and its spiritual 
relationship to the community and the place the church and its pastor should 
take in the economic and industrial development of the community. The 
subjects will be divided by Mr. Root and Mr. Schuerle. Five lectures a 
week second two weeks. Rev. Edward Tallmadge Root and Mr. 
John A. Schuerle. 

33. Sociological Aspects of New England Agriculture. Personal quali- 
ties and social conditions necessary to successful co-operative endeavor ; the 
various forms of co-operative organizations viewed in their industrial, intel- 
lectual and moral aspects ; the influence of co-operation on the farmers' in- 
dividualism, conservatism, self-help, thrift, contentment, and on agrarian 
legislation, scientific agriculture and farm labor; the relation of co-operation 



THE AMHERST MOVEMENT " 



IT 



to neighborhood life, to community pride and loyalty, to further associated 
effort, to class stability, solidarity and status ; the demand of co-operation 
for a new type of leadership, the relation of co-operation to socialism and 
the competitive system. Five lectures a week second two weeks. 

Professor Eyerly 

34. Rural Literature. A study of the literature, both prose and poe- 
try, which interprets nature from the viewpoint of the lover of country life, 
and presents the idealistic side of agriculture and other rural pursuits. Five 
lectures a week for second two weeks. Professor Holcomb 




EXCURSION TO STUDY SOIL FORMATIONS 



35. Community Co-operation in the Re-directing of the Rural and 
Village School. This course will include a brief history of the general 
development of the graded school, its advantages and disadvantages from 
the standpoint of the country school, present strong and weak phases, pres- 
ent trend, future possibilities, and the constructive assistance which the 
community may give in the work of re-direction. Five lectures, fourth week 

Professor Morton 

36. The Development of the Community. A course dealing with the 
principles underlying progress in rural communities ; relation of community 
forces, ideals and leadership to progress ; principles of community control ; 
the community analysis ; the community progress program. Five lectures 
a week, second two weeks. Professor Morgan. 



18 



THE AMHERST MOVEMENT " 



GENERAL PLAN OF THE SUMMER SCHOOL WORK 

The formal instruction in the Summer School is given in definite courses 
herein described. From these each pupil may elect courses of not less than 
ten nor more than fifteen exercises a week, unless a larger or smaller amount 
of work is allowed by the Director. These courses include a large amount 
of field work, observation trips, outdoor exercises and laboratory experi- 
ments. 

Besides these, general field exercises will be arranged for one afternoon 
•■of each week. These will be on topics of interest to all. Excursions 
will be arranged for every Wednesday afternoon, and more extended excur- 
sions for the whole school will be planned for every Saturday. The excur 




THE DINING HALL 



sions will be in charge of an instructor as heretofore. In the past they have 
proved a very enjoyable feature of the work. 

Round table and special discussions will be arranged by various instruc- 
tors as their courses require. A conference of rural social workers and edu- 
cators of New England will be held July 29 to August 2. An outline of the 
conference will be found in another part of this bulletin. 

A boys' camp, demonstrating proper methods of conducting such work, 
will be held July 16—23, inclusive. 

A course of evening lectures on popular topics relating to the work of the 
school will be a feature of the general program. Several able lecturers have 
already been engaged for this course. Like everything else connected with 
the Summer School, this lecture course is entirely free to all students. 



THE AMHERST MOVEMENT" 



19 



COLLEGE EQUIPMENT 

The Massachusetts Agricultural College is endowed by the Federal gov- 
ernment and by the State of Massachusetts for teaching and investigation 
in agriculture in the broadest sense. The College has a farm of over 500 
acres in a high state of cultivation, and illustrates all the leading agricultural 
industries of Massachusetts and some of the best agricultural specialties. 
There is a large new range of greenhouses of the most modern and approved 
type just completed within the past year ; there is a modern dairy barn with 
dairy cattle ; there are good horses, pure-bred swine, sheep and poultry ; 






THE COLLEGE BARNS 



there are fields of corn, potatoes, clover and grass in season ; orchards oF 
apple, peach, plum and pear trees ; tracts of good forest land, nurseries, 
market gardens, greenhouses, etc. A good school garden, maintained by 
co-operation between the College and the Amherst schools, will be in opera- 
tion. There are also considerable tracts devoted to experiments, many of 
which are of unusual interest. Then there are well-equipped departments of 
botany, entomology and chemistry, dealing in the most thorough manner 
with these special sciences. All of this equipment (much more than can be 
described or even named) will be placed at the service of the Summer- 
School. 



20 " THE AMHERST MOVEMENT " 



ELECTION OF COURSES 

Election of courses should be made at the time of registration. Every 
election is subject to the approval of the Director and of the instructor 
whose course is elected. As it will be necessary to schedule several courses 
at the same time, certain combinations of courses will be made unavailable. 
It should be specially noticed that certain courses are offered to a limited 
number of pupils only, and as a rule pupils will be accepted in these courses 
in the order of application. Each pupil should choose such combinations 
of courses as will keep two or three subjects in hand at the same time. This 
will meet the requirement that each one must take at least ten and not more 
than fifteen exercises a week, unless permitted to take more or less by special 
order of the Director. 



REGISTRATION, ATTENDANCE, ETC. 

Those who expect to attend should register as early as possible. Regis- 
tration fee for the Summer School is $5, payable at the time application is 
made. Registration fee for the clergymen attending the courses and con- 
ferences given especially for them is $1. No other tuition is charged. These 
fees should accompany application blanks and should be made payable to 
the Director of the Summer School, or the College Treasurer. A schedule 
and registration blank are to be found in the back part of this bulletin. 
Registration fees will be refunded to those who find it impossible to attend 
the school. 

Attendance will be required in the courses elected. Some sort of exami- 
nation, test or permanent note book will be required in each course. Those 
who complete courses in a satisfactory manner, including practically perfect 
attendance, will be given certificates at the close of the term showing what 
work has thus been completed. 

There are no rules or regulations. Persons are not admitted to the Sum- 
mer School who are not old enough to know how to conduct themselves, and 
everyone is expected to know and conform to the usages of good society. 
This absence of rules has worked admirably in the past, and it gives every- 
one a sense of freedom based on personal responsibility, the basis of all 
proper government, whether in school, college or the community. 

Tuition is absolutely free, and there are no incidental charges. The 
College is supported by the State and the Federal governments, and receives 
no payments whatever from Summer School pupils except for room, board, 
and the registration fee, as mentioned above. 



THE AMHERST MOVEMENT" 



21 




ROOMS AND BOARD 

Rooms will be provided in the College dormitories and in private houses 
adjoining the College grounds. In general, the dormitory rooms are in 
suites of two bedrooms, opening into one study room, the bedrooms fur- 
nished with single beds. These rooms are nearly all located in two dormi- 
tories known as 
North College and 
South College. The 
toilet and bath- 
rooms are in the 
basements and 
water is not pro- 
vided in the rooms. 
While the appoint- 
ments in general 
are not those of a 
high-priced summer 
hotel, they are sani- 
tary and comforta- 
ble, and have been 
found pleasant to 
men students for 
the north dormitory many yea rs and by 

the women students of the Summer School during four summers. A uni- 
form rate of $1.25 a week for each person will be charged for these rooms, 
and each pupil will be expected to supply her own blankets, sheets, pillow 
cases, towels and napkins. Convenient arrangements for laundry work may 
be made in Amherst. 

The dormitories are reserved for women students exclusively. 

All requests for dormitory rooms must be made to, and rooms 

will be assigned by the College Treasurer. A deposit of $2.00 is 

required in order to have a room in a dormitory reserved. This 

deposit is not refunded to those who find it impossible to attend. 

The College will also supply a small number of first-class United States 
army wall tents for those who wish them. Each tent will accommodate two 
persons. The tents will be placed in a pleasant and convenient location on 
the College campus, and every reasonable provision will be made for the 
comfort of the occupants. This form of domicile has been found very ac- 
ceptable in other summer schools, chatauquas and camps. Those who care 
for real outdoor life at its best will find these arrangements genuinely en- 
joyable. The charge for these tents will be $1 a week for each person. 

Rooms outside the College vary considerably in their accommodations 
and somewhat in price, the charge ranging from $1.50 to $2.50 a week for 
each person. A few days prior to the opening of the Summer School 



22 



" THE AMHERST MOVEMENT " 



the College will make a canvass of the village in order to obtain a 
list of available rooms. This will be furnished Summer School 
students at the time of registration. Fvery effort v ill be made by 
those in charge to see that everyone has comfortable accommoda- 
tions. 

As far as possible, everyone who registers at the Summer School will be 
allowed to select his or her own room, either in the College dormitories or 
outside, and such selections will be offered strictly in the order of registra- 



»J8i 




OFF FOR A TROLLY EXCURSION 



tion. The Summer School management, however, reserves the right to 
make such shifts and readjustments as may be necessary for the greater con- 
venience and comfort of all. 

Excellent meals are served in Draper Hall, on the College grounds. 
Meals will be served on an a la carte basis at very low cost and should not 
amount to more than $4.00 or $4.50 a week. Good boarding places can be 
secured outside the College if desired. 



"THE AMHERST MOVEMENT" 23 

ATHLETICS AND RECREATION 

Athletics and sports of various kinds occupy a prominent place in the 
Summer School. Tennis tournaments for both men and women and base- 
ball teams are organized. Contests with teams from nearby towns are held, 
subject to the approval of the proper committee. This year, under compe- 
tent supervision, demonstrations of organized play, recreation, folk dancing, 
and so forth will be given. Late afternoon and early evening periods will 
be used for this purpose. 

The region around Amherst is especially rich in attractive places for 
tramping, excursions and picnics. 

The management of the Summer School usually arranges plenty of these 
forms of recreation. 

EVENING LECTURES AND SOCIAL LIFE 

The management of the Summer School provides at least one evening 
lecture each week. These lectures are usually given by men of international 
reputation, and deal with practical, social and economic subjects related 
to rural life. 

One or two social evenings are arranged for each week. This, together 
with evening lectures, the regularly scheduled Wednesday and Saturday ex- 
cursions, the afternoon field trips for study, make life at the Summer School 
extremely enjoyable as well as profitable. These social evenings are under 
the direction of a committee of the faculty, working with the Summer School 
students. 

CHAPEL AND VESPERS 

Chapel exercises, fifteen minutes in length, are held each morning in the 
College chapel. At this time announcements for the day are given. 

Vespers are held each Sunday afternoon at 5 o'clock, usually out-of-doors. 
Well-known preachers and other religious workers are engaged for these 
services, and special music is provided. 

THE REGION SURROUNDING AMHERST 

Amherst is one of the most delightful towns in New England, and has 
long been noted for the natural scenic beauties surrounding it, and as an 
educational center. It is located in the heart of the Connecticut valley. The 
Holyoke range, Mt. Tom, Mt. Holyoke, Mt. Toby, the Orient, the Con- 
necticut River, Rattlesnake Gutter, Whately Glen, Old Deerfield, and other 
places of great scenic beauty and historic interest are within easy walking, 
trolley or driving distance. The Berkshire and Hampshire Hills country is 
easily accessible. 

The climate is good and usually not excessively warm during the Summer 
School. 



24 " THE AMHERST MOVEMENT " 

The surroundings of the Summer School, its organization and methods of 
work, are such as to make a stay of two to four weeks enjoyable in every 
way. It furnishes the pleasan test sort of outdoor life, with just enough of 
work and recreation, under the simplest possible organization. From the 
first, special attention has been given to the outdoor exercises and recrea- 
tion features of the program, and these will be still further emphasized in 
1913. The whole atmosphere of the place is such that a vacation spent at 
the Summer School, with moderate work, is more interesting and refreshing 
than the same time spent at a seaside or mountain resort. 

SUMMER CAMP FOR BOYS. 

JULY 16 TO 23. 

During the week above mentioned a summer camp for boys will be main- 
tained in connection with the Summer School. The main purposes of this 
camp are four-fold: — 

1. To interest boys in agriculture and rural life. 

2. To impress on the boy his responsibilities as a member of society. 

3. To teach these boys clean, wholesome sports, recreation and 

proper spirit in competitive contest. 

4. To demonstrate the value of a Boys' Camp as an educational 

factor. 

The camp will be under military discipline. The daily program will con- 
sist of instruction in agriculture, hygiene, citizenship, etc., each forenoon. 
The afternoon will be given over to organized play, recreation, games, tramps 
through the hills, evening camp fires, etc., all managed and directed by 
experts. 

Shelter will be provided by tents. Meals will be furnished at the 
College dining hall. 

The camp will be limited to seventy-five boys, reservations being made 
for five from each county in the state before others are taken in. The 
system of selecting these boys from each county will be determined later. 

Boys between the ages of twelve and seventeen will be admitted. 

Boys will be received on the afternoon of July 16 and are expected to 
leave by noon July 23. One change of outer clothing, necessary under- 
clothing, blankets and towels must be brought by each boy. 

Seven dollars will be charged each boy for the week. This will be used 
to defray cost of maintaining the camp, board, instruction and supervision. 

Requests for registration should be made before June 15. 

A descriptive circular explaining in full detail this boys' camp will be 
ready May 15, and can be had by writing the Director of the Summer 
School. 



" THE AMHERST MOVEMENT " 



25 



CONFERENCE OF RURAL COMMUNITY LEADERS 

JULY 29— AUGUST 2. 

The Conference of Rural Leaders which has been held for the past three 
years as a closing feature of the Summer School will take place as usual. 

The following organizations have promised to co-operate with the College 
by furnishing teachers and lecturers for their respective sections : 

The Federation of Churches of Massachusetts ; The State Board of Edu- 
cation ; The Free Public Library Commission ; The Massachusetts Civic 
League ; The State Board of Health ; The County Work of the Young 
Men's Christian Association ; The National Board of the Young Women's 



■ 


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0*9* ml |-^ yMm 



ORGANIZED PLAY, IQI2 CONFERENCE 



Christian Association ; The New England Home Economic Association ; 
The Russell Sage Foundation and The State Grange. 

Definite class instruction will be given each morning. The afternoons 
will be given up entirely to special and general conferences on what seem to 
be the most important subjects in our rural life, demonstrations of organized 
play, recreation, etc. The evenings will be given over to music and lectures 
by the most eminent men who are making a study of rural sociology, eco- 
nomics and education. 

The Rural Social Service exhibits will be more elaborate and extensive: 
than in 1912. 



26 " THE AMHERST MOVEMENT " 

The object of this conference is to acquaint those who are leaders in their 
respective communities with the work that is going on, not only in Massa- 
chusetts, but in New England and other parts of the world, and to give them 
renewed inspiration and enthusiasum for larger and more intelligent efforts. 

Teachers, clergymen, grange officers, librarians, county Y. M. C. A. work- 
ers, town officers, boards of health, officers of village improvement societies, 
homemakers, school officers and all others interested in community develop- 
ment, are cordially invited to attend this Conference. The expenses for 
board and room are low. There are no tuition or registration fees. 

A complete program will be published next June and can be had by mak- 
ing application for it to the Director of the Summer School. 

Location of and Directions for Reaching Amherst 

Amherst is situated in the Connecticut valley, amidst fertile farms and 
surrounded by wooded hills. It is ninety-seven miles west of Boston and 
twenty-five miles from Springfield. It can be reached from Boston over the 
Boston and Maine Railroad (Southern Division from North Station) or by the 
Boston and Albany Railroad from South Terminal Station via Palmer, 
thence to Amherst over the Central Vermont Railroad. 

It may also be reached from Springfield or Greenfield by the Boston and 
Maine Railroad via Northampton, or by trolley from Springfield via Hol- 
yoke or Northampton. 

From New York, take New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad to 
Springfield, then to Amherst by train or trolley as already stated. 

Persons coming from Albany, Buffalo and the West would best come to 
Springfield and then to Amherst as stated above. 

For information concerning the Summer School, write 

WILLIAM D. HURD, Director, 

Massachusetts Agricultural College 
Amherst, Mass. 



Massachusetts Agricultural College 

SUMMER SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE 



APPLICATION FOR REGISTRATION 



Name (Mr., Mrs. or Miss) 

Post Office Street address . 



State Present occupation. 



Schools previously attended . 



Name of person to whom word may be sent 
in case of illness or accident , 



Address of above person. 



Reference 

Consult the schedule and place an X 
Send this blank to the Director. 
Course. 
i. Soils, Tillage and Field Crops. 

2. Domestic Animals. 

3. Modern Dairying. 

4. Dairy Laboratory. 

5. Poultry Breeding and Management. 

6. Fruit Growing. 

7. Practical Gardening. 

8. Trees, Shrubs and Herbaceous 

Perennials. 

9. Home Flower Growing. 

10. Forestry. 

11. Landscape Gardening. 

12. Elementary Chemistry. 

13. Agricultural Chemistry. 

14. Plant Experiments and School Dem 

stration Material. 

15. General Botany. 

16. Cryptogamic Botany. 

17. Bird Life. 

18. Insects and Disease. 

19. Insect Life. 



I wish to take weeks' work, beginning. 

Room preference (read bulletin carefully) .... 

Accepted . . 



after each course you wish to take. 



Course. 

20. Entomology. 

21. Beekeeping. 

22. Handicrafts and Practical Arts. 

23. Home Economics for Rural and 

Village Schools. 

24. Home Economics. 

25. Household Science. 

26. Rural School Problems. 

27. Home and School Gardens. 

28. School Hygiene and Recreation. 

29. Organized Play and Recreation, 

Pageantry. 

30. Practical Problems in New England 

Agriculture. 

31. Economic Aspects of New England 

Agriculture. 

32. The Church and Rural Problem. 

33. Sociological Aspects of New England 

Agriculture. 

34. Rural Literature. 

35. Rural Education. 

36. The Development of the Community. 



Director. - 



Date received 



Fees 
Ref. . 



THE EXTENSION SERVICE 

" THE AMHERST MOVEMENT " 

School for Rural Social Workers 

In Connection with the Regular Summer School 




AMHERST, MASS. 

JULY 16-29, 1913 



Supplement to M. A. C. Bulletin, Vol. V., No. 3 

Published six times a year by the Massachusetts Agricultural College, January, February, 
March, May, September and October. 

Entered as second-class matter at the Postoffice, Amherst, Mass. 



2 " THE AMHERST MOVEMENT " 

ANNOUNCEMENT 

For the fifth season the Massachusetts Agricultural College offers a School 
for Rural Social Workers, in connection with the usual Summer School of 
Agriculture and Country Life. 

The social service spirit is abroad all over this country, and men are turn- 
ing their attention to these subjects as never before. The courses offered 
this summer will give instruction, furnish information and direct the atten- 
tion of those interested more particularly to the rural field, which has as yet 
received little systematic study, when compared with that which has been 
given city conditions. 

This year more of a feature will be made of the group of courses given 
especially for those who might be classed as Rural Social Workers. These 
courses are intended for clergymen, teachers, librarians, town officers, grange 
workers and others who devote a considerable portion of their time to prob- 
lems of community development. Courses 30 to 36 inclusive, as given in 
this bulletin, are designed for the needs of these persons. All other courses 
given during this period are also open to those who register. 

From all of these courses a group of studies can be arranged which will 
present the rural problem from several standpoints, and will serve to show 
the relationships of the workers in the different lines to their respective 
fields and to the larger community problems which are constantly being pre- 
sented to them. 

CALENDAR 

Registration for regular Summer School, ... June 30 

Registration for School for Rural Social Workers, - ■ - July 15 

Boys' camp, - ... July 16 — 23 

Summer School ends, ..... July 29 (noon) 

Conference of Rural Community Leaders, - - July 29— Aug. 2 

Note. This is not the complete bulletin of the Summer School, but a 
reprint from portions of it and a supplement to it. The complete bulletin 
may be obtained by writing the Director of the Summer School. 

SUMMER SCHOOL FACULTY 

Kenyon L. Butterfield, LL. D. President of the College. Head of Division 
of Rural Social Science. 

William D. Hurd, M. Agr. Director of The Extension Service. 

Robert H. Bogue, B. Sc. Assistant in Chemistry. 

Marion W. Borden. Assistant in Home Economics, Providence, R. I. 

Alexander E. Cance, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics. 

Joseph Chamberlain, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Organic and Agricul- 
tural Chemistry. 

William D. Clark, M. F. Professor of Forestry. 

Laura Comstock. Extension Professor (elect) of Home Economics. 

Samuel Coons. Instructor in Butter making. 

Guy C. Crampton, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Entomology. 

Elmer K. Eyerly, A. M. Associate Professor of Rural Sociology. 

Burton N. Gates, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Beekeeping. 



" THE AMHERST MOVEMENT " 3 

B. C. Georgia, B. Sc. Instructor in Market Gardening. 
Harold M. Gore, M. A. C. '13. Assistant in Boys' Camp. 

John C. Graham, B. Sc. Agr. Associate Professor of Poultry Husbandry. 

Charles R. Green, B. Agr. Librarian. 

F. Josephine Hall. Adviser for Women, Waltham, Mass. 

William R. Hart, A. M. Professor of Agricultural Education. 

Sidney B. Haskell, B. Sc. Associate Professor of Agronomy. 

Curry S. Hicks, B. Sc. Assistant Professor of Physical Education and 
Hygiene. 

George S. Holcomb, A. B., S. T. B. Lecturer in History. 

William Chauncy Langdon. Expert in Pageantry, New York City. 

William 'P. B. Lockwood, B. Sc. Agr. Associate Professor of Dairying. 

Frederick A. McLaughlin, B. Sc. Assistant in Botany. 

John A. McLean, A. B., B. Sc. Agr. Associate Professor of Animal Hus- 
bandry. 

C. J. Maynard. Author and Lecturer on Bird Life, West Newton, Mass. 
Orion A. Morton. Extension Professor of Agricultural Education. 

E. L. Morgan, A. M. Community Field Agent. 

A. Vincent Osmun, M. Sc. Assistant Professor of Botany. 

Charles A. Peters, Ph. D. Associate Professor of Inorganic and Soil 
Chemistry. 

Laura Post. Assistant in Physical Education, Wellesley College, Welles- 
ley, Mass. 

Edward Tallmadge Root. Secretary of the Federation of Churches of 
Massachusetts and Rhode Island, Boston. 

Frederick W. Ried. Director of Practical Arts, State Normal and Training 
Schools, Framingham, Mass. 

John A. Scheuerle. Formerly pastor of County Church, Hartford, Vt. 

George E. Stone, Ph.D. Professor of Botany. 

Frank A. Waugh, M. Sc. Head of Division of Horticulture and Professor 
of Landscape Gardening. 

Edward A. White, B. S. Professor of Floriculture. 

THE COURSES OF STUDY 

Group G. Courses especially for Rural Social Workers, 

30. Practical Problems in New England Agriculture. An outline of 
the agricultural situation in New England discussed from the standpoint of 
production. Such subjects as the soil and maintenance of fertility, economic 
use of commercial fertilizers, and the production of such staple crops as 
corn, potatoes and hay, under New England conditions, will be considered. 
Five lectures, third week. Professor Hurd 

31. Economic Aspects of New England Agriculture. A series of 
ten lectures on agriculture considered as an industry and on some of the 
immediate social and economic problems of the farmer. Some of the topics 
treated are : The characteristics of the agricultural industry ; the relation 
of agriculture to other industries ; the maintenance of the economic position 
of the farmer ; the farmer and the market ; co-operative endeavors ; organi- 
zation of the rural social forces. The lectures will deal in a very general 
and simple way with the problems of farm life, and are designed to give a 



4 " THE AMHERST MOVEMENT " 

helpful viewpoint to teachers and leaders in rural communities. Five lec- 
tures a week second two weeks. Professor Cance 

32. The Church and Rural Problem. The church and its spiritual 
relationship to the community and the place the church and its pastor should 
take in the economic and industrial development of the community. The 
subjects will be divided by Mr. Root and Mr. Schuerle. Five lectures a 
week second two weeks. Rev. Edward Tallmadge Root and Mr. 
John A. Schuerle. 

33. Sociological Aspects of New England Agriculture. Personal quali- 
ties and social conditions necessary to successful co-operative endeavor ; the 
various forms of co-operative organizations viewed in their industrial, intel- 
lectual and moral aspects ; the influence of co-operation on the farmers' in- 
dividualism, conservatism, self-help, thrift, contentment, and on agrarian 
legislation, scientific agriculture and farm labor; the relation of co-operation 
to neighborhood life, to community pride and loyalty, to further associated 
effort, to class stability, solidarity and status ; the demand of co-operation 
for a new type of leadership, the relation of co-operation to socialism and 
the competitive system. Five lectures a week second two weeks. 

Professor Eyerly 

34. Rural Literature. A study of the literature, both prose and poe- 
try, which interprets nature from the viewpoint of the lover of country life, 
and presents the idealistic side of agriculture and other rural pursuits. Five 
lectures a week for second two weeks. Professor Holcomb 

35. Community Co-operation in the Re-directing of the Rural and 
Village School. This course will include a brief history of the general 
development of the graded school, its advantages and disadvantages from 
the standpoint of the country school, present strong and weak phases, pres- 
ent trend, future possibilities, and the constructive assistance which the 
community may give in the work of re-direction. Five lectures, fourth week 

Professor Morton 

36. The Development of the Community. A course dealing with the 
principles underlying progress in rural communities ; relation of community 
forces, ideals and leadership to progress ; principles of community control ; 
the community analysis ; the community progress program. Five lectures 
a week, second two weeks. Professor Morgan 

OTHER COURSES IN PROGRESS 

During the period when the courses just mentioned are being given, sev- 
eral other courses in the Summer School will be in progress. These are 
also open to those who come for the two weeks only. 

The following are the courses : 
Course No. i. Soils and Tillage— Professor Haskell. 



Domestic Animals — Professor McLean. 

Modern Dairying — Professor Lockwood. 

Poultry Breeding and Management — Professor Graham. 

Fruit Growing — Professor Sears. 

Practical Gardening — Mr. Georgia. 



" THE AMHERST MOVEMENT " 

Course No. 9. Home Flower Gardening— Professor White. 

15. General Botany — Professor Osmun. 

16. Cryptogamic Botany — Professor Osmun. 

18. Insects and Diseases — Professor Crampton. 

19. Insect Life — Professor Crampton. 

20. Entomology — Professor Crampton. 

21. Beekeeping — Professor Gates. 

22. Practical Arts — Mr. Ried. 

24. Home Economics — Professor Comstock. 

25. Household Science — Professor Comstock. 

27. Home and School Gardens — Professor Morton. 

29. Organized Play and Recreation— Mr. Langdon. 



SUMMER CAMP FOR BOYS. 

JULY 16 TO 23. 

During the week above mentioned a summer camp for boys will be main" 
tained in connection with the Summer School. The main purposes of this 
camp are four-fold :— 

1. To interest boys in agriculture and rural life. 

2. To impress on the boy his responsibilities as a member of society. 

3. To teach these boys clean, wholesome sports, recreation and 

proper spirit in competitive contest. 

4. To demonstrate the value of a Boys' Camp as an educational 

factor. 

The camp will be under military discipline. The daily program will con- 
sist of instruction in agriculture, hygiene, citizenship, etc., each forenoon. 
The afternoon will be given over to organized play, recreation, games, tramps 
through the hills, evening camp fires, etc., all managed and directed by 
experts. 

Shelter will be provided by tents. Meals will be furnished at the 
College dining hall. 

The camp will be limited to seventy-five boys, reservations being made 
for five from each county in the state before others are taken in. The 
system of selecting these boys from each county will be determined later. 

Boys between the ages of twelve and seventeen will be admitted. 

Boys will be received on the afternoon of July 16 and are expected to 
leave by noon July 23. One change of outer clothing, necessary under- 
clothing, blankets and towels must be brought by each boy. 

Seven dollars will be charged each boy for the week. This will be used 
to defray cost of maintaining the camp, board, instruction and supervision. 

Requests for registration should be made before June 15. 

A descriptive circular explaining in full detail this boys' camp will be 
ready May 15, and can be had by writing the Director of the Summer 
School. 

Clergymen having boys in their parishes whom they would like to place 
in the camp for instruction[should make early application. 



6 " THE AMHERST MOVEMENT " 

CONFERENCE OF RURAL COMMUNITY LEADERS 

JULY 29— AUGUST 2. 

The Conference of Rural Leaders which has been held for the past three 
years as a closing feature of the Summer School will take place as usual. 

The following organizations have promised to co-operate with the College 
by furnishing teachers and lecturers for their respective sections : 

The Federation of Churches of Massachusetts ; The State Board of Edu- 
cation ; The Free Public Library Commission ; The Massachusetts Civic 
League ; The State Board of Health ; The County Work of the Young 
Men's Christian Association ; The National Board of the Young Women's 
Christian Association ; The New England Home Economic Association ; 
The Russell Sage Foundation and The State Grange. 

Definite class instruction will be given each morning. The afternoons 
will be given up entirely to special and general conferences on what seem to 
be the most important subjects in our rural life, demonstrations of organized 
play, recreation, etc. The evenings will be given over to music and lectures 
by the most eminent men who are making a study of rural sociology, eco- 
nomics and education. 

The Rural Social Service exhibits will be more elaborate and extensive 
than in 191 2. 

The object of this conference is to acquaint those who are leaders in their 
respective communities with the work that is going on, not only in Massa- 
chusetts, but in New England and other parts of the world, and to give them 
renewed inspiration and enthusiasum for larger and more intelligent efforts. 

Teachers, clergymen, grange officers, librarians, county Y. M. C. A. work- 
ers, town officers, boards of health, officers of village improvement societies, 
homemakers, school officers and all others interested in community develop- 
ment, are cordially invited to attend this Conference. The expenses for 
board and room are low. There are no tuition or registration fees. 

A complete program will be published next June and can be had by mak- 
ing application for it to the Director of the Summer School. 

It is hoped that a large number of clergymen will attend this conference. 

EXPENSES, ROOM, BOARD, REGISTRATION, ETC. 

There is no tuition charged in any of the Summer School courses. A 
registration fee of one dollar is paid by all clergymen attending the School 
for Rural Social Workers. To others the fee is five dollars, the same as 
for other students in the regular Summer School. 

Board will be furnished on an a. la carte plan at Draper Hall, the college 
dining hall. At the low prices charged, good board ought not to cost more 
than four or four fifty a week. 

Rooms can be obtained in private houses in the village at a cost of one 
dollar and a half to three dollars a week. An effort will be made to secure 
the use of some of the college fraternity houses for Summer School stu- 
dents. These will be assigned to groups of persons interested in the same 
lines of work, so far as is possible. 



THE AMHERST MOVEMENT 



COLLEGE EQUIPMENT 

The Massachusetts Agricultural College is endowed by the Federal gov- 
ernment and by the State of Massachusetts for teaching and investigation 
in agriculture in the broadest sense. The College has a farm of over 500 
acres in a high state of cultivation, and illustrates all the leading agricultural 
industries of Massachusetts and some of the best agricultural specialties. 
There is a large new range of greenhouses of the most modern and approved 
type just completed within the past year; there is a modern dairy barn with 
dairy cattle ; there are good horses, pure-bred swine, sheep and poultry ; 
there are fields of corn, potatoes, clover and grass in season ; orchards of 
apple, peach, plum and pear trees ; tracts of good forest land, nurseries, 
market gardens, greenhouses, etc. A good school garden, maintained by 
co-operation between the College and the Amherst schools, will be in opera- 
tion. There are also considerable tracts devoted to experiments, many of 
which are of unusual interest. Then there are well-equipped departments of 
botany, entomology and chemistry, dealing in the most thorough manner 
with these special sciences. All of this equipment (much more than can be 
described or even named) will be placed at the service of the Summer 
School. 



ATHLETICS AND RECREATION 

Athletics and sports of various kinds occupy a prominent place in the 
Summer School. Tennis tournaments for both men and women and base- 
ball teams are organized. Contests with teams from nearby towns are held, 
subject to the approval of the proper committee. This year, under compe- 
tent supervision, demonstrations of organized play, recreation, folk dancing, 
and so forth will be given. Late afternoon and early evening periods will 
be used for this purpose. 

The region around Amherst is especially rich in attractive places for 
tramping, excursions and picnics. 

The management of the Summer School usually arranges plenty of these 
forms of recreation. 



EVENING LECTURES AND SOCIAL LIFE 

The management of the Summer School provides at least one evening 
lecture each week. These lectures are usually given by men of international 
reputation, and deal with practical, social and economic subjects related 
to rural life. 

One or two social evenings are arranged for each week. This, together 
with evening lectures, the regularly scheduled Wednesday and Saturday ex- 
cursions, the afternoon field trips for study, make life at the Summer School 
extremely enjoyable as well as profitable. These social evenings are under 
the direction of a committee of the faculty, working with the Summer School 
students. 



8 " THE AMHERST MOVEMENT " 

CHAPEL AND VESPERS 

Chapel exercises, fifteen minutes in length, are held each morning in the 
College chapel. At this time announcements for the day are given. 

Vespers are held each Sunday afternoon at 5 o'clock, usually out-of-doors. 
Well-known preachers and other religious workers are engaged for these 
services, and special music is provided. 

THE REGION SURROUNDING AMHERST 

Amherst is one of the most delightful towns in New England, and has 
long been noted for the natural scenic beauties surrounding it, and as an 
educational center. It is located in the heart of the Connecticut valley. The 
Holyoke range, Mt. Tom, Mt. Holyoke, Mt. Toby, the Orient, the Con- 
necticut River, Rattlesnake Gutter, Whately Glen, Old Deerfield, and other 
places of great scenic beauty and historic interest are within easy walking, 
trolley or driving distance. The Berkshire and Hampshire Hills country is 
easily accessible. 

The climate is good and usually not excessively warm during the Summer 
School. 

The surroundings of the Summer School, its organization and methods of 
work, are such as to make a stay of two to four weeks enjoyable in every 
way. It furnishes the pleasantest sort of outdoor life, with just enough of 
work and recreation, under the simplest possible organization. From the 
first, special attention has been given to the outdoor exercises and recrea- 
tion features of the program, and these will be still further emphasized in 
1913. The whole atmosphere of the place is such that a vacation spent at 
the Summer School, with moderate work, is more interesting and refreshing 
than the same time spent at a seaside or mountain resort. 

Location of and Directions for Reaching Amherst 

Amherst is situated in the Connecticut valley, amidst fertile farms and 
surrounded by wooded hills. , It is ninety-seven miles west of Boston and 
twenty-five miles from Springfield. It can be reached from Boston over the 
Boston'and Maine Railroad (Southern Division from North Station) or by the 
Boston and Albany Railroad from South Terminal Station via Palmer, 
thence to Amherst over the Central Vermont Railroad. 

It may also be reached from Springfield or Greenfield by the Boston and 
Maine Railroad via Northampton, or by trolley from Springfield via Hol- 
yoke or Northampton. 

From New York, take New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad to 
Springfield, then to Amherst by train or trolley as already stated. 

Persons coming from Albany, Buffalo and the West would best come to 
Springfield and then to Amherst as stated above. 

For information concerning the Summer School, write 

WILLIAM D. HURD, Director, 

Massachusetts Agricultural College 
Amherst, Mass. 



THE M. A. C. BULLETIN 

AMHERST, MASS. 
Vol. V. No. 4. For May, 1913 

CATALOG 

OF 







E 




OF THE 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Published six times a year by the 

MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

January, February, March, May, September, October 



Entered as second class matter at the Post Office, Amherst. Mass. 



■■■ '.;..' *? 



CATALOG 



OF 



Graduates and Former Students 



OF THE 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



PUBLISHED BY 
THE COLLEGE AND ASSOCIATE ALUMNI 
MAY, 1913 



^^THIS alumni address list has been compiled and is published under 
1|L the direction of the Associate Alumni and the College. So far 
as can be ascertained, it is the only catalog of its kind that has 
ever been issued of the alumni and former students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 

The usual class list is followed by a geographical index, and also by an 
alphabetical list of all graduates and former students. An earnest en- 
deavor has been made to publish a list which is complete, accurate 
.and up-to-date. The editors realize, however, that in all of these respects 
the catalog is defective. 

It is hoped that a similar' list may be published once in two or three 
years, and that the next edition may be more satisfactory than the first. 
To this end we invite all interested to co-operate with us in supplying 
information here omitted and in correcting noticeable errors. 

Philip H. Smith, 

Secretary of the Associate Alumni. 

Ralph J. Watts, 

Secretary to the President. 

May 15, 1913. 



CLASS SECRETARIES 

1871 E. E. Thompson, 5 Jacques Avenue, Worcester, Mass. 

1872 F. E. Kimball, 8 John St., Worcester, Mass. 

1873 C. Wellington, Amherst, Mass. 

1874 D. G. Hitchcock, Warren, Mass. 

1875 M. Bunker, Newton, Mass. 

1876 C. Fred Deuel, Amherst, Mass. 

1877 Atherton Clark, Newton, Mass. 

1878 C. O. Lovell, 5 Bromfield St., Boston, Mass. 

1879 R. W. Swan, 41 Pleasant St., Worcester, Mass. 

1880 Alvan Fowler, 413 Post Office Building, Philadelphia, Pa. 

1881 J. L. Hills, 50 North Prospect St., Burlington, Vt. 

1882 G. D. Howe, 38 Whittier Ave., Springfield, Mass. 

1883 J. B. Lindsey, Amherst, Mass. 
1884 

1885 E. W. Allen, 1923 Biltmore St., Washington, D. C. 

1886 Dr. Winfield Ayres, 616 Madison Ave., New York City. 

1887 F. H. Fowler, Shirley, Mass. 

1888 H. C. Bliss, 14 Mechanic St., Attleborough, Mass. 

1889 C. S. Crocker, 1003 South 25th St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

1890 David Barry, 398 Walnut St., Newtonville, Mass. 

1891 H. T. Shores, 177 Elm St., Northampton, Mass. 

1892 H. M. Thomson, Amherst, Mass. 

1893 F. A. Smith, Turner Hill, Ipswich, Mass. 

1894 S. F. Howard, Amherst, Mass. 

1895 E. A. White, Amherst, Mass. 

1896 A. S. Kinney, South Hadley, Mass. 

1897 C. A. Peters, Amherst, Mass. 
1898 

1899 C. A. Beaman, Rio Piedras, Porto Rico. 

1900 E. K. Atkins, 15 Hubbard Ave., Northampton, Mass. 

1901 J. H. Chickering, Dover, Mass. 

1902 H. L. Knight, 1420 Buchanan St., Washington, D. C. 

1903 G. D. Jones, North Amherst, Mass. 

1904 P. F. Staples, North Grafton, Mass. 

1905 A. D. Taylor, 1101 Tremont Building, Boston, Mass. 

1906 Richard Wellington, Geneva, N. Y. 

1907 Clinton King, 6 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 

1908 J. A. Hyslop, 860 North Mulberry St., Hagerstown, Md. 

1909 O. B. Briggs, 1015 Fidelity Building, Baltimore, Md. 

1910 F. L. Thomas, Amherst, Mass. 

1911 L. M. Johnson, Newtown, Conn. 

1912 F. S. Madison, East Greenwich, R. I. 



SECRETARIES OF ALUMNI ASSOCIATIONS 



Alumni Secretaries Association of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 
Secretary — Ralph J. Watts, 1907, Amherst, Mass. 

Associate Alumni of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 
Secretary — Philip H. Smith, 1897, Amherst, Mass. 

Alumni Club of Massachusetts. 

Clerk — H. Linwood White, 1909, 136 State House, Boston, Mass. 

Connecticut Valley Association of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 
Secretary — Charles L. Brown, 1894, 870 State St., Springfield, Mass. 

Massachusetts Agricultural College Club of New York. 

Secretary— John Ashburton Cutter, 1882, 262 West 77th St., New 
York, N. Y. 

Massachusetts Agricultural College Club of Washington, D. C. 

Secretary — Clarence H. Griffin, 1904, 1864 Park Road, Washington, 
D. C. 

Western Alumni Association of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 
Secretary— Charles A. Tirrell, 1906, 4012 Perry St., Chicago, 111. 

Massachusetts Agricultural College Pacific Coast Alumni Association. 
Secretary — Thomas F. Hunt, 1905, Berkeley, Cal. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 
ADDRESS LIST 



* before the name denotes deceased. 



t denotes not heard from in 1912. 



1871 

E. E. Thompson, Secretary 

Allen, Gideon H., K 2, 176 Court 
St., New Bedford, Mass., 
Accountant and Writer. 

Bassett, Andrew L., Q. T. V., 
352 Decatur St., Brooklyn, 
N. Y. Business address, New 
Pier, 29 East River, N. Y., 
transfer agent Central Vermont 
Railroad Co. 

Birnie, William P., K 2, 34 Stearns 
Terrace, Springfield, Mass., 
Manufacturer. 

Bowker, William H., Concord, 
Mass. Business address, 43 
Chatham St., Boston, Mass., 
President Bowker Fertilizer Co., 
Trustee M. A. C. 

Caswell, Lilley B., Athol, Mass., 
Civil Engineer and Historian. 

Cowles, Homer L., Amherst, Mass., 
Farmer. 

fEllsworth, Emory A., Q.T.V., 356 
Dwight St., Holyoke, Mass., 
Architect and Civil Engineer. 
Fisher, Jabez F., KS, 73 Congress 
St., Fitchburg, Mass., Accoun- 
tant. 

fFuller, George E., Address un- 
known. 

*Hawley, Frank W., died Oct. 28, 
1883 at Belchertown, Mass. 

*Herrick, Frederick St. C, D. G. K., 
died January 19, 1894, at 
Lawrence, Mass. 



1871 

Leonard, George, D. K. G., 30 
Avon Place, Springfield, Mass., 
Lawyer, Clerk of Courts; L. L.B. 

Lyman, Robert W., $ K <£, Q. T. V- 
11 Linden St., Northampton. 
Mass., Lawyer. L. L. B.» 
Boston University, 1878; L. L- 
M., Boston University, 1912. 

*Morse, James H., died June 21, 

1883, at Salem, Mass. 
Nichols, L. A., K 2, 6054 Wood- 
lawn Ave., Chicago, 111., Con- 
sulting Engineer, President 
Chicago Steel Tape Co. 

Norcross, Arthur D., D. G. K., 

Monson, Mass., Retired. 
♦Page, Joel B., D. G. K., died 
August 23, 1902, at Conway, 

Mass. 

Richmond, S. H., Cutler, Dade 
Co., Florida. Business address, 
Box 128, Miami, Florida, Real 
Estate. 

Russell, William D., # K $, D. G. 

K., 353 West 85th St., New 
York City, Manufacturer. 

Smead, Edwin B., Q. T. V., P. O. 
Box 335, Hartford, Conn., 
Principal Watkinson Farm 
School. 

Sparrow, Lewis A., Northboro, 
Mass., Farmer. 

Strickland, George P., D. G. K., 
3852 So. L. St., Tacoma, Wash., 
Loans and Farming. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



1871 

Thompson, Edgar E., 5 Jaques 
Ave., Worcester, Mass., Super- 
vising Principal Worcester 
Schools. 
Tucker, George H., died October 
1, 1899, at Spring Creek, Pa. 

Ware, Willard C, Hamilton, 
Mass., Retired. 

Wheeler, William, $ K 3>, K 2, 
Concord, Mass. Business ad- 
dress, 14 Beacon St., Boston, 
Mass. Consulting Engineer. 
Trustee M. A. C. 
*Whitney, Frank L., D. G. K., 
died July 15, 1912, at Harvard, 
Mass. 

Woolson, George C, Hastings-on- 
Hudson, N. Y. Business ad- 
dress, 1 Madison Ave., New 
York City, Nurseryman. 

NON-GRADUATES 

fB arrows, William, Jr. 

fBell, George H. 

*Blunt, Charles E., died in 1903. 

Brainerd, John Wilson, Palmer, 

Mass. 
fBreck, Webster. 

Brown, Clarence E., 53 Center St., 
Northampton, Mass., Electro- 
plater. 

*Cary, William H., died about 1875. 

fCasey, Michael F. 

Cole, Daniel P., Springfield, Mass., 
Wholesale Paper Dealer. 

Crocker, Loring, Jr., 4 W. Cedar 
St., Boston, Mass., Broker. 

Eastman, George H., Storm Lake, 
Iowa, Accountant. 

Graves, George G., Amherst, Mass. 

Greene, William H., 418 Jefferson 
Ave., Pomona, Cal., Retired. 

Gunn, Charles B., 1002 N. Corona 
St., Colorado Springs, Colo., 
Passenger Conductor. 

fHall, Frederick A. 



1872 

fHall, Lemuel W. 

fHowland, Charles M. 

fHubbard, Frank A. 

fKelleher, David W. 
King, Albert, 10 Belmont St., 
Taunton, Mass., Cashier, Taunt- 
on Ice Company. 

Luther, Gardiner C, 12 Sheldon 
St., Providence, R. I., Con- 
tractor. 

Miller, Henry Lewis, 12 Grinnell 
St., Greenfield, Mass., Retired. 

Nash, Edwin D., Bocas del Toro, 
Panama. 

Rankin, Austin B., Woonsocket, 

R. I., Wholesale Beef and 

Provision Dealer. 

*Slattery, William, Jr., died July 

22, 1899, at Northampton, Mass. 

Southwick, Alonzo, L., Blackstone, 

Mass. 

Swift, George A., 21 Craft St., 

Waltham, Mass., Retired. 
*Wheeler, Charles A., died January, 
1888, at Ouray, Colo. 

f Williams, Henry. 

1872 

F. E. Kimball, Secretary 

Bell, Burleigh C, D. G. K., 
289 8th St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Brett, William F., D. G. K., 40 
Warren St., Dorchester, Mass., 
Retired. 

Clark, John W., Q. T. V., North 
Hadley Mass., Fruit Grower. 

Cowles, Frank C, 31 Grand St., 
Worcester, Mass., Civil Engin- 
eer. 

*Cutter, John C, D. G. K., died 
February 2, 1909, at Worcester, 
Mass. 

♦Dyer, Edward N., died March 
17, 1891, at Holliston, Mass. 

*Easterbrook, Isaac H. died May 
27, 1901, at Dudley, Mass. 



ADDRESS LIST 



1872 

Fiske, Edward R., Q. T. V., 
234 West Chelton Ave., German- 
town, Pa. Business address, 
625 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, 
Pa., Manufacturer. 

Flagg, Charles O., Q. T. V., 

Hardwick, Mass., Supt. Page 

Demonstration Farms. 
Grover, Richard B., West 

Newbury, Mass., Clergyman. 

Andover Theological Seminary, 

1881. 
♦Holmes, Lemuel Le B., Q. T. V., 

died August 4, 1897, at Matta- 

poisett, Mass. 

Howe, Edward G., 10233 So. Wood 
St., Chicago, 111., Teacher in 
Chicago High School. 

Kimball, Francis E., 8 John St., 
Worcester, Mass., Accountant. 

fLivermore, R. W., Q. T. V., 

Red Springs, N. C. 
♦Mackie, George, Q. T. V., died 
August 31, 1906, at Attleboro, 
Mass. 

Maynard, Samuel T., Northboro, 
Mass., Fruit grower and Farmer. 

Morey, Herbert E., 34 Hillside 
Ave., Maiden, Mass. Business 
address, 41 Washington St., 
Boston, Mass., Numismatist and 
Philatelist. 

*Peabody, William R., Q. T. V., 
died June 28, 1908, at St. Louis, 
Mo. 

♦Salisbury, Frank B., D. G. K., 
died 1895, at Mashonaland, 
Africa. 

Shaw, Elliot D., 130 Firglade Ave. 
Business address, 36 Main St., 
Springfield, Mass., Real Estate. 

Snow, George H., Leominster, 
Mass., Farmer. 

*Somers, Frederick M., Q. T. V., 
died February 2, 1894, at 
Southampton, Eng. 

Thompson, Samuel C, $ K <£, 
3> 2 K, 2348 Aqueduct Ave., 
New York City, Civil Engineer. 



1872 

*Wells, Henry, Q. T. V., died 
September 19, 1907, at James- 
town, R. I. 

Whitney, William C, Q. T. V., 
2574 4th Ave., South. Business 
address, 313 Nicollet Ave., 
Minneapolis, Minn., Architect. 



NON-GRADUATES 

Bancroft, Jonathan F., R. F. D. 
No. 2, Nashua, N. H., Farmer. 

Barber, Strong Hayden, Windsor, 
Conm, Real Estate. 

Barker, Charles A., Jr., 2 Hubbard 
St., Concord, Mass. 

Brainerd, John W., Palmer, Mass., 
Builder. 

Bullard, William E., Larchmont, 
N. Y., Physician. 

fBlood, Alonzo Hutchinson. 
fChapman, Edward Brown. 
Cowls, Walter Dickinson, North 

Amherst, Mass. Farmer. 
Harrington, Frank Warner, Box 
567, Amherst, Mass., Farmer, 
t Kingman, William Hart. 
fLester, Frank Harris. 

Lockey, John Morse, 69 West St., 

Leominster, Mass., Piano Case 

Manufacturer. 
Morris, Frederick William, 542 

Fifth Ave., New York City, 

Bookseller. 
fNash, Arthur Henry. 
Ober, Frederick Albion, Anderson 

St., Hackensack, N. J., Real 

Estate and Broker. 
fPenhallow, Charles Lowell. 
Swazey, Walter West, 25 Harrison 

Ave., Springfield, Mass. Home 

address, 43 Sherman St., Dentist 
Thomas, George Hutchins, 

R. F. D., No. 1, Leonard 

Bridge, Conn., Farmer. 

f Wills, John Wheelwright. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



1873 

C. Wellington, Secretary 

fEldred, Frederick C, Sandwich, 
Mass., Cranberry Grower. 

Leland, Walter S., D. G. K., 
Concord Junction, Mass., Officer 
in Massachusetts Reformatory. 

*Lyman, Asahel H., D. G. K., died 
January 16, 1896, at Manistee, 
Mich. 

Mills, George W., 60 Salem St., 
Medford, Mass., Physician. 
M. D., Harvard. 

Minor, John B., $ K $, Q. T. V., 
New Britain, Conn., Manufac- 
turer. 

*Penhallow, David P., Q. T. V., 
died at sea, October, 1910. 

*Renshaw, James B., Deceased. 

fSimpson, Henry B., Q. T. V., 

902 Pennsylvania Ave., N. W., 

Washington, D. C. 

Wakefield, Albert T., Sheffield, 
Mass., Physician. M. D., 
Jefferson Medical College, 1878. 

Warner, Seth S., K 2, Florence, 

Mass., Farmer. 
fWebb, James, H., $ K 3>, K 2, 
Hampden, Conn. Business 
address, 42 Church St., New 
Haven, Conn., Lawyer. 

Instructor in Yale University 
Law School; L. L. B., Yale, 1877. 

Wellington, Charles, $ K $, K 2, 
Amherst, Mass., Professor of 
Chemistry, M. A. C. Ph. D., 
Gottingen, Germany, 1885. 

fWood, Frank W., Address 
unknown. 

NON-GRADUATES 

*Avery, Frank Rhodes, died June 2, 
1886. 

f Baker, Frederick William. 
Barrows, Fletcher Kneeland, 21 
High St., Brattleboro, Vt., Presi- 
dent Brattleboro Savings Bank. 

fCarter, Herbert Mason. 



1874 

fChilds, William F. 
Clark, William J., 113 Franklin 
Ave., Salem, Ohio, Manufac- 
turer. 

Cleland, William F., 95 West 
Central St., Natick, Mass., 
Merchant. 

Copp, Belton Allyn, Groton, 
Conn., Bank President. 

Flower, Archibald D., 20 Orchard 
St., Greenfield, Mass., Lawyer. 
fFrisbie, George B. 
fFurness, George A. 
fGarrett, William E. 

Healey, George Clifford, 

Hampton Falls, N. H., Farmer. 

f Johns, Frederick D. 

fLathrop, Joseph D. 

jLovell, Frank Kendall. 

jMines, William Wales. 

fPeabody, William R. 

f Rowland, Charles W. 
Sanderson, Robert W., 573 Dwight 
St. Home Address, 136 Lincoln 
St., Holyoke, Mass. Grocer. 

fSmith, Jasper B. 
Warriner, Alfred Allen, Warren, 
Mass. Farmer. 

1874 

D. G. Hitchcock, Secretary 

Benedict, John M., D. G. K., 
Woodbury, Conn. M. D., Uni- 
versity of the City of New York, 
1882. Retired. 
jBlanchard, William H., Address 
unknown. 

Chandler, Edward P., D. G. K., 
Rogue River, Ore., Fruit Grower. 

*Curtis, Woolfred F., died Novem- 
ber 18, 1878, at Westminster, 
Mass. 

*Dickinson, Asa W., D. G. K., 
died November 8, 1899, at 
Easton, Pa. 



ADDRESS LIST 



1874 

Hitchcock, Daniel G., Warren, 

Mass., Insurance and Real 

Estate. 
fHobbs, John A., Address unknown. 
Libbey, Edgar H., $K$, Union 

Oil Building, Los Angeles, Cal., 

Agricultural Engineer. 

*Lyman, Henry, died January 19, 

1879, at Middlefield, Conn. 
Montague, Arthur H., South 
Hadley, Mass., Farmer. 

*Phelps, Henry L., died March 3, 
1900, at West Springfield, Mass. 

*Smith, Frank S., D. G. K., died 
December 24, 1899, at Cleve- 
land, Ohio. 
Wocdman, Edward E., $ K 3>, 
Danvers, Mass., Florist. 

Zeller, Harrie McK, 910 Cedar St., 
R. F. D. No. 3, Hagerstown, 
Md., Fruit Grower and Gar- 
dener. 

NON-GRADUATES 

Adams, Fred Edgar, 350 Fulton 
St., Brooklyn, N. Y. Home 
address, 1215 Herkimer St., 
Lumber Dealer. 

Alexander, Edward P., Jackson- 
ville, 111., Insurance. 

Barstow, William Hale, 35 Con- 
gress St., Boston, Mass. Home 
address, 35 College Ave., Med- 
ford. Treasurer American 
Loom Fixtures Company. 
fBriggs, Louis Willard. 

Clark, Wallis Olwyn, c/o Ameri- 
can Legation, Guatemala, C. A. 
Retired Major, U. S. A. 

fClark, William Avery. 

fDoubleday, Henry M. 

fDoubleday, William H. 

fDuncan, George Adams. 

fFisk, Charles Abbott. 

fFrench, John Leavitt. 

Gillett, Edward, Southwick, Mass., 
Nurseryman. 



1875 

f Jones, Arthur Clifford. 

*Lyman, William, died December 
20, 1896, at Middlefield, Conn. 

tMillard, David Knox. 

tMitchell, William H. 

fMoody, George Frederick. 

fOuld, Remus. 

tPearce, Walter Sloan. 

tShaw, Charles Jacob. 
Smith, James Metcalf, 11 South 
Main St., Providence, R. I. 
Home address, 7 Parkis Ave. 
Steam and Water Heating Fac- 
tory Superintendent. 

Strain, William, Mount Carmel 
Conn. 

fTowne, Frank Augustus. 

f Tucker, Charles E. 

fWood, Frank Warren. 
Zeller, Bruce Scott, 120 W.Wash- 
ington St., Hagerstown, Md. 
Home address, 502 Summit Ave. 
Real Estate. 

fZeller, William M. 



1875 

Madison Bunker, Secretary 

Barrett, Joseph F., * K $, $ 2 K, 

60 Trinity Place, New York 
City, Fertilizer Business. 

Barri, John A., 346 Maple St., 
Springfield, Mass. Business 
address, Berkshire Mills, Bridge- 
port, Conn. Grain and Coal 
Dealer. 

Bragg, Everett B., Q. T. V., 1838 
Chicago Ave., Evanston, 111. 
Business address, 112 West 
Adams St., Chicago, 111. Vice- 
President General Chemical Co. 

Brooks, William P,$K<I>,$2K. 
Amherst, Mass., Director Mass. 
Agricultural ExperimentStation. 
Ph. D., Frederichs University, 
at Halle, Germany. 



10 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



1875 

Bunker, Madison, Newton, Mass., 
Veterinary Surgeon. D. V. S., 
American Veterinary College, 
New York, 1881. 

fCallender, Thomas R., D. G. K., 

Northfield, Mass., Farmer. 
Campbell, Frederick G,$2K, 
Putney, Vt., Farmer. 

Carruth, Herbert S., D. G. K., 

Amherst, Mass., Retired. 
*Clark, Zenos Y., * 2 K, died June 

4, 1889, at Amherst, Mass. 
*Clay, Jabez W., $ 2 K, died 

October 1, 1880, at New York 

City. 

Dodge, George R., Q. T. V., 
South Hamilton, Mass., Farmer. 

Hague, Henry, <i> 2 K, 695 South- 
bridge St., Worcester, Mass. 
Clergyman. 

Harwood, Peter M. $ 2 K, Barre, 
Mass. Business address, Room 
136, State House, Boston, Mass. 
General Agent, Mass. Dairy 
Bureau. 

*Knapp, Walter H., $ K $, died 
April 10, 1911, at Newtonville, 

Mass. 

Lee, Lauren K., 631 St. Anthony 
Ave. Business address, 205-206 
Dispatch Building, St. Paul, 
Minn. Advertising Agent. 

Miles, George M., 28 Lake St., 
Miles City, Mont. Banker 
and Merchant. 

Otis, Harry P., K 2, Florence, 
Mass., Manufacturer. 

Rice, Frank H., 710 Madison St. 
Business address, 1444 Broad- 
way, Oakland, Cal., Accountant. 

South wick, Andre A., $ 2 K, 355 

Tremont St., Taunton, Mass., 
Farmer. 

Winchester, John F., Q. T. V., 
39 East Haverhill St., Lawrence, 
Mass., Veterinarian. D. V. S., 
American Veterinary College, 
New York, 1878. 



1875 



NON-GRADUATES 



fAndrae, George C. 
fAshton, John. 

Babbitt, George Henry, 340 Grove 
St., Chicopee Falls, Mass., with 
Phelps Publishing Co., Spring- 
field. 

fChase, Edmund Taylor. 

fDeland, Thomas James. 

fDix, James Quincy. 

fEllis, Granville, Alden. 

fFrothingham, Thomas G. 

fGibbs, Charles F. 

fHatch, George Stanley. 

fHolmes, Harry Hawley. 

fjudkins, Arthur M. 

Jackson, Henry S., 516 Park Ave., 
East Orange, N. J., Retired.] 

Kinsman, Willard F., Hayslope 
Farm, Ipswich, Mass., Farmer. 

fMerrill, James C. 
fMerrill, Nathaniel P. 
f Parker, Francis G. 

Peabody, Cecil H., 293 Common- 
wealth Ave., Boston, Mass., 
Professor of Naval and Marine 
Engineering. 

fPlatt, William D. 
fPlayer, Harry H. 

*Reed, Freemont Sumner, died 
July 4, 1879, at South Wey- 
mouth, Mass. 

fRotch, Caleb Lamb. 
fSnow, Laban. 

Stearns, Richard Sprague, 25 
Exchange Bldg., Boston, Mass. 
*Taylor, Ralph Ives, Deceased, 
f Thomas. John Louis. 
fVaill, William Henry. 
fWeeks, Herman F. 
fYouchi, Geamon. 



ADDRESS LIST 



11 



1876 

C. Fred Deuel, Secretary 
fBagley, David A., Address un- 
known. 

Bellamy, John, D. G. K., West 

Newton, Mass. Business ad- 
dress, 134 Pearl St., Boston, 
Mass. Bookkeeper. 

Chickering, Darius O., Enfield, 

Mass. Farmer. 
Deuel, C. Fred, <*> K $, Q. T. V., 

Amherst, Mass., Druggist. 
*Guild, George W., Q. T. V., died 
May 8, 1903, at Jamaica Plain, 
Mass. 
fHawley, Joseph M., D. G. K., 
Address unknown. 

*Kendall, Hiram, D. G. K., died 
1911, at East Greenwich, R. I. 

Ladd, Thomas H., Address un- 
known. 

fMcConnell, Charles W., K 2, 
171 Fremont St., Boston, 'Mass., 
Dentist. D. D. S., Philadelphia 
Dental College, 1880. 
Macleod, William A., $ K <f>, D. 
G. K., Westwood, Mass. Busi- 
ness address, 350 Tremont Bldg., 
Boston, Mass., Lawyer. 

L. L. B., Boston University. 

fMann, George H., 68 Stoughton 
Ave.,Readville, Mass., Engineer. 

Martin, William E., Sioux Falls, 
S. D., Bookkeeper. 

Parker, George A., $ K <£>, $SK, 
100 Blue Hills Ave. Business 
address, 49 Pearl St., Hartford, 
Conn., Supt. of Parks; Advisory 
City Forester of Hartford. 

Parker, George L., 807 Washington 
St., Dorchester, Mass., Florist, 
t Phelps, Charles H., Address un- 
known. 

Porter, William H., $ 2 K, Aga- 

wam, Mass., Farmer. 
Potter, William S., D. G. K., 

920 State St. Business address, 

4 Wallace Bldg., Lafayette, Ind. 

Lawyer and Banker. 



1876 

Root, Joseph E., $ 2 K, 67 Pearl 
St., Hartford, Conn., Physician 
and Surgeon. M. D., College 
of Physicians and Surgeons,. 
New York, 1883. 

Sears, John M., Ashfield, Mass.,. 
Farmer. 

*Smith, Thomas E., D. G. K., 
died September 20, 1901, at 
West Chesterfield, Mass. 

*Taft, Cyrus A., died February 7, 
1908, at Whitinsville, Mass. 

*Urner, George P., D. G. K., 

died April ,1897, at Wesley,. 

Mont. 
*Wetmore, Howard G., D. G. K., 

died April 27, 1906, at New 

York City. 
*Williams, John E., died January 

18, 1890, at Amherst, Mass. 

NON-GRADUATES 

fDePew, Richard Mather. 
fEllis, Edward Story, 
f Graves, Louis Bertrand. 
Jefts, Melvin Willard, Ashby, 

Mass., Farmer. 
Judd, Charles A., South Hadley 
Falls, Mass., Farmer. 

Lawton, Charles F., 12 Maple 

View Terrace, New Bedford, 

Mass., Supt. of Streets; City 

Forester. 

Leach, Frank Harvey, 728 Main- 

St., Worcester, Mass. 
fNaito, Saitaro. 
fParker, Edward Herbert. 

*Perkins, William H., died in 1897,. 
at Watertown, Mass. 

fPreston, Edward George. 

Robinson, John Albert, 11 Marion 
Road, Arlington, Mass., Retired.. 

fRogers, Mulford T. 
fSanger, Frank Hyde. 
Slade, Denison Rogers, Centre- 
Harbor, N. H., Farmer. 



12 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



1877 

Spooner, Frank iidams, 104 Mount 
Auburn St., Watertown, Mass., 
Sales Manager. 

Tucker, Fred Herman, 141 Essex 
St., Boston, Mass. Home ad- 
dress, 206 Church St., Newton. 
Wholesale Dry Goods. 

1877 

Atherton Clark, Secretary 

Benson, David H., Q. T. V., 
419 Georgia St., Jacksonville, 
Fla. 

fBrewer, Charles, Address unknown. 

Clark, Atherton, $ K 3>, K 2, 231 

Waverly Ave., Newton, Mass. 

Business address, 140 Tremont 

St., Boston, Mass., Merchant. 

* Dickinson, Walter M. Killed at 

Battle of El Caney, 1898. 
*Hibbard, Joseph R., died June 17, 
1899, at Stoughton, Wis. 
Howe, Waldo V., Q. T. V., 

Newburyport, Mass., Farmer. 
Mills, James K., K 2, Amherst, 
Mass., Photographer. 

tNye, George F., D.G.K., 420 East 
42d St., Chicago, 111. 

*Parker, Henry F., died December 
21, 1897, at Brooklyn, N. Y. 

tPorto, Raymundo M. Da, $2K, 
Address unknown. 

*Southmayd, John E., * 2 K, died 
December 11, 1878, at Minne- 
apolis, Minn. 

fWyman, Joseph, 347 Massachusetts 
Ave., Arlington, Mass., Real 
Estate. 

NON-GRADUATES 

*Ball, Gilman K., died February, 
1905. 

Goodrich, Wilbur F., 324 Kimball 
Bldg., Boston, Mass. Home 
address, 10 Gibbens St., Somer- 
ville, Civil Engineer. 

•Gunn, William B., Southampton, 
Mass., Farmer. 



1878 

fMoore, Frank Lester. 
fPaige, Harry Cruise. 
fPalmer, Frank Waldo. 

Pixley, Martin Shaw, 38 Sumner 
Ave., Springfield, Mass., Janitor. 
fSmith, Frank Leland. 
fSouthworth, Charles H. 
Urner, Frank Gordon, 173-175 
Chambers St., New York City, 
Home address, Farm wood, N. J. 
Editor. 

fWilson, Alvin Robert. 
fWayesugi, Tall Katuyoshi. 

1878 

C. O. Lovell, Secretary 

Baker, David E., $ 2 K, 227 
Walnut St., Newtonville, Mass., 
Physician. M. D., Harvard. 

*Boutwell, W. L. died September 
28, 1906, at Northampton, Mass. 
Brigham, Arthur A., $ 2 K, Brook- 
ings, S. D., Principal South 
Dakota, School of Agriculture. 
Ph. D., Gottingen, Germany, 
1896. 

*Choate, Edward C, Q. T. V., died 
January 18, 1905, at Southboro, 
Mass. 

*Coburn, Charles F., Q. T. V., died 
December 26, 1901, at Lowell, 

Mass. 

Foot, Sanford D., Q. T. V., 
231 West 70th St., New York 
City, Manufacturer. 

Hall, Josiah N, * K <i>, $ 2 K, 1344 
Elizabeth St. Business address, 
452 Metropolitan Bldg., Denver, 
Colo. M. D., Harvard. 

Howe, Charles S., $K<i>,<i>2K, 11125 
Bellflower Road, Cleveland, O., 
President Case School of Applied 
Science. Ph. D., Wooster Uni- 
versity, 1887. D. Sc., Armour 
Institute, 1905; L. L. D., Mt. 
Union College, 1908. 



ADDRESS LIST 



13 



1878 

Hubbard, Henry F., Q. T. V., 
37 Elm Grove Ave., Providence, 
R. I. Business address, 26 
Custom House St., Providence, 
R. I., Tea Importer. 

Hunt,' John F., 302 Ferry St., 
Maiden, Mass. Business address 
27 State St., Boston, Mass., 
Building Superintendent. 

Lovell, Charles O., Q. T. V., 
Watertown, Mass. Business 
address, 5 Bromfield St., Boston, 
Mass., Manufacturer. 

Lyman, Charles E., Middlefield, 

Mass., Farmer. 
fMyrick, Lockwood, Hommonton, 

N. J., Fruit Grower. 
fOsgood, Frederick H., Q. T. V., 

50 Village St., Boston, Mass. 

*Spofford, Amos L. $2K, died in 

1911. 
Stockbridge, Horace E., K 2, 20 
South Forsythe St., Atlanta, Ga., 
Editor Southern Ruralist, Ph. D. 

Tuckerman, Frederick, Q. T. V., 
Amherst, Mass., Anatomist. 
M. D., Harvard, 1882; M. A. 
and Ph. D., University of 
Heidelberg, Germany, 1894. 

Washburn, John H., K 2, Farm 
School, Pa., Director National 
Farm School. Ph. D., Gottin- 
gen, Germany. 

Woodbury, Rufus P. Q. T. V., 
Stock Yard Station, Kansas 
City, Mo., Secretary Kansas 
City Live Stock Exchange. 

NON-GRADUATES 

fAllen, Mathew Joseph. 
Carneiro, Manuel Dias. 
fCollum, George Newell. 
*Cooley, Silas Rose, died November 

13, 1901. 
•(■Humphrey, George E. 
Loomis, Francis Eugene, Lincoln 
Ave., Amherst, Mass., Farmer. 



1879 

Morey, Guy, 63 Market St., 
Lowell, Mass. Home ad- 
dress, 46 Mt. Washington St., 
Assistant Treasurer. 

Nims, Luther, Mt. Holly, N. C., 
Farmer and Manufacturer. 

Taylor, Henry Morgan, 6 Beacon 
St., Boston, Mass. Home ad- 
dress, 163 Tappan St., Brookline r 
Real Estate. 



1879 

R. W. Swan, Secretary 

Dickinson, Richard S., D. G. K,, 
Columbus, Neb., Banker. 

*Green, Samuel B., K 2, died July 
11, 1910, at St. Anthony Park, 
Minn. 

fRudolph, Charles, Q. T. V., 
Address unknown. 

Sherman, Walter A., D. G. K., 
214 Pawtucket St. Business 
address, 340 Central St., Lowell, 
Mass., Veterinary Surgeon. D. 
V. S., American Veterinary 
College, 1883; M. D., Long 
Island Medical College. 

Smith, George P., K 2, Sunderland, 
Mass., Farmer. 

fSwan, Roscoe W., D. G. K.,M. D., 
41 Pleasant St., Worcester, 
Mass., Physician. 
Waldron, Hiram E. B., Q. T. V., 
112 Highland St., Hyde Park, 
Mass. ,Real Estate and Insurance. 

NON-GRADUATES 

fBaker, Martin. 

Bass, Edward Little, Bethel, Vt., 
Lumber dealer. 

Campbell, Charles H., 510 Fourth 
Ave., N., Great Falls, Mont., 
Loans and Land Investments. 

Chittenden, Edgar W., Bridgeport, 
Conn., Fertilizer Business. 

fCook, Roland C. 



14 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



1:880 

Howard, Joseph C, West Bridge- 
water, Mass. 
fHunt, Elisha Hubbard. 
fKnox, Reuben. 
fLincoln, Joseph G. 
f Palmer, Coddington B. 
fWadley, George Dole. 

1880 

A. L. Fowler, Secretary. 

Fowler, Alvan L., $ 2 K, Haddon- 
field, N. J. Business address, 
413 P. O. Bldg., Philadelphia, 
Pa. National Bank Examiner. 
•fGladwin, Frederick E., $ 2 K, Box 
190, Burbank, Cal. 

Lee, William G., D. G. K., 1408 
Twelfth St. Business address, 
Forum Bldg., Sacramento, Cal. 
Draftsman. 
fMcQueen, Charles M., $SK, 
address unknown. 

Parker, William C, $2K, 158 
Huntington Ave. Business ad- 
dress, 294 Washington St., Bos- 
ton, Mass. L. L. B. Lawyer. 

i-Ripley, George A., Q. T. V., 
Greendale, Mass., Market Gar- 
dener. 

Stone, Almon H., Wareham, Mass. 
Farmer. 

NON-GRADUATES 

fAtwood, Horace Wood. 
Bristol, Edwin F., Ascutneyville, 
Vt., Farmer. 

t Carey, Willis Washburn. 

tEndicott, George. 
Hall, Alfred S., 312 Maiden St., 
Revere, Mass., Market Gar- 
dener. 

-f Mattocks, Euao Edward. 
-[Pease, Charles Truman. 
1" Stewart, William Clark. 



1881 

Townsley, Herbert M., Canton, 
N. Y., Civil Engineer. 

t Warner, William E. 

tWing, Edgar Russell. 

tWood, Lewis. 

Zabriskie, Frank H., Greenfield, 
Mass., Physician. 

1881 

J. L. Hills, Secretary 

Bowman, Charles A., C. S. C, 
725 Astrom Ave., Syracuse, 
N. Y. Business address, 514 
Dillaye Bldg., Syracuse, N. Y. 
Civil Engineer. 

*Boynton, Charles E., M. D., died 
at Los Banos, Cal. 

tCarr, W. Frank, Q. T. V., 116 
Thirty-second St., Milwaukee, 
Wis., Manufacturer and Engin- 
eer. C. E. Massachusetts In- 
stitute of Technology, 1884. 
Chapin, Henry E., A 2 $, 49 
Lefferts Ave., Richmond Hill, 
New York City, Teacher of 
Biology and Physiology, M. Sc, 
Michigan Agricultural College, 
1893; D. Sc, McKendree Col- 
lege, 1908. 

Fairfield, Frank H., Q. T. V., 
153 Fourth Ave., East Orange, 
N. J., Chemist. 
*Flint, Charles L., Q. T. V., died 
June, 1904. 

*Hashiguchi, Boonzo, D. G. K., 
died August 12, 1903, at Tokio, 
Japan. 

Hills, Joseph L., <J> K <f>, K 2, 

59 North Prospect St., Burling- 
ton, Vt., Dean, Department of 
Agriculture, University of Ver- 
mont, Director Vermont Agri- 
cultural Experiment Station. 
D. Sc, Rutgers College. 

Howe, Elmer D.,$2K, Marlboro, 
Mass., Dairy Farmer, Trustee 
M. A. C. 



ADDRESS LIST 



15 



1881 

Peters, Austin, Q. T. V., Harvard, 
Mass., Farmer. D. V. S., Amer- 
ican Veterinary College, New 
York, 1883; M. R. C. V. S., 
London, England. 

Rawson, Edward B., D. G. K., 
11 Clifton Place, Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Business address, 226 East 16th 
St., New York City. Supt. 
Friends' School. Pd. M., New 
York University. 

Smith, Hiram F. M., 115 South 
Main St., Orange, Mass., Phys- 
ician. M. D., Harvard, 1885. 
t Spalding, Abel W. C. S. C, 422 
Globe Block, Seattle, Wash., 
Architect. 

Taylor, Frederick P., D. G. K., 

Athens, Tenn., Farmer. 
*Warner, Clarence D., D. G. K., 
died October 16, 1905, at 
Kimmswick, Mo. 

*Whittaker, Arthur, D. G. K., died 
March, 1906, at Needham,Mass. 
*Wilcox, Henry H., D. G. K., died 
January 11, 1899, at Honolulu. 
Young, Charles E., * 2 K, Colum- 
bia, S. C, Physician. M. D., 
University of the City of New 
York, 1882. 



NON-GRADUATES 

Brooks, William Cummings, 
Freedom, N. H., Civil Engin- 
eer and Farmer. 

Clark, Wallae V., Maiden, Mass 
Postal Superintendent. 

tCourtney, Matthew. 

tHall, Albert C. 

tHobbs, John Folsom. 

*Howe, Winslow Brigham, died 

in 1911. 
fMcKanna, James P. 
Perry, Alfred Dwight, 154 Vernon 

St., Worcester, Mass., Milk 

Dealer. 



1882 

Sattler, Herman C, Norfolk, Neb., 
Dealer in Agricultural Imple- 
ments. 

Smith, BenjaminS., 32 Nassau 
St., New York, City. 

Smith, John Leland, Barre, 
Mass., Farmer. 
tWolfe, Walter Madson. 

Wood, Wilbur. E. 2803 4th Ave., 
Spokane, Wash. 



1882 

G. D. Howe, Secretary 

Allen, Francis, S. C. S. C, 221 Main 
St., Nashua, N. H., Veterinary 
Surgeon. D. V. S., American 
Veterinary College, New York 
1884; M. D., New York Uni- 
versity, 1886. 

Aplin, George T., Q. T. V., 
East Putney, Vt., Farmer. 

Beach, C. Edward, D. G. K., 
West Hartford, Conn., Farmer. 

*Bingham, Eugene P., C. S. C, 
died March 31, 1904, at Los 
Angeles, Cal. 
Bishop, William H., $SK, Farm 
School, Pa., Professor of Agri- 
culture, National Farm School. 

*Brodt, Harry S., Q. T. V., died 
December, 1906, at Rawlins, 
Wyo. 

Chandler, Everett S., C. S. C, 
North Judson, Ind., R. F. D. 
No. 3, Clergyman and Farmer. 
LL. B., Harvard, 1885; B. D., 
Chicago Theological Seminary, 
1890. 

Cooper, James W., D. G. K., 
142 Court St., Plymouth, Mass., 
Pharmacist. 

Cutter, John A., $ 2 K, 262 West 
77th St., New York City, Phy- 
sician. M. D., Albany Medical 
College, 1886. 



16 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



1882 

Damon, Samuel C, C. S. C, 
Kingston, R. I., Assistant in 
Agronomy, Rhode Island Agri- 
cultural Experiment Station. 
*Floyd, Charles W., died October 
10, 1883, at Dorchester, Mass. 

Goodale, David, Q. T. V., Marl- 
boro, Mass., Farmer. 

Hillman, Charles D., $ 2 K, Wat- 
sonville, Cal., R. F. D., No. 2, 
Nurseryman. 
*Howard, Joseph H., died February 
13, 1889, at Minnsela, S. D. 

Howe, George D., 38 Whittier 
Ave., Springfield, Mass., Sales- 
man. 

Jones, Frank W., Q. T. V., 
Norwell, Mass. Business ad- 
dress, Assinippi, Mass. Teacher. 

Kingman, Morris B., Amherst, 
Mass., Florist. 

Kinney, Burton A., $ 2 K, 98 
Bleachery St., Lowell, Mass. 
Business address, 94 Essex St., 
Boston, Mass. Manufacturer. 

May, Frederick G., $ 2 K, Groton, 
Mass., Farmer. 

Morse, William A., Q. T. V., 
15 Auburn St., Melrose High- 
lands, Mass. Business address, 
111 Devonshire St., Boston, 
Mass., Secretary. 

Myrick, Herbert, 115 Bowdoin St. 
Business address, Myrick Bldg., 
Springfield, Mass., Editor, 
Author, and Publisher. 

Paige, James B., $ K $, Q. T. V., 

Amherst, Mass., Professor of 
Veterinary Science, Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College, Vet- 
erinarian, Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural Experiment Station. 
D. V. S., McGill University, 
11 



Perkins, Dana E., 7 Salem St. 
Business address, Medford Sq., 
Medford, Mass. Civil Engineer 



1882 

Plumb, Charles S., Q. T. V., 
1980 Indianola Ave., Columbus, 
O., Professor of Animal Hus- 
bandry, Ohio State University. 

Shiverick, Asa F., 1310 Madison 
Park. Business address 33, 
Wabash Ave., Chicago, 111., 
Merchant. 

Stone, Winthrop E., C. S C, 
146 North Grant St. West 
Lafayette, Ind., President Pur- 
due University. Ph. D., Gott- 
ingen, Germany, 1888; LL. D., 
Michigan Agricultural College. 
1907. 

Taft, Levi R., $ K <t>, C. S. C, 

Agricultural College, East Lan- 
sing, Mich., State Superintend- 
ent of Farmers' Institute. 
Taylor, Alfred H., D. G. K., 
Caldwell, Idaho, Farmer. 
*Thurston, Wilbur H., died August, 
1900, at Cape Nome, Alaska. 
Wilder, John E., <£ K 3>, K 2, 
1211 Hinman Ave., Evanston, 
111. Business address, 226-228 
Lake St., Chicago, 111., Tanner 
and Leather Merchant; Trustee 
Beloit College. 

Williams, James S., Q. T. V., 
Glastonbury, Ct., Manufacturer. 

Windsor, Joseph L., La Grange, 
111. Business address, 922 State 
Life Bldg., Indianapolis, Ind., 
Insurance and Engineering. 



NON-GRADUATES 

tAbercrombie, Fred Norman. 
Allen, George Dickinson.Vacaville, 
Cal., Fruit Grower. 

IBrown, Charles Henry. 

tCasparian, Gregory. 

tChandler, Willard M., Clergyman. 

tChase, Harry Kirk. 
Chipman, Frank E., 83-91 Francis 
St., Boston, Mass., Treasurer 
Boston Book Company. 



ADDRESS LIST 



17 



1882 

Clarke, Henry Little, Andover, 
Mass., Physician. 

*Clay, Cassius Morey, Deceased. 

Cochran, Robert A., Maysville, 

Ky., Manufacturer. 
Comins, William H., Hadley, 

Mass., Farmer. 

Crafts, George Eben, Bangor, Me., 
Paper Manufacturer. 

tCurrier, George Francis. 

fDelano, Julio Joaquin. 

Deuel, Frank Dennis, Amherst, 

Mass. 

tDoyle, John J. 
fDutton, Charles K. 
fFish, Charles Sumner. 
Gowdy, Harry Morgan, Westfield, 

Mass. 
Harris, Louis Lincoln, Greenland, 
N. H., Clergyman. 
fHarris, Richard Brown. 

Hill, Charles Henry, 229 Chestnut 

St., Holyoke, Mass., Engineer. 
Holmes, Samuel Judd, 188 Park 

St., Montclair, N. J., Real 

Estate. 
Jackson, Andrew, Napa Soda 

Springs, Cal. 
* Johnson, Frank Prescott, died 

October 30, 1903. 

Jones, Edward Spaulding, 116 Main 

St., Worcester, Mass. Home 

address, 5 Green Lane. 
Jones, Nathaniel Nelson, 817 Old 

South Bldg., Boston, Mass. 

Home address, 76 High St., 

Newburyport, Mass., Lawyer. 
Joyner, Frank Hall, 310 Palmetto 

Drive, Alhambra, Cal., Civil 

Engineer. 
Kenfield, Charles Robert, Holyoke, 

Mass. 
Knowles, William Francis, Jr., 

220 Clarendon St., Boston, 

Mass. Physician. 
tKrauss, Alonzo Augustus. 
2 



1883 

*Leonard, Arthur, died March 23, 
1904. 

Lindsay, Frank B., Philmont, 
N. Y., Attorney. 
tLivermore, Nathaniel L. 

Luques, Edward C, 159 Main St., 
Biddeford, Me. 

tManton, William James. 

Meade, William George, Spring- 
field, Mass. 

*Miller, Willie Smith, Deceased. 

Parsons, Howard Albert, North 
Amherst, Mass., Farmer, 
f Perkins, Charles B. 
fPlatt, John Cheney. 

Putnam, Henry A., 6 Rock Ave., 
Worcester, Mass., Builder. 
tRhodes, William H. 
tSmith, Herman Kellogg. 

* Wheeler, Henry Lewis, died at 

Great Barrington, Mass. 
tWheelock, Victor L. 

Willard, Daniel, Belvedere Hotel, 
Baltimore, Md., President Bal- 
timore & Ohio R. R. 
tWilmarth, Dr. Frederick A. 



1883 

J. B. Lindsey, Secretary. 

fBagley, Sidney C, <*> 2 K, 230 

Tremont St., Melrose Highlands, 
Mass., Cigar Packer. 

Bishop, Edgar A., C. S. C, 
Peterboro, N. H., with American 
Guernsey Cattle Club. 

Braune, Domingos H., D. G. K., 
Pinheiro, Brazil, Professor of 
Agriculture, Government Agri- 
cultural College. 

Hevia, Alfred A., 4> 2 K, 71 Nassau 

St., New York City, Real Estate 

and Insurance. 
Holman, Samuel M., Q. T. V., 

39 Pleasant St., Attleboro, Mass. 

Real Estate and Insurance. 



18 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



1884 

Lindsey, Joseph B.,3> K <£. A S 3>, 

Amherst, Mass., Vice-Director 
and Chemist, Massachusetts 
Agricultural Experiment Sta- 
tion; Goessmann Professor of 
Chemistry, Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural College. A. M. and 
Ph. D., Gottingen, Germany, 
1891. 

Minott, Charles W., C. S. C, 
Hudson, Mas^., State Agent, 
Gypsy and Brown Tail Moth 
Suppression. 

Nourse, David 0., C. S. C, 
Newburg, N. Y., Farmer. 

Preston, Charles H., 3>K<i>, K2, 

Hathorne, Mass., Farmer, Bank 
President, Trustee Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College. 

Wheeler, Homer J., C. S. C, 
92 State St., Boston, Mass.,. 
Agricultural Expert for the 
American Agricultural Chemical 
Co. 



NON-GRADUATES 

fChaplin, John D. H. 

tConger, Charles T. 

*Fletcher, Frank H. Deceased. 

Owen, Henry W., Amherst, Mass. 

fSelden, John Lincoln. 

tSmith, William E. 

tTryon, Charles Osmer. 



1884 

•f Hermes, Charles, Q. T. V., address 
unknown. 

■{"Holland, Harry D., Amherst, 
Mass., Merchant. 

Jones, Elisha A., $ 2 K, New 
Canaan, Conn., Farm Superin- 
tendent. 

tSmith, Llewellyn, Q. T. V., address 
unknown. 



1885 

NON-GRADUATES 

tBrown, Henry Clinton. 
tDickinson, Howard W. 
D wight, Edwin Welles, 87 Milk 
St., Boston, Mass., Physician. 
tLublin, Alfred William. 

Mayo, Walter Parker, South Fram- 
ingham, Mass. 

*Redding, Merton Jay. Deceased. 
Smith, William Henderson, 76 
South Pleasant St., Amherst, 
Mass., Farmer. 

t Smith William Ratcliffe. 



1885 

E. W. Allen, Secretary. 

Allen, Edwin W., $ K $, C. S. C, 
1923 Biltmore St., Washington, 
D. C, Assistant Director, Office 
of Experiment Stations, United 
States Department of Agricul- 
ture. Ph. D., Gottingen, Ger- 
many, 1890. 

f Almeida, Luciano J. De, D. G. K., 
Cajurie Est Sao Paulo, Brazil, 
Surveyor. 

Barber, George H., Q. T. V., 
U. S. Naval Hospital, Las 
Animas, Colo., Physician and 
Surgeon, U. S. Navy. M. D., 
College for Physicians and Sur- 
geons, New York, 1888. 
tBrowne, Charles W., * K <£, West- 
boro, Mass. 

Goldthwait, Joel E., $K*, C. S. 
C, Hyde Park, Mass. Business 
address, 372 Marlborough St., 
Boston, Mass., Physician. M.D. 
College for Physicians and Sur- 
geons, New York, 1888. 

Howell, Hezekiah, $ S K, Wash- 
ingtonville, Orange Co., New 
York, Retired. 
*Leary, Lewis C, died April 3, 1888, 
at Cambridge, Mass. 



ADDRESS LIST 



19 



1886 

Phelps, Charles S., <f>K$, K 2, 

Salisbury, Conn., Farmer. 
Taylor, Isaac N., Jr., K 2, 670 
Eddy St., San Francisco, Cal., 
Retired. 

Tekirian, Benoni O., C. S. C, 
201 West 118th St., New York. 
Business address, Grand and 
7th Sts., Hoboken, N. J. 
Merchant. 



NON-GRADUATES 

fBrooks, Paul C. P. 

Buffmgton, Charles O., D. G. K., 
Ware, Mass., Farmer and Mail 
Carrier. 

fChadbourne, Albert H. 

*Cutter, Charles Sumner, died 

August, 1909. 
Day, William Lyman, Warren 

Mass., Farmer. 

Dickinson, John F., 605 Atlantic 
Ave., Boston, Mass. Home 
address, Amherst. 

fMarch, Wilbur Merriam. 

tNash, John Adams. 

*Nichols, Andrew, Jr. Deceased. 

f Putnam, George Herbert. 

tSpaulding, Charles Plumb. 

fSpaulding, George Edwin. 

Whittemore, Joseph Sidney,Leices- 
ter, Mass., Card Clothing Fin- 
isher. 

tWoodhull, George Gouge. 



1886 

Winfield Ayres, Secretary. 

fAteshian, Oscar H., C. S. C, 
Hotel San Remo, New York 
City, .Merchant. 

Atkins, William H., D. G. K., 
Burnside, Conn., Florist. 



1886 

Ayres, Winfield, K 2, Stamford, 
Conn. Business address, 616 
Madison Ave., New York City, 
Physician. M. D., Bellevue 
Hospital Medical College, 1893. 

Carpenter, David F., $ K <f>, K 2, 

Littleton, N. H., Superintendent 
of Schools. 
Clapp, Charles W., C. S. C, 
288 Main St., Greenfield, Mass., 
Chief Engineer, Massachusetts 
Northern Railways. 

Duncan, Richard F., $ 2 K ; M. D., 
1236 Westminster St., Provi- 
dence R. I., Physician. . 

Eaton, William A., D. G. K., 

Nyack, N. Y., Business address, 
1 Madison Ave., New York 
City, Lumber Dealer. 

Felt, Charles F. W., $ K *, C. S. C. 
1020 Van Buren St., Topeka, 
Kans., Chief Engineer, Atchison, 
Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad. 

MacKintosh, Richard B., <fr K $, 
D. G. K., 21 Aborn St., Peabody, 
Mass., with United Shoe Mach- 
inery Company. 

Sanborn, Kingsbury, $ 2 K, River- 
side, Cal., Hydraulic Engineer. 

Stone, George E., $ K $, $ 2 K, 
Amherst, Mass., Professor of 
Botany, Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural College; Plant Pathol- 
ogist Massachusetts Agricul- 
tural Experiment Station. 
Ph. D., Leipsic University, 
Germany, 1892. 

Stone, George S., D. G. K., Otter 

River, Mass., Farmer. 

NON-GRADUATES 

tBarker, John King. 
Bement, John Emery, Amherst, 
Mass., Foreman and Coal Deal- 
er. 

Copeland, Alfred Bigelow, Russell, 
Mass., Manufacturer. 

f.Doucet, Walter Hobart. 



20 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



1887 

Fowler, John Henry, Westfield, 
Mass., Market Gardener. 

tGaskill, Milo A. 

t Kinney, Arno Lewis. 

tLang, Charles Joseph, Physician. 

*Leland, William Edwin, died 

December 1, 1901. 
Palmer, Robert Manning, 405 

Colman Bldg., Seattle, Wash., 

Banker. 
*Smith Walter Storm. Deceased. 
Wheeler, George W., Deposit, 

N. Y., Veterinary Surgeon. 

fWinslow, Edgar Daniel. 



1887 

F. H. Fowler, Secretary. 

f Almeida, Augusto L., De, D. G. K., 
Rio Janeiro, Brazil. 

Barrett, Edward W., D. G. K., 
-34 Washington St., Medford, 
Mass., Physician. M. D., Jeff- 
erson Medical College. 

Caldwell, William H., K S, Peter- 
boro, N. H., Farmer; Secretary 
and Treasurer, American Guern- 
sey Cattle Club. 

Carpenter, Frank B., •i'K^, 
C. S. C, 502 Hawthorne Ave., 
Business address, 11 South 12th 
St., Richmond, Va., Chief Chem- 
ist Virginia- Carolina Chemical 
Co. 

Chase, William E., 11 East 60th 
St., North Portland, Ore., Far- 
mer. 

Davis, Frederick A. C. S. C, 
223 Majestic Bldg., Denver. 
Colo., Physician. M. D., Har- 
vard, 1891; A. M., Harvard, 
1900. 

Fisherdick, Cyrus W., C. S. C, 
Laplata, San Juan Co., New 
Mexico, Merchant and Rancher. 



1887 

Flint, Edward R., $ K <I>, Q. T. V., 

Gainesville, Fla., Professor of 
Chemistry. University of Flori- 
da; Ph. D., Gottingen, Ger- 
many; M. D. Harvard. 

Fowler, Frederick H., <1>K<I», 

C. S. C, Shirley, Mass., Clerk, 
Industrial School for Boys. 

Howe, Clinton S., C. S. C, 
West Medway, Mass., Farmer. 

Marsh, James M., C. S. C, 
Topsfield, Mass., President and 
Treasurer, George E. Marsh Co. 
Lynn. 

Marshall, Charles L., D. G. K. 
Dedham, Mass., Florist and 
Gardener. 

*Meehan, Thomas F., D. G. K., 
died April 4, 1905, at Boston, 

Mass. 

Osterhout, Jeremiah C, Chelms- 
ford, Mass., Farmer. 

Richardson, Evan F., $ 2 K, 
Millis, Mass., Farmer, Lecturer 
State Grange. 

Rideout, Henry N. W., Q. T. V., 
7 Howe St., Winter Hill, Mass., 
Assistant Paymaster, B. & M. 
R. R. 

Tolman, William' N., $2K, 1401 
Arch St., Philadelphia, Pa., 
Civil Engineer with United 
Gas Improvement Co. 

fTorrelly, Firninoi Da S., D.G.K., 
Cidado de Rio Grande do Sud, 
Brazil. 

Watson, Charles H., Q. T. V., 
184 Summer St., Boston, Mass., 
Retired. 

NON-GRADUATES 

Allen, Frederick C, 150 North St., 
New York City. 

t Avery, David Ebenezer. 

fBall, William Munroe. 

Bond, Richard Henry, Box 26, 
Needham, Mass., Farmer. 

tBreen, Timothy R. 



ADDRESS LIST 



21 



1887 
Brown, Frederick W., 246 Sum- 
mer St., Boston, Mass. Home 
address, Amherst, N. H. Direc- 
tory compiler. 

Brown, Herbert Lewis, 30 Clem- 
ent Ave., Peabody, Mass., 
Postal Service. 

Chapin, Clinton Gerdine, Chico- 
pee, Mass., Farmer. 

Clarke, Frank Scripture, Hope- 
. dale, Mass., Clerk, Draper Co. 

Cushman, Ralph H., Bernardston, 
Mass., Farmer. 

fDanield, Joseph Frank. 

tHathaway, Bradford, O. 

fKasmire, George Frank. 

TLong, Stephen Henry. 

t Martin, Joseph, 2d., Marblehead. 

t Merchant, Charles E. 
Merritt, Walter Heston, 174 High 
St., Springfield, Mass., Mach- 
inist. 
Nourse, Silas Johnson, 61 Dana 
St., West Haven, Conn., Brick- 
layer. 
Paine, Ansel Wass, 198 Bird 
Ave., Buffalo, N. Y. U. S. Im- 
migrant Inspector. 

Robinson, George P., Q. T. V., 
Fair Oaks, Sacramento Co., 
Cal., President American Can- 
non and Water Co. 

Rose, Newton Augustus. 

Shaughnessy, John Joseph, 64 

Fairmount St., Marlboro, Mass., 

Lawyer. 

tStone, Fremont E. 

fTucker, Frederick D. Clergyman. 

White, Herbert Judson, 145 Vine 

St., Hartford, Conn. , Clergyman. 

1888 

H. C. Bliss, Secretary. 
Belden, Edward H., C. S. C, 
18 Park View St., Roxbury, 
Mass., with Edison Electric 
Illuminating Co. of Boston. 



1888 
Bliss, Herbert C, K 2, 14 Mech- 
anic St. Business address, 191 
North Main St., Attleboro, 
Mass., Manufacturing Jeweler. 

Brooks, Fred K., C. S. C, 36 
Brockton Ave. Business ad- 
dress, 14 Washington St., Hav- 
erhill, Mass., Laundryman. 

Cooley, Fred S., <t>K4>, *SK, 
Bozeman, Mont., Supervisor of 
Farmers' Institutes. 

Dickinson, Edwin H., C. S. C, 
North Amherst, Mass., Farmer. 

Field, Samuel H., C. S. C, North 
Hatfield, Mass., Farmer. 

Foster, Francis H., Andover, 
Mass., Civil Engineer and 
Farmer. 

Hayward, Albert I., C. S. C., 
Ashby, Mass., Farmer. 

Holt, Jonathan E., C. S. C, 
Andover, Mass., Agent. 

Kinney, Lorenzo F., Kingston, 
R. I., Commercial Horticultur- 
alist. 

Knapp, Edward E., K 2, Glen- 
olden, Pa., in Mechanical 
Department, Atlantic Refining 
Company. 

fMishima, Viscount Yataro, D. G. 
K., 5 Shinrudo, Azabuku, Japan. 
Moore, Robert B., $ K <t>, C. S. C, 
2520 South Cleveland St. Bus- 
iness address, 897 Drexel Bldg., 
Philadelphia, Pa., Superintend- 
ent with American Agricultural 
Chemical Company. 

tNewman, George E., Q. T. V., 
287 North First St., San Jose.Cal. 
Noyes, Frank F., K 2. 472 North 
Jackson St., Atlanta, Ga., 
Superintendent Electric Power 
Company. 

Parsons, Wilfred A., $ 2 K, South- 
ampton, Mass., Farmer. 

Rice, Thomas, D. G. K., 159 
Maple St. Business address, 
38 Pleasant St., Fall River, 
Mass., Journalist. 



22 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



1889 

Shepardson, William M., C. S. C., 
Middlebury, Conn., Landscape 
Gardener. 

Shimer, Boyer L., Q. T. V., 
Mt. Airy Park, Bethlehem, Pa., 
Farmer and Real Estate. 



NON-GRADUATES 

Ayer, Warren, Lawrence, Mass. 

f Cutler, George W., Physician. 

Dole, Edward Johnson, Chicopee, 
Mass. 

Hinsdale, Rufus C, Greenfield, 
Mass. 

Johnson, Irving H., 50 Woodland 
St., Newburyport, Mass., 
Teacher. 

Loomis, Herbert R., North Am- 
herst, Mass., Farmer. 

Parker, James South worth, Great 
Barrington, Mass. 

Rogers, Howard Perry, |68 Co- 
chituate St., Framingham,Mass. 
Veterinary Surgeon. 

Smith, Willis P., Pasadena, Cal. 

White, Henry Kirke, Whately, 

Mass. 

Worthington, Alvan F., 8 Creda 
St., East Dedham, Mass. In- 
surance. 



1889 

C. S. Crocker, Secretary 

Blair, James R., Q. T. V., 158 

Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, 
Mass., Superintendent of C. 
Brigham Co., Milk Contractors. 
*Copeland, Arthur D., K 2, died 
September 3, 1907, at Brockton, 
Mass. 

Crocker, Charles S., K 2, 1003 
South 25th St., Philadelphia, 
Pa., Chemist with American 
Agricultural ChemicalCompany. 



1889 

Davis, Franklin W.,*K*,$SK, 
85 Colberg Ave., Roslindale, 
Mass., Journalist. 

Hartwell, Burt L., $ K <*>, C. S. C, 
Kingston, R. I., Chemist and 
Director, Rhode Island Agri- 
cultural Experiment Station, 
Professor of Agricultural Chem- 
istry, Rhode Island State Col- 
lege. M. Sc, Massachusetts 
Agricultural College, 1900; Ph. 
D., University of Pennsylvania, 
1903. 

Hubbard, Dwight L., C. S. C, 
Billerica, Mass., Civil Engineer. 

Hutchings, James T., $SK, 56 
Averill Ave. Business address, 
34 Clinton Ave., Rochester, 
N. Y., General Manager of 
Rochester Railway and Light 
Co. 

♦Kellogg, William A., $2 K died 
March 28, 1910, at North- 
ampton, Mass. 

Miles, Arthur L., C. S. C, 12 
Magazine St., Cambridge, Mass. 
Dentist. D. D. S., Boston 
Dental College, 1898; D. M. D., 
Tufts College, 1909. 

North, Mark N., Q. T. V. f 
Windsor, Vt., Veterinarian. 

Nourse, Arthur M., C. S. C, 
Westboro, Mass., Farmer. 

Sellew, Robert P., $SK, 15 
Glenville Ave., Alston. Busi- 
ness address, 7 Merchants Row, 
Boston, Sales Manager. 

fWhitney, Charles A., C. S. C, 
Upton, Mass. 

fWoodbury, Herbert E., C. S. C, 
1512 North Delaware St., Indi- 
anapolis, Ind. M. D., Harvard, 
1899. 

NON-GRADUATES 

Adams, George Albert, Winchen- 
don, Mass. 

Alger, George Ward, West Bridge- 
water, Mass., Farmer. 



ADDRESS LIST 



23 



1890 

Alger, Isaac, Jr., 247 Pleasant 

St., Attleboro, Mass. Farmer. 
Colcord, Wallace R., Dover, Mass. 
Huse, Frederick R., Winchester, 

Mass., Business. 
Lumbard, Joseph E., 1925 Seventh 

Ave., Graham Court, New York 

City. Physician. 

fOkami, Yoshiji, Tokio, Japan. 

Smith, James Robert, Walpole, 
Mass. 

Sprague, William Arnold, Chep- 
achet, R. I. 

Waite, Herbert Harold, Belcher- 
town, Mass. 

Wells, Charles Otis, Hatfield, 

.Mass. 

Wentworth, Elihu F., Canton. 

Mass. 

White, Louis Allis, Whately, Mass. 



1890 

David Barry, Secretary 

Barry, David, $ K 3>, Q. T. V., 

398 Walnut St., Newtonville, 
Mass. Business address, 111 
Devonshire St., Boston, Mass., 
Electrician. 

*Bliss, Clinton E., D. G. K., died 
. August 24, 1894, at Attleboro, 
Mass. 

*Castro, Arthur De M., D. G. K., 
died May 2, 1894, at Juiz de 
Fora, Minas, Brazil. 

Dickinson, Dwight W., Q. T. V., 
Watertown, Mass., Dentist. 
D. M. D., Harvard, 1895. 

Felton, Truman P., C. S. C, 
West Berlin, Mass., Farmer. 

Gregory, Edgar, C. S. C, Marble- 
head, Mass., Seedsman. 

Haskins, Henri D., Q. T. V., 

Amherst, Mass., Asst. Chemist, 
Massachusetts Agricultural Ex- 
periment Station. 



1890 

fHerreo, Jose M., D. G. K., 

Havana, Cuba, Editor. 
Jones, Charles H., $ K 4>, Q. T. V., 

83 Brooks Ave., Burlington, Vt., 

Chemist Vermont Agricultural 

Experiment Station. 
*Loring, John S., D. G. K., died 

January 17, 1893, at Orlando, 

Fla. 
McCloud, Albert C, Q. T. V., 

Amherst, Mass., Insurance and 

Real Estate. 

Mossman, Fred W., C. S. C, 
Westminster, Mass., Farmer. 

Russell, Henry L., D. G. K., 
Pawtucket, R. I., Secretary, 
Pawtucket Ice Company. 

*Simonds, George B., C. S. C, 
died July 19, 1909, at Fitchburg, 
Mass. 

Smith, Frederick J., $ K$, Q. T. 
V., Pierce Phosphate Company, 
Pierce, Polk Co., Fla., Chemist. 
M. Sc, Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural College, 1896. 
tStowe, Arthur N., Q. T. V., 
Hudson, Mass., Farmer. 

Taft, Walter E., D. G. K., 
Berlin, N. H., Mechanical 
Engineer. 
■jTaylor, Frederick L., Q. T. V., 
524 Warren St., Boston, Mass., 
Physician. M. D., Harvard, 
1901. 
*West, John S., Q. T. V., died 
July 13, 1902, at Belchertown, 
Ma'ss. 

Williams, Frank O., Q. T. V., 
Sunderland, Mass., Farmer. 

NON-GRADUATES 

Braman, Samuel Noyes, Wayland, 
Mass. 

*Coburn, Oscar Bennett, died Nov- 
ember 15, 1889, at Weston, 
Mass. 

tFrost, William Lawrence, Boston. 



24 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



1891 

Fuller, Edward A., 170 Common 
St., Lawrence, Mass., Stable- 
keeper. 

Goddard, George A., Turners 
Falls, Mass. 

Hallet, Charles W., Barnstable, 
Mass., Machinist. 

Hogan, Frederick William, Greens- 
ville, N. Y. 

Maynard, John Bowen, Northamp- 
ton, Mass. 

Pearson, George Cowing, Reading, 
Mass. 

Russell, Fred Newton, Sunderland, 
Mass. 

Stillings, L. Chamberlain, Med- 
ford, Mass. Physician. 

Stratton, Edward N., R. F. D. 
No. 1, Marlboro, Mass. 

Thayer, Bernard, Randolph, Mass. 
Whitcomb, Nahum H., Littleton, 
Mass., Farmer. 

"Williams, Arthur S., Sunderland. 
Mass. 



1891 

H. T. Shores, Secretary. 

Arnold, Frank L., $ K$, Q. T. V., 

32 School St., North Woburn, 
Mass., Chemist. 

*Brown, Walter A., C. S. C, died 
January 18, 1910, at Springfield, 

Mass. 

Carpenter, Malcolm A., C. S. C, 

33 High St., Greenfield, Mass., 
Landscape Gardener. 

fEames, Aldice G., * 2 K, North 
Wilmington, Mass., Journalist. 
Felt, E. Porter, C. S. C, Nassau, 
N. Y. Business address, State 
Educational Bldg., Albany, 
N. Y., State Entomologist. 
D. Sc, Cornell, 1894. 

fField, Henry J., Q. T. V., Green- 
field, Mass. 



1891 

Gay, Willard W., D. G. K., 
New Rochelle, N. Y. Business 
address, 156 Fifth Ave., New 
York City, Landscape Gardener 
and Engineer. 

Horner, Louis F., C. S. C, 
San Gabriel, Cal., Landscape 
Architect. 

Howard, Henry M., C. S. C, 
284 Fuller St., West Newton, 
Mass., Market Gardener. 

Hull, John B., Jr., D. G. K., 
Great Barrington, Mass., Coal 
Dealer. 

t Johnson, Charles H., D. G. K., 
8 Harvard Ave., Dorchester, 
Mass., Electrical Engineer. 

tLage, Oscar V. B., D. G. K., 
Juiz de Fora, Minas, Brazil. 

*Legate, Howard N., D. G. K., 
died March 28, 1912, at Rox- 
bury, Mass. 

Magill, Claude A., 59 Division St. 
Business address, 902 Chapel 
St., New Haven, Conn., General 
Manager Connecticut Hassam 
Paving Co. 

Paige, Walter C, D. G. K., 
Houston, Tex. General Secre- 
tary, Y. M. C. A. 

Ruggles, Murray, C. S. C, 25 
School St., Milton, Mass., Sup- 
erintendent Electric Works. 

Sawyer, Arthur H., Q. T. V., 
131 North 16th St., East Orange, 
N. J., Cement Inspector. 

Shores, Harvey T., K 2, 177 Elm 
St., Northampton, Mass., Phys- 
ician. M. D., Harvard, 1894. 

NON-GRADUATES 

Belden, Allan M., 104 Alden St., 
Springfield, Mass., Milk Dealer. 
tBush, Edward, Boston. 

Davenport, Alfred M., 88 Grove 
St., Watertown, Mass. 

DuBois, Cornelius M., Essex, 
Mass. 



ADDRESS LIST 



25 



1892 

Hull, Henry Banks, 219 Park 
St., New Haven, Conn*, Shipr 
ping Clerk. 

*Hurley, Michael E., died Jan. 10, 
1899, at Amherst, Mass. 

tPalmer, Herbert W. 

Pond, William Hollis, North 
Attleboro, Mass. 

Russell, Edward E., 4 Hudson 
St., Worcester, Mass. Engineer. 

Sanderson, Harry Tilson, Leicester, 
Mass., with American Steel and 
Wire Co. 

Tuttle, Henry Fessenden, West- 
port, Conn. 

Wood, Augustus Roswell, Ray- 
mondville, Cameron Co., Texas. 



1892 

H. M. Thompson, Secretary. 

Beals, Alfred T., Q. T. V., 159 

East 33d St. Business address, 
71 West 23d St., New York 
City, Photographer. 

Boynton, Walter I., Q. T. V., 
73 Dartmouth St., Springfield, 
Mass. Business address, 310 
Main St., Dentist. D. D. S., 
Boston Dental College, 1895. 

Clark, Edward T., C. S. C, 
Shirley, Mass., Farm Manager, 
Industrial School for Boys. 

tCrane, Henry E., C. S. C, 
Monroe Road, Quincy, Mass. 

Deuel, James E., Q. T. V., 
Amherst, Mass., Druggist. 
Ph. G., College of Pharmacy, 
Boston, Mass. 

Emerson, Henry B., C. S. C, 
6 Central St., Methuen, Mass., 
Superintendent of Arlington 
Mills. 

Field, Judson L., Q. T. V., Oak 
Park, 111. Business address, 
West Jackson Boulevard, Chic- 
ago, 111., Director Jenkins, 
Kreer & Co. 



1892 

t Fletcher, William, C. S. C, 
Chelmsford, Mass. 

Graham, Charles S., C. S. C, 
Holden, Mass., Farmer. 

Holland, Edward B., $ K#, K 2, 
Amherst, Mass., Associate 
Chemist, Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural Experiment Station. 
M. Sc, Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural College. 

Hubbard, Cyrus M., Q. T. V. 
Sunderland Mass. Farmer. 

Knight Jewell B. Q. T. V. 
Poona, India, Professor of Agri- 
culture and Director Experiment 
Station, Poona College. M. Sc, 
Massachusetts Agricultural Col- 
lege, 1901. 

Lyman, Richard P., Q. T. V., 
East Lansing, Mich. Dean of 
Veterinary Division Michigan 
Agricultural College. M. D. V., 
Harvard, 1894. 

Plumb, Frank H., Q. T. V., 
Stafford Springs, Conn. , Farmer. 

Rogers, Elliott, *2K, Kennebunk, 
Me., Manufacturer. 

*Smith, Robert H., $SK, died 

March 25, 1900, at Amherst, 

Mass. 
Stockbridge, Francis G., <£ K <£>, 

D. G. K., Englishtown, N. J., 

Farmer. 
Taylor, George E., * K <i>, Q. T. V., 

Shelburne, Mass., Farmer. 

Thomson, Henry M., <£K<I>, 
C. S. C, Amherst, Mass., 
Farmer. 

fWest, Homer C, Q. T. V., 
Belchertown, Mass., Traveling 
Agent. 
Willard, George B., $2K, 14 
Lafayette St., Waltham, Mass., 
City Treasurer and Collector of 
Taxes. 

Williams, Milton H., Q. T. V., 
Sunderland, Mass., Veterinarian. 
M. D. V., Harvard, 1894. 



26 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



1892 

NON-GRADUATES 

Baldus, Franicis 119 Highland 
St., Brockton, Mass., Traveling 
Salesman. 

Bardin, James Edgar, Dalton, 
Mass., Farmer. 

Chamberlain, Pierce A., North- 
field, Mass. 

Condit, Charles De Hart,Boonton, 
N. J. Farmer. 

Davidson, Royal Page, Highland 
Park, 111. 

Eaton, Henry Newell, Gloucester, 

Mass. 

Faneuf, Arthur Gelis, 185 King 
St., Springfield, Mass., Mach- 
inist. 

Farrar, Frederick A., South Man- 
chester, Conn., Hardware Deal- 
er. 

Fowle, Samuel Osie, Needham, 
Mass., Veterinarian. 

Goldthwait, William J., 114 Elm 
St., Marblehead, Mass., Real 
Estate. 

Gorham, Frederick S., Westport, 
Conn. 

Haley, George W., 58 Main St., 
Stonington, Conn. Business. 

tHoar, Thomas, Amherst, Mass. 

Howe, Elbridge Lewis, New Haven 

Lindsey, Ernest, Marblehead 

Mass. 

McDonald, Frederick J., Montreal » 
Canada. 

Nauss, Charles S., 118 Washington 
St., Gloucester, Mass., Lumber 
Dealer. 

Page, Harry Savage, South Orange, 

Saville, James R., Rockport, Mass. 

Sedgwick, Benjamin, Cornwall 
Hollow, Mass. 

tStone, Harlan Fisk 
Tyng, Charles, Victoria, Texas. 



1893 

Tyng, George McAlpine, Victoria, 
Texas. 

Weed, Wallace Dana, Marblehead, 
Mass. 



1893 

F. A. Smith, Secretary. 

Baker, Joseph, Q. T. V., North 
Grosvenordale, Conn., Farmer. 

Bartlett, Frederick G., D. G. K., 
298 Cabot St., Holyoke, Mass., 
Superintendent Forestdale Cem- 
etery. 

Clark, Henry D., C. S. C, 69 
High St., Fitchburg, Mass., 
Veterinarian. D. V. S., McGill 
University, 1895. 

tCurley, George F., $ K $, C. S. C, 

10 Congress St., Milford, Mass. 

Davis, Herbert C, Q. T. V., 

45 West Cain St., Atlanta, Ga., 

Railway Postal Service. 

Goodrich, Charles A., D. G. K., 
61 North Beacon St. Business 
address, 5 Haynes St., Hartford, 
Conn., Physician. M. D., Col- 
lege for Physicians and Surgeons, 
New York, 1896. 

Harlow, Francis T., $ 2 K, Marsh- 
field, Mass., Farmer. 

t Harlow, Harry J., K 2, Shrews- 
bury, Mass.. Farmer. 

tHawks, Ernest A., C. S. C, address 
unknown. 

Henderson, Frank H., D. G. K., 
New Rochelle, N. Y. Business 
address, 11 East 24th St., 
New York City, Civil Engineer. 

Howard, Edwin C, * 2 K, Oliver 
Hazard Perry School, Boston, 
Mass., Teacher. 

tHoyt, Franklin S., C. S. C, 
44 Winthrop St., West Newton. 
Mass., Editor Educational De- 
partment, Houghton, Mifflin & 
Company. A. M., Columbia, 
1904. 



ADDRESS LIST 



27 



1893 

Lehnert, Eugene H., $K<I>, K 2, 

7 Franklin St., Northampton, 
Mass., Teacher. 

Melendy, A. Edward, Q. T. V., 
11 Grant St., Wollaston, Mass., 
Clerk C. and R. Department, 
U. S. Navy. 

Perry, John R., D. G. K., 1588 
Beacon St., Brookline, Mass. 
Business address, 101 Tremont 
St., Boston, Mass. Decorator 
and Painter. 

Smith, Cotton A., Q. T. V., 
Los Angeles Athletic Club, 
Business address, 614 Trust and 
Savings Bldg., Los Angeles, Cal., 
Real Estate. Ph. B., Sheffield 
Scientific School, 1894. 

Smith, Fred A., C. S. C, Turner 
Hill, Ipswich, Mass., Farm 
Superintendent. 

Smith, Luther W., *2K, Man- 
teno, 111., Stock Farmer. 

Staples, Henry F., C. S. C, 
8628 Wade Park Ave. Business 
address, 1020 Rose Bldg., Cleve- 
land, O., Physician. M. D., 
Cleveland University of Medi- 
cine and Surgery, 1896. 

tTinoco, Linz A. F., D. G. K., 
Campos, Rio Janeiro, Brazil, 
Planter and Manufacturer. 
Walker, Edward J., C. S. C, 
Boylston, Mass., Farmer. 



NON-GRADUATES 

*Barrus, Sheridan Ezra, deceased. 
*Green, Carlton Dewitt, died at 

Belchertown, January, 1892. 
tGregory, James Howard, Fresno, 

U. S. Columbia, South -America. 

*Harvey, David Pearce, died in 
1891. 

Haskell, Ernest Albert, Amherst, 
Mass. 

Higgins, Nelson Francis, West- 
hampton, Mass. 



1894 

Kellogg, John Hawkes, Hartford,. 
Conn. 

Lane, William Arthur, Rockport r 
Mass. 

tMunro, David. 

Parker, Charles H., 9 Hawley St.,. 
Worcester, Mass. Real Estate. 

*Pember, Walter Stephen, died 
December 22, 1893. 

Poole, Jerome, Rockport, Conn. 

Ranney, William H., Derry Vil- 
lage, N. H., Superintendent, 
Hood Farm. 

Soule, George W., West Dedharn, 

Mass. 
Wells, Louie Ensign, North Ash- 
ford, Conn., Farmer. 

*Woodbrey, Gilpin B., died in 
Waltham in 1895 or 1896. 

tYamamura, Kohachi, Yehimeken,. 
Japan. 



1894 

S. F. Howard, Secretary. 

Alderman, Edwin H., C. S. C. r 
R. F. D., No. 2, Chester, Mass. r 
Farmer. 

Averell, Fred G., Q. T. V., 131 

State St., Boston, Mass., Clerk. 

Bacon, Linus H., Q. T. V., 
36 Cherry St., Spencer, Mass., 
with Phoenix Paper Box Com- 
pany. 

Bacon, Theodore S.,$K*,*2K, 
69 Maple St., Springfield, Mass., 
Physician and Surgeon. M. D. r 
Harvard, 1898. 

Barker, Louis M., C. S. C, 
Hanson, Mass., Civil Engineer. 

Boardman, Edwin L., C. S. C, 
Sheffield, Mass., Farmer. 

Brown, Charles L., C. S. C, 
1364 Westfield St., West Spring- 
field, Mass. Business address, 
870 State St., Springfield, Mass., 
Laundry man. 



28 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



1894 

Curtis, Arthur C, C. S. C, 
Spring Valley, N. Y., Farmer. 

Cutter, Arthur EL, $2K, 333 
Broadway, Lawrence, Mass., 
Physician and Surgeon. M. D., 
Harvard, 1901. 

Davis, Perley E., Q. T. V., 
Granby, Mass., Farmer. 
fDickinson, Eliot T., Q. T. V.» 
32 Maple St., Florence, Mass- 
Business address, 138 Main St.» 
Northampton, Mass. Dentist. 

Fowler, Halley M., D. G. K., 52 

Madison St., Somerville, Mass. 
Railway Postal Clerk. 

*Fowler, Henry J., C. S. C, died 
February 2, 1911, at Hadley, 

Mass. 

Gifford, John E., K 2, Millbury, 
Mass., Farmer. 

tGreene, Frederick L., C. S. C, 
Modesto, Cal., Teacher. A.M., 
Columbia, 1899. 

Greene, Ira C, Q. T. V., 222 

Pleasant St., Leominster, Mass., 
Ice and Coal Dealer. 

Higgins, Charles H., C. S. C, 
196 Cartier St., Ottawa, Can., 
Pathologist to Departmnet of 
Agriculture, Dominion of Can- 
ada. D. V. S., McGill Univer- 
sity, 1896; Fellow of the Royal 
Microscopical Society of London, 
England, 1910. 

Howard, S. Francis, $ K <t>, $ 2 K, 
Amherst, Mass. M. Sc, Mass- 
achusetts Agricultural College, 
1901; Ph. D., John Hopkins 
University, 1912. Teacher 
Chemistry, Amherst College. 

Keith, Thaddeus F., Q. T. V., 
8 Wallace Ave., Fitchburg, 
Mass., Sign Manufacturer. 

Kirkland, Archie H., <t> 2 K, Hunt- 
ington, Mass., Consulting Ent- 
omologist. M. Sc, Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College, 1896. 



1894 

Lounsbury, Charles P., <i>K<£. 
$ 2 K, Chief of Division of 
Entomology, Department of 
Agriculture, Pretoria, South 
Africa. 

Manley, Lowell, K 2, West Rox- 
bury, Mass., Farm Superintend- 
ent, 

Merwin, George H., C. S. C, 
Southport, Conn., Farmer. 

Morse, Alvertus J., Q. T. V., 
59 Main St., Northampton, 
Mass., Lawyer. L. L. B., Bos- 
ton University, 1901. 

*Pomeroy, Robert F., C. S. C, died 
1909. 

Putnam, Joseph H., K 2, Litch- 
field, Conn., Farm Superintend- 
ent. 

t Sanderson, William E., K 2, ad- 
dress unknown. 

Smead, H. Preston, K 2, Green- 
field, Mass., Farmer. 
*Smith, Geo. E., died Jan. 20,1911. 

Smith, Ralph E., <J> K $, $ 2 K, 

Berkeley, Cal., Professor of 
Plant Pathology, University of 
California. 

Spaulding, Charles H., $ 2 K, 223 
Massachusetts Ave., Lexington, 
Mass., United States Inspector, 
Engineering Department. 

Walker, Claude F., C. S. C, 906 
Summit Ave. Business address, 
155 West 65th St., New York 
City, Teacher, High School of 
Commerce. Ph. D., Yale, 1897. 

White, Elias D., $ 2 K, Athens, 
Ga., Postal Service. 



NON-GRADUATES 

Allen, Edward Welcome, Winches- 
chester, N. H. 

*Austin, John, died in 1897. 



ADDRESS LIST 



29 



1894 

Babbitt, Ellwood, c/o Depart- 
ment of State, Washington, D.C. 
Vice-Consul to Yokohoma, Japan 
from the United States. 

Barton, Charles Henry, 456 Main 
St., Buffalo, N. Y. Shoe 
Specialist. 

Bentley, Irving W., Hartsville, 

Mass. 

Blanchard, Samuel P., Harvard, 
Mass. 

Cook, Jay Erastus, 84 Vesper St., 
Akron, O. 

tDrowne, George L., Providence. 

Dufneld, William C, Quincy Point, 
Mass. 

Goessmann, Louis E.,220 Congress 
St., Boston, Mass. Salesman. 

Goodell, John Stanton, Hana, 
Maui, T. H., Farmer. 

Johnson, Charles F., Littleton, 
Mass., Chemist. 

t Jones, John Horace, Pelham, Mass. 

Teamed, Henry Bond, died Jan. 
3, 1891. 

Marvin, Samuel B., Richford, Vt. 

Morse, Elisha Wilson, Office of 
Experiment Station, U. S. De- 
partment of Agriculture, Wash- 
ington, D. C, Specialist in 
Animal Husbandry. 

Park, Fred Ware, Chelmsford, 
Mass., Artesian Wells. 

Parker, Frank Ingram, 1010 White 
Bldg., Buffalo, N. Y. 

Robbins, Dana Watkins, Walpole, 
Mass. 

Sanford, George Otis, U. S. 
Reclamation Service, Malta, 
Mont, Engineer. 

Starr, Erastus Jones, Spencer, 
Mass., Superintenent of Water 
Works. 

Stockwell, Harry G., Sutton, 
Mass. 

Streeter, Albert R., Maple Dell, 
Cummington, Mass. 



1895 

Thompson, Edmund F., 12 Wil- 
liam St., Worcester, Mass., 
Mechanician. 

Whitcomb, Arthur M., West 
Acton, Mass., Insurance. 



1895 

E. A. White, Secretary 

Ballou, Henry A., $ K $, Q. T. V., 
Barbadoes, B. W. I., Entomol- 
ogist, Imperial Department of 
Agriculture for the West Indies. 
M. Sc, Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural College, 1906. 

tBemis, Waldo L., Q. T. V. r 
Spencer, Mass., Manufacturer. 
Billings, George A., C. S. C, 
Silver Springs, Md. Business 
address, U. S. Department of 
Agriculture, Washington, D. C, 
Farm Management Investiga- 
tions. 

Brown, William C, D. G. K., 
2 Wild wood Terrace, Winchen- 
don. Business address, 105 
Newbury St., Boston, Mass., 
Interior Decorator. 

Burgess, Albert F.,$2K, Melrose, 
Highlands, Mass., Entomologist 
in U. S. Bureau of Entomology. 
M. Sc, Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural College, 1897. 

Clark, Harry E., <S» 2 K, Middle- 
bury, Conn., Farm Superin- 
tendent. 

Cooley, Robert A., $ 2 K, Boze- 
man, Mont., Professor of Zool- 
ogy and Entomology, Montana 
Agricultural College; State Ent- 
omologist. 

Crehore, Charles W., $2 K, Chic- 

opee, Mass., Farmer. 

Dickinson, Charles M., Q. T. V.,. 
Park Ridge, 111. Business ad- 
dress, 131 North St., Chicago,. 
111., Seedsman and Florist. 



30 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



1895 

Fairbanks, Herbert $., K 2, 321 
West Hansbury St., German- 
town, Pa. Business address, 
232 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, 
Pa., Patent Attorney. 

"Foley, Thomas P. C. S. C, 
113 Nichols Ave., Brooklyn, 
N. Y., Draughtsman. 

Frost, Harold L. * K <£, $2 K, 

Arlington, Mass., Landscape 
Forester and Entomologist ; 
Trustee of Massachusetss Agri- 
cultural College. 

Hemenway, Herbert D., C. S. C, 
Northampton, Mass., General 
Secretary Home Culture Clubs. 

Jones, Robert S., $ 2 K, 1487 
Belmont St. Business address, 
501 Wyandotte Bldg., Columbus, 
Ohio, Contracting Engineer. 

tKuroda, Shiro * 2 K, 127 Second 

St., Osaka, Japan. 
Lane, Clarence B., D. G. K., 

1118 Jefferson St., Philadelphia, 

Pa., Dairyman. 
Lewis, Henry W., 230 West 22d 

St., New York City. 
Marsh, Jasper, K 2, Danvers, 

Mass., Electric Lamp Manufac- 
turer. 
Morse, Walter L., K 2, Grand 

Central Station, New York City, 

Terminal Engineer. 

Potter, Daniel C, C. S. C, 

Fairhaven, Mass., Landscape 

and Sanitary Engineer. 
Read, Henry B., $ 2 K, Westford, 

Mass. Farmer. 
Hoot, Wright A., $2 K, East- 

hampton, Mass., Fruit Grower. 

fSmith, Arthur B., Q. T. V., 
1434 Farragut Ave., Fort Wayne 
Ind., Bookkeeper. 

*Stevens, Clarence L., died October 
8, 1901, at Sheffield, Mass. 

Sullivan, Maurice J., Littleton, 
N. H., Farm Manager. 



1895 

Tobey, Frederick C, C. S. C, 
West Stockbridge, Mass., Lime 
Manufacturer. 

fToole, Stephen P., Amherst, Mass. 

fWarren, Franklin L., Q. T. V., 
address unknown. 

White, Edward A., $ K <£, K 2, 

Amherst, Mass., Professor of 
Floriculture, Massachusetts 

Agricultural College. 

NON-GRADUATES 

Bagg, Edward O., Q. T. V. 
1067 Riverdale St., West Spring- 
field, Mass., Farmer. 

Brown, Mendall H., Amherst, 
Mass. 

Davis, Alfred, West Roxbury, 
Mass. 

Drury, Ralph W., Athol, Mass. 

Soldier. 
Dwyer, Elmer F., 34 Maple St., 

Lynn, Mass. Manufacturer. 

Henderson, Edward H., Port Ches- 
ter, N. Y. 

Hubbard, Guy A., Ashby, Mass. 

Mason, Amos Hall, Medfield, 
Mass., Artesian Wells. 

Parker, Jacob, 405 West 118th 
St., New York City, Teacher. 

Robinson, Frank D., Petersham, 

Mass. 

Taylor, Efford Earl, Vershire, Vt., 
Traveling Salesman. 

Volio, Enrique Tinoco, San Jose, 
Costa Rica. 

Weed, Percy L., 15 Craigie St., 
Cambridge, Mass., Student, 
Massachusetts College of Oste- 
opathy. 

Wentzell, William B. Wentzell 
Ave., Beverly, Mass. Veterina- 
rian. 

Williams, John Sherman, Middle- 
boro, Mass. 

Woodbury, Roger A., Cheshire, 
Conn. 



ADDRESS LIST 



31 



1896 

Asa S. Kinney, Secretary. 

*Burrington, Horace C, $SK, 
died November, 1907, at Green- 
wich, Conn. 

Clapp, Frank L. f #K *, C. S. C, 

Cornwall-on-Hudson, N. Y., 
Civil Engineer. 

Cook, Allen B., C. S. C, Farm- 
ington, Conn., Farm Manager. 

Edwards, Harry T., C. S. C, 
Bureau Agriculture, Manila, 
P.I. 

Fletcher, Stevenson W., $K$, 
C. S. C, Blacksburg, Va., 
Director Virginia Agricultural 
Experiment Station. M. Sc, 
Cornell, 1898; Ph. D., Cornell, 
1900. 

Hammar, James F., C. S. C, 
Nashua, N. H., Farmer and 
Market Gardener. 

tHarper, Walter B., Q. T. V., 
address unknown. 

* Jones, Benjamin K., C. S. C, 
died August 21, 1903, at Spring- 
field, Mass. 

Kinney, Asa S., K 2, Mount 
Holyoke College, South Hadley, 
Mass., Floriculturalist and In- 
structor in Botany. M. Sc, 
Massachusetts Agricultural Col- 
lege. 

Kramer, Albin M., K 2, 171 
Boston Road. Business address, 
191 Liberty St., Springfield, 
Mass., Civil Engineer. 

fLeamy, Patrick A., address un- 
known. 

de Luce, Edmond, <£ 2 K, Oyster 
Bay, New York. Business ad- 
dress, 27 West 23d St., New 
York City, Manager with G. P. 
Putnam & Sons. 

Marshall, James L., C. S. C, 
6 Barnard Road, Worcester, 
Mass., with Osgood Bradley 
Car Co. 



1896 

Moore, Henry W., K 2, 28 Amherst 
St., Worcester, Mass., Farmer 
and Market Gardener. 

*Nichols, Robert P., D. G. K., 
Deceased. 

Nutting, Charles A., $ 2 K, West 
Berlin, Mass., Farmer. 

Pentecost, William L., D. G. K., 
Chapinville, Conn., Farm Super- 
intendent. 

Poole, Erford W., <P K <?>, K 2, 
North Dartmouth, Mass. Busi- 
ness address, P. O. Box 129, 
New Bedford, Mass., Estimator 
and Draughtsman. 

Poole, I. Chester, <t>K<S>, K 2, 

204 High St., Fall River, Mass., 
Osteopathic Physician. D. O., 
American School of Osteopathy, 
1904. 

Read, Frederick H., $ 2 K, Oak- 
lawn, R. I., Teacher. 

Roper, Harry H., C. S. C, 

Ipswich, Mass., Farm Manager. 

Saito, Seijiro, C. S. C, 12 Aoyama, 
Takagicho, Tokio, Japan, Pro- 
fessor of English Language in 
Nautical College. B. L., Nilson 
Law School, Tokio, 1907; Mas- 
ter's Degree, 1908. 

Sastre, Salome, D. G. K., Carden- 
as, Tabasco, Mexico, Sugar 
Planter and Manufacturer. 

Sellew, Merle E., $ 2 K, Walling- 

ford, Conn., Teacher. 

Shaw, Frederick B., D. G. K., 
Amherst, Mass., Farmer. 

Shepard, Lucius J., C. S. C, 
West Sterling, Mass., Farmer. 

Shultis, Newton, K 2, Winthrop 
St., Winchester, Mass. Busi- 
ness address, 601 Chamber of 
Commerce, Boston, Mass., Grain 
Dealer. 

tTsuda, George, <*> 2 K, 213 Hon- 

mura, Cho., Azabu, Tokio, 
Japan, Editor. 



32 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



1897 

NON-GRADUATES 

Curley, Walter James, Framing- 
ham, Mass., Physician. 

Day, Gilbert, 405 Green St., 
Cambridge, Mass. 

Dodge, William Bradford, Jamaica 
Plain, Mass. 

Geary, Hiram C, Pelham, Mass. 
Green, Josiah Elton, Berkeley, 
Cal., Real Estate. 

Hayward, Ralph L., Uxbridge, 

Mass. 

Kinsman, Ernest E., Heath, Mass. 
Farmer. 

Morse, Sidney L., 1210 Oakley 
Place, St. Louis, Mo., Author 
and Publisher. 

Rawson, Herbert W., Arling- 
ton, Mass., Market Gardener. 
*Scannell, Michael E. Deceased. 
Shurtleff, Walter D., Plymouth, 
Mass., Physician. 

Stoddard, Samuel H., Rockland, 

Mass. 

Vallentine, Florence M., Florence, 
Mass. 
IVaughan, Robert H., Worcester. 

Walsh, Thomas F., with Filene & 
Co., Boston. 

Washburn, Frank P., North Perry, 
Maine. 



1897 

C. A. Peters, Secretary. 

Allen, Harry F., C. S. C, Win- 
chester, Mass., Farmer. 

Allen, John W., C. S. C, North- 
boro, Mass., Market Gardener. 

Armstrong, Herbert J., 4> 2 K, 
11337 Crescent Ave., Morgan 
Park, 111., Assistant Professor of 
Civil Engineering, Armour In- 
stitute of Technology, Chicago. 



1897 



Barry, John M., $2K, 104 
Waltham St. Business address, 
509 Tremont St., Boston, Mass., 
Automobile Dealer. 

fBartlett, James L., * K $, Q. T. V., 

Salisbury, Mass., Farmer. 

Cheney, Liberty L., Q. T. V., 
322 Ellis St., Augusta, Ga., 
Veterinarian. M. D. V., Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, 1899. 

Clark, Lafayette F., C. S. C, 
312 North G. St., Oskaloosa, 
Iowa. Creamery Work. 

Drew, George A., *2K, Green- 
wich, Conn., Farm Manager. 

fEmrich, John A., Q. T. V., 
address unknown. 

Goessmann, Charles I., D. G. K., 
1015 Diamond St., Philadelphia, 
Pa., Chemist. 

Leavens, George D., $K$, $ 2 K, 
527 Second St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Business address, 651 Chambers 
St., New York City, President 
Coe-Mortimer Co. 

Norton, Charles A., $ 2 K, 30 
Grove St., West Lynn, Mass., 
Pianos and Piano Tuner. 

Palmer, Clayton F., C. S. C, 
1622 Bushnell Ave., South Pasa- 
dena, Cal., Supervisor of Agri- 
culture, Los Angeles City 
Schools. M. A., Leland Stan- 
ford University. 

Peters, Charles A., $ K 3>, C. S. C, 

Sunset Ave., Amherst, Mass., 
Associate Professor of Chemis- 
try, Massachusetts Agricultural 
College. Ph. D., Yale, 1901. 

Smith, Philip H,$2K, Amherst, 
Mass., Assistant Chemist, Mass- 
achusetts Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station. M. Sc, Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural College 
1911. 



ADDRESS LIST 



33 



1897 



NON-GRADUATES 



Allen, Edward B., Mt. Lebanon, 
N. Y., Farm Superintendent. 
tBarclay, Frederick W., address 
unknown. 

Birnie, Alexander C, Ludlow, 
Mass. 

Charmbury, Thomas H., Hanover, 
Pa., Dentist. 

Colby, Frederick William, Rox- 
bury, Mass. 

Coleman, Robert P., Richmond, 
Mass., Farmer. 

Cook, Maurice E., Shrewsbury, 
Mass., Florist and Market Gar- 
dener. 

Eddy, John Richmond, Lame- 
deer, Mont., Superintendent 
Indian Reservation. 

Falby, Francis R., Northboro, 
Mass. 

Farns worth, Robert L., Turners 
Falls, Mass., Mill Superinten- 
dent. 

Fitz, Austin H., Norwood, Mass., 
School Superintendent. 

Howe, Herbert F., North Cam- 
bridge, Mass. 

Hunter, Herbert C, South Natick, 

Mass. 

*King, Charles A. died April, 1896, 
at college. 

Mansfield, George R., 2242 Ridge 
Ave., Evanston, 111., Assistant 
Professor of Geology, North- 
western University. 

*Millard, Frank C, died July 11, 
1911. 

Nowell, Allen M., Honolulu, T.H., 
Manager Sugar Factory. 

Palmer, Edward D., Upland, 
Cal., Fruit Grower. 

Ranlett, Charles A., Billerica, 
Mass., Military Instructor in 
Boston High School. 

t Roberts, Percy C. 



1898 

Sherman, Carleton F., Jamaica 
Plain, Mass. 

Sherman, Harry C. Dartmouth, 

Mass. 

Stearns, Harold E., 496 Chestnut 
St., Arlington, N. J., Veterinary 
Surgeon. 

West, Harold L., Pullman, Wash. 

1898 

Adjemain, Aredis G., D. G. K., 
Adana, Eastern Turkey, care 
Rev. H. N. Barnum. 

Baxter, Charles N., C. S. C, 
Branford, Conn., Librarian 
Blackstone Memorial Library. 

Clark, Clifford G., D. G. K., 
Sunderland, Mass., Farmer. 

Eaton, Julian S., D. G. K., 
Nyack, N. Y. Business address 
141 Broadway, New York City, 
Chief Attorney Traveler's Insu- 
rance Co. LL. B., University 
of Minnesota, 1904. 

Fisher, Willis S., $SK, 24 Vine 
St., Melrose, Mass., Principal 
Lincoln Grammar School. 

Montgomery, Alexander W., C. S. 
C, Hadley, Mass., Florist. 

Nickerson, John P., Q. T. V., 
West Harwich, Mass., Physic- 
ian. M. D., Tufts Medical 
School, 1901. 

Warden, Randall D., *SK, 67 
Treacy St. Business address, 
City Hall, Newark, N. J., 
Director Physical Training, Pub- 
lic Schools. 

Wiley, Samuel W., K 2, Ruxton, 
Md. Business address, 15 South 
Gay St., Baltimore, Md., Wiley 
& Co., Analytical and Consulting 
Chemists. 

Wright, George H., $SK, 282 
McDonough St., Brooklyn, 
N. Y. Business address, care 
of Hornblower & Weeks, 42 
Broadway, Bookkeeper. 



34 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



1899 

NON-GRADUATES 

*Holt, Henry D. Died Aug. 5, 1896. 

Kinsman, Willard Quincy, Ipswich, 
Mass., Farmer. 

Thompson, Harris A., 3 Court- 
land St., Worcester, Mass. 
Foreman. 

Wolcott, Herbert R., 147 Euclid 
Ave., Springfield, Mass. Busi- 
ness. 



1899 

Dan A. Beaman, Secretary. 

Armstrong, William H., $SK, San 
Juan, Porto Rico, Captain in U. 
S. army. 

fBeaman, Dan A., Q. T. V., Rio 
Piedras, Porto Rico, Farm Su- 
perintendent. 

Chapin, William E., $2K, Port- 
land High School, Portland, Me. 
Teacher. 

Dana, Herbert W., C. S. C, 9 
Oliver St., Salem, Mass. Adver- 
tising Manager. 

Hinds, Warren E., $K$, C. S. C, 
Auburn, Ala., Professor of Ento- 
mology and Entomologist, Ala- 
bama Agricultural Experiment 
Station; Ph.D. Massachusetts 
Agricultural College, 1902. 

Hooker, William A, $ 2 K, 1829 
G St. Business address, Office 
of Experiment Stations, U. S. 
Dept. of Agriculture, Washing- 
ton, D. C. Assistant Editor 
Experiment Station Record. 

Hubbard, George C, $ 2 K, Sun- 
derland, Mass. Farmer. 

IMaynard, Howard E., C. S. C. 
Address unknown. 

tMerrill, Frederick A., Mount Ver- 
non, Ga. 



1899 

Pingree, Melvin H., C. S.C., Rux- 
ton, Md. Business address 2343 
S. Clinton St., Baltimore, Md. 
Chemist with American Agricul- 
tural Chemical Co. 

Smith, Bernard H., $ K <f», C.S.C., 

17 Beaumont St., Springfield, 
Mass. M. S., George Washing- 
ton Univ., 1903. L. L. B., Na- 
tional University, 1905. Chem- 
and Supt., Baker Extract Co. 

Smith, Samuel C, C. S. C, Hol- 

liston, Mass. Farmer. 

Turner, Frederick H., <S> K $, C.S. 

C, Great Barrington, Mass. 
Merchant. 

Walker, Charles M., C. S. C, 100 
West 90th St. Business address, 
110 East 23rd St., New York 
City. Manager Lantern Slide 
Dept., Charles Beseler Co. 



NON-GRADUATES 

Boutelle, Albert A., Wellesley 

Farms, Mass. Farm Manager. 

Chapman, John C, Stoughton, 
Mass. 

Courtney, Howard S., Greenport, 
Long Island, N. Y. Florist. 

Davis, John Alden, 36 Groveland 
St., Springfield, Mass. City 
Forester. 

Dickinson, Carl C, 204 Cottage 
Grove Ave., Santa Barbara, 
Cal. 

Dutcher, JohnR., Nyack, N. Y. 

fGile, Alfred D., Worcester. 

fKeenan, George F., Boston. 

Smith, Carl William, Melrose, 

Mass. 

Stacy, Clifford E., Claud, N. Mex. 
Wright, Edwin M., Manteno, 111. 



ADDRESS LIST 



35 



1900 

E. K. Atkins, Secretary 

Atkins, Edwin K., K 2, 15 Hub- 
bard Ave., Northampton, Mass. 
Civil Engineer. 

Baker, Howard, C. S. C, 6 Edge- 
wood St., Woodsdale, Wheel- 
ing, W. Va. Veterinarian. In- 
spector U. S. Bureau of Animal 
Industry. M. D. V., Univ. of 
Pennsylvania, 1902. 

Brown, F. Howard, K 2, Hosmer 
St., Marlboro, Mass. Farmer. 

tCampbell, Martin A., C. S. C. 
Address unknown. 

tCanto, Ysidro, D. G. K. Address 
unknown. 

Crane, Henry L., $2K, West- 
wood, Mass. Fruit Grower. 
*Felch, Percy F., C. S. C, died in 
North Hadley July 8, 1900. 
Frost, Arthur F., C.S.C., 23 Flat- 
bush Ave. Business address, 
1364 East 17th St., Brooklyn, 
N. Y. Civil Engineer. 

Gilbert, Ralph D., C. S. C, Mil- 
burne Road, Belmont, Mass. 
Business address, 43 Chatham 
St., Boston, Mass. Chemist 
and vice-president Bowker In- 
secticide Co. Ph.D. Yale, 1904. 

Halligan, James E., K 2, Box 246, 
Baton Rouge, La. Chemist 
State Experiment Station. 

♦Harmon, Arthur A., *K*, C.S.C., 
died November, 1910. 

Hull, Edward T.,*K*,C. S. C, 
2420 Seventh Ave., New York 
City. M. D., Columbia Univ., 
1904. Physician. 

Kellogg, James W., $ 2 K, 133 
Walnut St., Harrisburg, Pa. 
Chief Chemist Pennsylvania 
Dept. of Agriculture. 

Landers, Morris B., D. G. K., 599 
Seventh St. Business address, 
79 Washington Boulevard, De- 
troit, Mich; M. D., Detroit 
Medical College. Physician and 
Surgeon. 



1900 

tLewis, James F., <£ 2 K. Address 
unknown. 

Monahan, Arthur C, <i>K*,C.S.C, 
132 Bryant St. Business address, 
Bureau of Education, Washing- 
ton, D. C. Specialist in Agri- 
cultural Education. 

Morrill, Austin W., $2K, Phoenix, 
Ariz. Entomologist Arizona Hor- 
ticultural Commission and Agri- 
cultural Experiment Station. 
Ph.D., Massachusetts Agricul- 
tural College, 1903. 

Munson, Mark H., C. S. C, Hunt- 
ington, Mass. Farmer. 

Parmenter, George F, $ 2 K, Wat- 
erville, Me.Professor of Chemis- 
try Colby College. Ph.D., 
Brown Univ. 

Stanley, Francis G., Q. T. V., 144 
Cabot St., Beverly, Mass. M.D. 
Harvard University. Physician. 

tWest, Albert M., $ 2 K, Washing- 
ton, D. C, U. S. Department 
of Agriculture, Bureau of Ani- 
mal Industry. 



NON-GRADUATES 

Crowell, Charles A., Jr., Vine- 
yard Haven, Mass. School Su- 
perintendent. 

Crowell, Warner R., 26 Summer 
St., Everett, Mass. Real Es- 
tate. 

March, Allen L., Ashfield, Mass. 
Otis, Wilbur C, Beachmont.Mass. 
Risley, Clayton E., Plainfield,NJ. 
Rogers, William B., Cambridge, 

Mass. 
Sharpe, Edward H., 811 North 

Market St., Frederick, Md. 

Salesman. 

Walker, Henry E., Vineyard Ha- 
ven, Mass. 



36 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



1901 

J. H. Checkering, Secretary. 

Barry, John C..K2, 1195 Eastern 
Ave., Schenectady, N. Y. Elec- 
trical Engineer. 

Bridgeforth, George R., Tuskegee 
Institute, Tuskegee, Alabama. 
Teacher. 

Brooks, Percival C.,$2K, 1828 
Euclid Ave., Chicago Heights. 
Business address, 151 Twenty - 
second St., Chicago Heights, 
111. Assistant Superintendent 
General Chemical Co. 

Casey, Thomas, Q. T.V., 20 Claf- 
lin St., N. Leominster, Mass. 
Business address, 145 Main St. 
Lawyer. 

Chickering. James H.,<i>2K, Dover, 
Mass. Vice-president E. F. 
Hodgson Co. 

Cooke, Theodore F., C. S. C, 183 
Elm St., Pittsfield, Mass. 
Teacher of Mathematics, Pitts- 
field High School. 

Dawson, William A., C. S. C, 
Willimantic, Conn. Florist. 
IDickerman, William C, *2K, 
Address unknown. 

tGamwell, Edward S., C. S. C. Ad- 
dress unknown. 

Gordon, Clarence E. $ K $,C.S.C., 
Amherst, Mass. Associate Pro- 
fessor of Zoology and Geology, 
Massachusetts Agricultural Cal- 
lege. A. M., Columbia Univ., 
1905. Ph.D., Columbia Univ., 
1911. 

Graves, Thaddeus, Jr., $ 2 K, 
Hatfield, Mass. Farmer. 

Henry, James B., D. G. K., 288 
Sergeant St. Business address, 
50 State St., Hartford, Conn. 
L. L. B., Univ. of Michigan, 
1904. Lawyer. 
Hunting, Nathan J., C. S. C, 
Shutesbury, Mass. Farmer. 

Leslie, Charles T., C. S. C, 
86 North St., Pittsfield, Mass. 



1901 

. M. D., Columbia Univ., 1905. 
Physician. 
Macomber, Ernest L., <i> 2 K,West 

Barnstable, Mass. Station Agent. 

tOvalle, Julio, D. G. K. Address 
unknown. 

Pierson, Wallace R., 3> K $, K 2, 
Cromwell, Conn. Secretary and 
Assistant Treasurer of A. N. 
Pierson, Inc. Wholesale Florists. 

Rice, Charles L., C. S. C, 9 Cam- 
bridge Road, Lee, South East 
London, England. Works Man- 
ager Western Electric Co., N. 
Woolwich, Eng. 

Root, Luther A., $ 2 K, Amherst, 
Mass. Farmer. 

SchrafTrath, Max, Colinga, Cal. 
Superintendent Standard Oil 
Company. 

Smith, Ralph I., Q. T. V., Maya- 
guez, P. R. Professor Zoology 
and Entomology, College of 
Agriculture and Mechanic Arts. 

Tashjian, Dickran B., Q. T. V., 
Turner Hill, Ipswich, Mass. 
Landscape Gardener. 
tTodd, John H., Q. T. V., Rowley, 
Mass. 

Whitman, Nelson D., $ 2 K, 1938 
Cordova St. Business address, 
525 Central Building, Los An- 
gelos, Cal. Chief Engineer Re- 
inforced Concrete Pipe Co. 

Wilson, A. C, Phi Kappa Phi, 
* 2 K, First Nat. Bank Bldg, 
San Francisco, Cal. Civil En- 
gineer. 

NON-GRADUATES 

Baker, John Brown, Humboldt 
St., Union Hill, N. J. Teacher. 

Boutelle, Clarence A., Montgom- 
ery, Ala. 

Clarke, George Crowell, Maiden, 
Mass. 

Curtis, Ernest W., Canton, Mass. 

Dana, George Henry, Amherst, 
Mass. Farmer. 



ADDRESS LIST 



37 



1902 

Dorman, Allison R., 114 Mill St., 
New Bedford, Mass. Teacher. 

Greeley, Dana S. B., East Fox- 
boro, Mass. 

fGurney, Victor H. Address un- 
known. 

Hemenway, Francis E., Williams- 
ville, Mass. 

Howard, John H., Westford, 
Mass. Farmer. 

Jones, Clark Winthrop, Hunting- 
ton, Mass. 

Jones, Cyrus W., 151 Lexington 
Ave. ,Waverley, Mass. Student 
Harvard University. 

Judd, Warren H., South Hadley, 
Mass. Farmer. 

Moulton, Harry J., South Califor- 
nia Edison Co., Los Angeles, 
Cal. Salesman. 



1902 

H. L. Knight, Secretary. 

Belden, Joshua H.,$ 2 K, 1 Hous- 
ton-Fergus Court, Columbus, 
Ohio. Special Agent for Fidelity 
and Casualty Co., in charge of 
Southeastern Ohio. 

tBodfish, Henry L., D. G. K., 56 

Oliver St., Derby, Conn. Civil 
Engineer. 

Carpenter, Thorne M., $ K $, C. 
S. C, 103 Francis St., Roxbury, 
Mass. Business address, Nutri- 
tion Laboratory, Fenway, Bos- 
ton, Mass. Chemist for Car- 
negie Institute. 

*Church, Frederick R., C. S. C, 
died at Queens, Long Island, 
N. Y., March 17, 1910. 
Claflin, Leander C., ■ * 2 K, 3202 
Arch St., Philadelphia, Pa. Mer- 
chant. Business address. 1107 
Chestnut St. 

Cook, Lyman A., Q. T. V., Millis, 
Mass. Farmer. 



1902 

Cooley, Orrin F., 867 S. Clarkson 
St., Denver, Colo. Civil Engi- 
neer. 

Dacy, Arthur L., * K <i>, C. S. C, 
28 Buchanan Ave., Morgan- 
town, W. Va. Assistant Hor- 
ticulturist, West Virginia Agri- 
cultural Experiment Station. 

Dellea, John M., C. S. C, Great 
Barrington, Mass. Farmer. 

Dwyer, Chester E., C. S. C, Ne- 
braska City, Neb. Farm Mgr. 

Gates, Victor A., $ 2 K, Lonoke, 
Ark. With Gates Mercantile 
Co. 

Hall, John C., $ 2 K, South Sud- 
bury, Mass. Teacher. 

Hodgkiss, Harold E., C. S. C, 90 
Lyceum St., Geneva, N. Y. As- 
sistant Entomologist, N. Y. 
Agric. Experiment Station. 

IKinney, Charles M., $ 2 K, 450 
Roslyn Place ; business address, 
Francis Parker School, 330 
Webster Ave., Chicago, 111. 
Teacher of Music. 

Knight, Howard L.. * K $, C. S. 
C, 1420 Buchanan St.: business 
Office of Experiment Stations, 
U. S. Dept. of Agriculture, 
Washington, D. C. Assistant 
Editor, Experiment Station 
Record. 

Lewis, Claude I., C. S. C.Corval- 
lis, Ore., State Horticulturist 
and Professor of Horticulture, 
Oregon State University and 
Agricultural Experiment Sta- 
tion. M. Sc. Agr.. Cornell Uni- 
versity, 1906. 

Morse, Ransom W., Q. T. V., 9 
June St.; business address, Wor- 
cester Telegram, Worcester, 
Mass. M. Sc, Dartmouth, 
1907. Journalist. 

IPaul, Herbert A., C. S. C, Tie 
Plant, Ark., Civil Engineer 
Rock Island Railroad. 



38 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



1903 

tPlumb, Frederic H., D. G. K., 7 
Elm Grove St., South Norwalk, 
Conn. Salesman. 

Saunders, Edward B., D. G. K., 
Nashua, N. H. Manager for 
Swift & Co. 

Smith, S. LeRoy, C. S. C, 73 
Parkhurst St., business address 
107 Halsey St., Newark, N. J. 
Y. M. C. A. Secretary. 
tWest, D. Nelson, Q. T. V., Ros- 
lyn, Long Island, N. Y. Civil 
Engineer. 

NON-GRADUATES 

Adams, Edward E., Millis, Mass. 
*Ball, George Tread well, died Mar. 
15, 1910. 

Chapin, Warren L.,Amherst,Mass. 

Chase, William J., Lynn, Mass. 

Cole, William R., Deerfield, Mass. 
Teacher. 

Greenman, Fred EL, Haverhill, 
Mass. 

Hanlon, Harold C, N. Easton, 

Mass. 

Holder, Walter S., Chelmsford, 
Mass. Farmer. 

f James, Harold F., Boston. 

f James, Hubert C, Boston. 

McCobb, Edmond F., Milford, 
Mass. 

Peabody, Harry E., 807 Warren 
Ave., Brockton, Mass. Postal 
Clerk. 

Walker, Alpheus H., Millbrook, 
Mass. Farmer. 

Warden, James K., 522 W. 36th 
St., New York City. Contrac- 
tor. 



1903 

Gerald D. Jones, Secretary. 

Allen, William E., <J> 2 K, Ad- 
dress unknown. 



1903 

Bacon, Stephen C, K 2, 64 Rut- 
gers Ave., Jersey City, N. J., 
Civil Engineer. 

Barrus, George L., K2, Lithia, 
Mass., Farmer. 

tBowen, Howard C, Q. T. V., 
Address unknown. 

tBrooks, Philip W., Q. T. V., Im- 
perial, Cal., Farmer. 
Cook, Joseph G., $ K $, C. S. C, 
Hadley, Mass., (Amherst R. F. 
D.,) Farmer. 

Franklin, Henry J., <t> K 3>, Q.T.V., 
Amherst, Mass., in charge of 
Cranberry Investigation, Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station ; Ph. D., Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural College, 
1908. 

Halligan, Charles P., K 2, East 
Lansing, Mich., Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Horticulture, Michigan 
Agricultural College. 

Harvey, Lester F., C. S. C, Rom- 
ford, Conn., Farmer. 

Hood, William L., Boley, Okla., 
Principal Buckeye School. 

Jones, Gerald D., Q. T. V., North 
Amherst, Mass., Farm Superin- 
tendent. 

Lamson, George H., Jr., C. S. C, 
Storrs, Conn., Professor of 
Zoology, Connecticut Agricultur- 
al College; M. Sc, Yale 1905. 

tMonahan, Neil F., C. S. C, South 

Framingham, Mass. 
tNersessian, Paul N., Marash, 

Turkey. 

Osmun, A. Vincent, $ K 3>, 
Q. T. V., Amherst, Mass., As- 
sistant Professor of Botany, 
Massachusetts Agricultural 

College; M. Sc, Massachusetts 
Agricultural College, 1905. 

Parsons, Albert, Q. T. V., Dover, 
Mass., Farm Supt. 

tPeebles, W.W., Address unknown. 



ADDRESS LIST 



39 



1903 

Poole, Elmer M., K 2, North 
Dartmouth, Mass., Farmer. 

tProulx, Edward G,$2K, Lafay- 
ette, Ind., Chemist, Indiana 
Agricultural Experiment Station; 
M. Sc. Agr., Purdue University, 
1909. 

^Robertson, R.H..K2, died Sept. 
10, 1904, at Amherst, Mass. 
Snell, Edward B., Q. T. V., 24 
High St., Business address, 42 
Church St., New Haven, Conn., 
Civil Engineer. 
Tinkham, Charles S., D. G. K., 
126 Thornton Street, Roxbury, 
Mass., Civil Engineer for 
Massachusetts Highway Com- 
mission. 

Tottingham, William E., <i> K $, 
Q. T. V., Madison, Wis., Pro- 
fessor and Research Assistant 
in Agricultural Chemistry, 
College of Agriculture, Univer- 
sity of Wisconsin ; M. Sc, 
University of Wisconsin, 1908. 
t Tower, Winthrop V., $ S K, San 
Juan, Porto Rico, Entomologist 
Porto Rico Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station. 

West, Myron H., Q. T. V. 27 
Linden Court, Business address 
140 South Dearborn St., Chica- 
go, 111., President American 
Park Builders, Inc. 



NON-GRADUATES 

f Allen, Lilly Bertha. Address 
unknown. 

Blake, Ernest E., GUI, Mass. 

fBowler, Patrick H. Address un- 
known. 

Carmody, John F., Bondsville, 

Mass. 

Cheever, Herbert M., West 
Boylston, Mass. 

Dillon, James H., Belchertown, 

Mass. 



1904 

Harris., Frederick A., R. F. D., 

Amherst, Mass. 
Higgins, Willis E., Winchester, 

Mass. 
Kelly, Herbert T., Bellows Falls, 

Vt., Secretary Robertson Paper 

Company. 
Martin, Henry T., Fearing St., 

Amherst, Mass., Express Clerk. 
Parsons, Josiah W., 128 Bridge 

St., Northampton, Mass. 
Perkins, Edward L. ; 34 Eaton St., 

Winchester, Mass., Salesman. 
Phelps, Arthur A., Southboro, 

Mass. 
Phillips, Lee, Terrace Ave., Car- 
negie, Pa., Salesman. 
Potter, Roland D., Rutland, Mass. 
Richardson, Harlan L., 58 Main 

St., Winter Hill, Mass., Bac- 
teriologist and Chemist. 
Thompson, Leslie I., Allenton, 

R. I., Fruit Grower. 
Tinker, Clifford A., 43 Main 

St., Westfield, Mass., Architect 

and Engineer. 
Vance, Phillip G., 22 Allen St., 

Bradford, Mass., Pattern Maker. 
Webster, Frank W., 180 Union St., 

Springfield, Mass. 
Wollheim, Ernest, Jersey City, 

N. J. 



1904 

P. F. Staples, Secretary. 

Ahearn, Michael F., C. S. C, 507 
Laramie St., Manhattan, Kan., 
Ass't Professor of Horticulture, 
Kansas Agricultural College. 

Back, Ernest A., * K.$, C. S. C, 

Honolulu, T. H., Entomologist, 
U. S. Department of Agricul- 
ture, Ph., D., Massachusetts 
Agricultural College, 1907. 



40 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



1904 

Blake, Morris A., Q. T. V., 124 
Hamilton St. New Brunswick, 
N. J., Horticulturist, New Jersey 
Agricultural Experiment Station. 

Couden, Fayette D.,3> K 4>, $ 2 K, 

424 First St., South Bend, 
Washington, Lawyer. 

Elwood, Clifford F., K. 2., 2009 
Vallejo St., San Francisco, Cal., 
Contractor. 

Fulton, Erwin S., C. S. C, North 
Amherst, Mass., Farmer. 

Gilbert, Arthur W., $ K $, C.S.C., 
Ithaca, N. Y., Professor of Plant 
Breeding, Cornell University ; 
M. Sc. Agr., Cornell University, 
1905 ; Ph. D., Cornell Univer- 
sity, 1909. 

Gregg, John W., C. S. C, Univ. 
California, Berkeley, California, 
Prof, of Landscape Gardening. 

Griffin, Clarence H., $> 2 K, 1864 
Park Road, Washington, D. C, 
Bacteriologist, Chapin - Sachs 
Manufacturing Company ; M. 
D., George Washington Univer- 
sity, 1909. 

Haskell, Sidney B., $ K <i>, C.S.C., 

5 Fearing St., Amherst, Mass., 
AssociateProfessor of Agronomy, 
Massachusetts Agricultural Col- 
lege. 

Henshaw, Fred F., <i> K $, C.S.C., 
801 Kelley St., Business ad- 
dress 208 Telford Building, 
Portland, Oregon, District En- 
gineer U. S. Geological Survey. 

Hubert, Zachary T., President 
Jackson College, Jackson, Miss. 

Newton, Howard D., C. S. C, 
Head of Department of Chemis- 
try, Connecticut Agricultural 
College, Storrs, Conn. 

tO'Hearn, George E., C. S. C, 

Pittsfield, Mass. 
Parker, Sumner R., C. S. C, 
Hard wick, Mass., Farmer. 



1904 

Peck, Arthur L., $ K $., C. S. C, 

College Crest, Corvallis, Oregon, 
Teacher Landscape Gardening 
and Floriculture, Oregon State 
College. 

Quigley, Raymond A., C. S. C, 
3006 Rockefeller Ave , Business 
address 406 Commerce Build- 
ing, Everett, Washington, M. 
D., Harvard Medical School, 
Physician. 

tRaymouth, R. Raymond, K 2, 
Tacoma, Wash. 

Staples, Parkman F., C. S. C, 
North Grafton, Mass., Farmer. 

White, Howard M., $ K $, $ 2 K, 
Hilton, N. Y., Farmer. 



NON-GRADUATES 

Baker, Perez R., 24 Gray St., Am- 
herst, Mass., Farmer. 

Collins, Joseph D., Northampton, 

Mass. 

Copeland, William Wallace, 
Townsend, Mass. 

Cummings, John F., Brockton, 

Mass. 

Ellsworth, Frank L., 356 Dwight 
St., Holyoke, Mass. 

*Esip, Edward Thomas, Deceased. 

Fahey, John J., 16 Myrtle St., 

Pittsfield, Mass., Postal Clerk. 

Graves, George A., Northampton, 

Mass. 
Haffenreffer, Adolf F., 866 Davol 

St., Fall River, Mass., Brewer. 
Handy, Robert S., Cataumet, 

Mass., Farmer. 

Hill, Louis W. B., Greenfield Hill, 

Conn. 
Kelleher, Justin, Brockton, Mass. 

Kirby, Daniel Webster, Thomp- 
son, Conn. 

Paul, Augustus Russell, Belvidere, 
N. J., Fruit Grower. 



ADDRESS LIST 



41 



1905 

Pease, James Arthur, R. F. D. 
9, Fairfield, Conn. Real Es- 
tate. 

Pierce, Hervey C, Millbury, 
Mass., Merchant. 

Richardson, Charles H., Boxboro, 
Mass. 

Ryan, Arthur, North Hadley, 
Mass. 

Sawin, Ralph Dana, Pembroke, 
Mass. 

Smith, Walter Abbe, Springfield. 

Thompson, Clarence L., South 
Natick, Mass. 

Witherell, George A., Warwick, 
Mass. 

Witt, Henry H., Federal St., 
Belchertown, Mass. 

1905 

A. D. Taylor, Secretary. 

Adams, Richard L., <£ K <£, Messina 
Hotel, Bakersfield, California, 
Business address, Buttonwillow, 
California, Ranch Manager. 

Allen, G. Howard, <S> 2 K, High- 
land, Santa Bernardino Co., 
California, General Fruit Grow- 
ing. 

Barnes, Hugh L., C. S. C, Inter- 
laken, Stockbridge, Mass., 
Farmer. 

Bartlett, Frank A, $ 2 K, Hope 
St., Glenbrook, Conn., Business 
address, 262 Atlantic St., Stam- 
ford, Conn., President and 
Treasurer Frost and Bartlett Co. 

Crosby, Harvey, D., Q. T. V., 
Princeton, Mass., Farm Supt. 

Cushman, Miss Esther C, $ K <£, 
21 Brown St., Providence, R. I., 
Assistant at Ammary Brown 
Memorial. 

Gardner, John J., C. S. C, Univ. 
Illinois, Urbana, 111., Instructor 
in Horticulture and Graduate 
Student. 



1905 

Gay, Ralph P.. * S K, 316 West 
Front St., Plainfield, N J., 
Forester. 

Hatch, Walter B., C. S C, Warren, 
R. I., Business address, Nayatt 
Point, R. I., Supt., R. I. Coun- 
try Club. 

Holcomb, C. Sheldon, K 2., 153 
Hemenway St., Boston, Mass., 
Teacher of Voice and Public 
Speaking. 

Hunt, Thomas F., C. S. C, Berke- 
ley, Cal., Assistant Plant 
Pathologist, University of Cali- 
fornia, 
f Ingham, Norman D., C. S. C, 
Santa Monica, Cal., Silvi- 
culturalist. 

Kelton, J. Richard, K 2, 34 Pearl 
Street, Amsterdam, N. Y., 
Teacher Amsterdam High 
School. 

tLadd, Edward T., K 2, 609 Falls 
Road Terraces, Roland Park, 
Md., Chemist, Baugh Chemical 
Company; M. Sc, Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College, 1907. 

tLewis, Clarence W., Q T. V., 28 
Albine Street, Melrose High- 
lands, Mass. 

Lyman, John F., $ K $, K 2, 1345 
Highland Street, Columbus, 
' Ohio, Associate Professor of 
Agricultural Chemistry, Ohio 
State University ; Ph. D., Yale 
University, 1909. 

Munson, Willard A., $ K <t>, $ 2 K, 
Littleton, Mass., Fruit Grower. 

Newhall, Edwin W., Jr., D. G. K., 
260 California Street, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal., Farmer. 

Patch, G. Willard, <i> K $, $ 2 K, 
Rangeley Road, Arlington, 
Mass., Purchasing Agent for 
Brown Durrell Co., Boston. 

Sanborn, Monica L., (Mrs. William 
O. Taft), * K 4>, R. F. D., No. 
4, Northfield, Vt. 



42 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



1905 

Sears, William M., <E> 2 K, Elm 
St., Glenbrook, Conn., Business 
address, 262 Atlantic St., Stam- 
ford, Conn., Sales Manager 
Frost & Bartlett Co. 

Swain, Allen N., <f> 2 K., 15 Merlin 
St., Dorchester, Mass., Business 
address, Tremont Building, Bos- 
ton, Mass., Horticulturalist. 

Taylor, Albert D,$K$,C.S.C, 
1101 Tremont Building, Boston, 
Mass., Superintendent for War- 
ren H. Manning, Landscape 
Architect : M. Sc, Agr., Cornell 
University. 

Tompson, Harold F., $ K $, K 2, 
R. F. D. No. 4, Attleboro, 
Mass., Market Gardener. 

Tupper, Bertram, <£ K <£, K 2, 
Venice, Cal., Dairying. 

Walker, Lewell S., A 2 $, 19 
Phillips St., Amherst, Mass., 
Assistant Chemist, Massachu- 
setts Agricultural Experiment 
Station. 

Whitaker, Chester L., $2K, 46 
Second Ave., Pelham, N. Y., 
President Munson Whitaker 
Company, 4th Ave. Bldg., New 
York, Commercial and Land- 
scape Foresters. 
♦Williams, Percy F., K 2, died 
December 4, 1912, at Auburn, 
Ala. 

Willis, Grenville N.,#K*,*2K, 

82 Bromfield Road, West Somer- 
ville, Mass. Business address, 
15 Ashburton Place, Boston, 
Mass., Civil Engineer for Massa- 
chusetts Highway Commission. 

Yeaw, Frederick L., * 2 K, Ros- 
well, New Mexico, Manager 
Oasis Ranch. 

NON-GRADUATES 

Belden, William Lucius, Brockton, 

Mass. 
Brett, Clarence E., Kingston, 

R. I. 



1905 

Brigham, Fred W., Ashburnham, 

Mass. 

Bruce, Ernest C, School St., 
Somerville, Mass. 

Carter, Chester M., Barre, Mass., 

Florist. 
Goodenough, Herbert H., Saratoga 

Springs, N. Y. 

Graves, Edwin L., Hatfield, Mass- 

*Hamblin, John H., died March 20, 
1905. 

Huntington, Raymond E., Willow 
St., Wollaston, Mass., Adver- 
tising Manager. 

Knight, John H., Middletown, 
Mass. 

Ladd, Joseph, Jr., S3 Riverside 
St., Watertown, Mass. 

Lyman, Richard R., Montague, 
Mass., Farmer. 

Merrill, Charles E., Jr., 421 Essex 
St., Salem, Mass., with H. P. 
Hood & Sons. 

O'Neil, William J., 11 Grant St., 
Beverly, Mass., Pattern Maker. 

*Peck, Louis E., died early in 1912. 

Porter, Charles A., 52 Hancock 
St., Boston, Mass. 

Ransehousen, Lyman A., 29 Sher- 
man St., Springfield, Mass., 
Insurance. 

Rhodes, Elmer E., 36 Linden Ave., 
North Attleboro, Mass., Farmer. 

Richardson, Justus C, 701 Mam- 
mothe Road, Dracut, Mass.. 
Market Gardener. 

Smith, Robert E., South Hadley 
Falls, Mass. Farmer. 

Sprague, Charles E., West Spring- 
field, Mass. 

Straw, Harold D., Guilford, Me., 
Farmer. 

Sykes, Charles S., 30 Field St., 
West Springfield, Mass., Motor- 
man. 

Tinkham, Henry B., Touisset, 
Mass., Market Gardener. 



ADDRESS LIST 



43 



1906 

Walsh, Thomas F., Shirley St., 
Ayer, Mass., Traveling Sales- 
man. 

Williams, Franklin K., Collins- 
ville, Conn. 



1906 

Richard Wellington, Secretary. 

Carey, Daniel H., Q. T. V., 
Blythe, Riverside Co., Cal., 
Nurseryman. 

Carpenter, Charles W.,*K$,KS, 
Monson, Mass., Farmer. 

Craighead, William H., 10 South 
Court Ave., Harrisburg, Pa., 
Editor. 

Filer, Harry B., 82 University 
Ave. Business address, 13 City 
Hall, Buffalo, N. Y., City 
Forester. 

French, Talbot G., * K <£>, $ 2 K, 
102 East Franklin St. Business 
address, 1103 East Main St., 
Richmond, Va., State Seed 
Expert. 

Gaskill, Edwin F., C. S. C, 
Amherst, Mass., Assistant Agri- 
culturalist, Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural Experiment Station. 

Hall, Arthur W., Jr., * 2 K, 
North Amherst, Mass., Lawyer. 

Hastings, Addison T., Jr., Q. T. V., 
168 Grant Ave. Business ad- 
cress, City Hall, Jersey City, 
N. J., City Forester, Secretary 
of Shade Tree Commission. 

*Hood, Clarence E., Q. T. V., died 
June 18, 1912, at Champaign, 
111. 

Kennedy, Frank H., C. S. C, 
33 Goddard Road. Business 
address, City Hall, Brockton, 
Mass., Analyst for Brockton 
Sewage Commission. 

fMartin, J. Edward, C. S. C, 
Leadville, Colo., U. S. Forest 
Service. 



1906 

Moseley, Louis H., C. S. C.,. 

Glastonbury, Conn., Farmer. 

Mudge, Everett P., K 2, 69 
Cherry St., Swampscott, Mass., 
Tree Warden. 

Peaks, Ralph W., Q. T. V., 7 
Walnut St., Newtonville, Mass., 
Chemist with Cochran Chemical 
Co., Boston. 

Pray, F. Civille, * 2 K, Trinidad r 
Cuba. Summer address, Am- 
herst, Mass., Chemist and Sup- 
erintendent Trinidad Sugar 
Company. 

Rogers, Stanley S., $ K <fy K 2 r 
Whittier, Cal., Assistant Plant 
Pathologist University of Cali- 
fornia. 

Russell, Harry M.,$K$ ( C. S. C.,. 
Bureau of Entomology, U. S. 
Department of Agriculture, 
Washington, D. C. 

Scott, Edwin H., $ K <£>, K 2,. 
Millidgeville, Ga., Professor of 
Agriculture and Biology, Georgia 
Normal and Industrial College. 

Sleeper George W., * K $, C. S. C., 
Kendal Green, Mass., Farmer. 
Business address, 63 South St., 
Boston, Mass., Leather Business. 

f Strain, Benjamin, Q. T. V., 
Maybrook,' N. Y., Assistant 
Civil Engineer, Central New 
England Railroad. 
Suhlke, Herman A., K 2, 273 
Biddle Ave., Wyandotte, Mich., 
with Pennsylvania Salt Manu- 
facturing Company. 

Taft, William O., C. S. C, 

R. F. D. No. 4, Northfield, Vt., 

Farmer. 
Tannatt, Willard C, Jr., <E» K 4> t 

C. S. C, Easthampton, Mass., 

Town Engineer. 

Tirrell, Charles A., Q. T. V., 
1481 Irving Park Boulevard, 
Chicago, 111. Business address, 
815 Steinway Hall, Landscape 
Engineer. 



44 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



1906 

Wellington, Richard, # K <fr, Q. T. 
V., Geneva, N. Y., Horticul- 
turalist, New York Agricultural 
Experiment Station. M. Sc, 
Harvard, 1911. 
tWholley, Francis D., Q. T. V., 
North Scituate, Mass. 

Wood, Alexander H. M., K 2, 
Eastondale, Mass., Farmer. 



NON-GRADUATES 

Abbott, Chester D., Andover 
Mass., Milk Dealer. 

Bacon, Roland A., 144 N. 18th St., 
Boston, Mass., Window Trim- 
mer. 

Baird, Clarence H., Holyoke, 
Mass. 

Brydon, Robert P., Lake Forest, 
111., Gardener. 

Colton, William W., 30 Mountain 
Ave., Fitchburg, Mass., City 
Forester and Park Superintend- 
ent. 

Connely, Thomas H., 52 Snowhill 
St., Boston, Mass. 

Cowles, Edward R., Deerfield, 
Mass., Farmer. 

Parrar, Allen D., Box 45, Milford, 
Mass., General Secretary Y. M. 
C. A. 

Perren, Frank A., Peabody, Mass. 

Poster, Samuel C, 100 Chestnut 
St., Boston, Mass. 

•Goodale, Ray Coit, Sufneld, Conn., 

Farmer. 
Hay ward, Afton S., South Am- 
herst, Mass. 
Hersen, Elbert W., Waukegan, 

111. 
Jones, Louis F., Somerville, Mass. 

*Keith, Earl Wads worth, died in 
July, 1906, at North Easton, 
Mass. 
Mahoney, Francis W., 21 Bailey 
St., Boston, Mass. 



1907 

Markham, Joseph, Ayer, Mass. 

Morse, Stanley F., Northborot 
Mass., Consulting Agricultural- 
ist Expert and Farmer. 

Prenn, Joseph, Amherst, Mass. 

Racicot, Arthur A., Jr., Lieuten- 
ant U. S. N., U. S. N. D., 
Washington, D. C. 

Russell, Herbert O., North Hadley, 
Mass., Farmer. 

*Shannon, Alonzo H., Deceased. 

Spurr, Fred Yerxa, Melrose High- 
lands, Mass. 

Stevens, Fred O., Nashua, N. H. 

Sullivan, Patrick F., Amherst, 

Mass. 
Webb, Paul, 42 Church St., 

New Haven, Conn., Insurance. 

White, Vernon Ollis, 219 South 
Main St., Attleboro, Mass., 
Jeweller. 



1907 

Clinton King, Secretary. 

* Armstrong, Arthur H., K2, died 

December 22, 1908. 
Bartlett, Earle G., $ K <i>, <t> S K, 
Kamehameha Schools, Honolulu, 
T. H., Instructor in Science and 
Mathematics. 

Carathers, John T., R. F. D. No. 6, 
Columbia, Tenn. 

fChace, Wayland F., C. S. C, 
Address Unknown. 

Chapman, George, H., A 2 <i>, 
Amherst, Mass., Assistant Bot- 
anist, Massachusetts Agricultur- 
al Experiment Station. M. Sc, 
Massachusetts Agricultural Col- 
lege, 1910. 

Chapman, Joseph O., K2, 18 
Stevens St., North Andover, 
Mass., Farmer. 

Clark, Milford H., Jr., C. S. C, 
City Hall, Buffalo, N. Y., 
Assistant City Forester. 



ADDRESS LIST 



45 



1907 

Cutter, Frederick A., $2K, 40 
Elm St., Orange, N. J., Forester. 

Dickinson, Walter E.,«f> K $, $ 2 K, 
1308 Nashville Ave., New Or- 
leans, La., Sugar Chemist. 

Eastman, Jasper F., $ K <i>, Mor- 
risville, N.Y., Agronomist, New 
York State School of Agriculture. 
M. Sc, University of Illinois, 
1910. 

Hartford, Archie A., New Boston, 
N. H., Principal New Boston 
High School. 

Higgins, Arthur W., $ K $, K 2, 
Westfield, Mass., Florist. 

King, Clinton, $ K $, Q. T. V., 
28 Sagamore St., Dorchester, 
Mass. Business address, Rooms 
611-613, 6 Beacon St., Boston, 
Mass., Lawyer. LL. B., Boston 
University, 1910. 

Livers, Miss Susie D., 63 Dana 
St., Cambridge Mass., with 
Ginn & Co., Publishers, Boston, 
Mass. 

Parker, Charles M., $ K <S>, Q. T. 
V., Brookfield, Mass., Farmer. 

Peters, Frederick C, * 2 K, Ard- 
more, Pa., Landscape Forester 
and Entomologist. 

Shaw, Edward H., $ 2 K, 275 
Washington St., Belmont, Mass., 
Market Gardener. 

Summers, John N., C. S. C, 
Melrose Highlands, Mass., Bur- 
eau of Entomology, U. S. 
Department of Agriculture. Ph. 
D., Massachusetts Agricultural 
College, 1911. 

Thompson, Clifford B., * 2 K, 
Selama, Perak, Malay, Manager 
Rubber Plantation. 

Walker James, H., $ 2 K, 65 
Mapes Ave. Business address, 
City Hall, Newark, N. J., City 
Forester. 

Watkins, Fred A., $ 2 K, West 
Millbury, Mass., Market Gar- 
dener. 



1907 

Watts, Ralph J., $K$, $SK, 
Amherst, Mass., Secretary to 
the President Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 

Wood, Herbert P., C. S. C, 
Box 208, Dallas, Texas, Bureau 
of Entomology, U. S. Depart- 
ment of Agriculture. 



NON-GRADUATES 

Amsden, Eugene C, Gardner,. 

Mass. 

Arimoto, Shintarc, Furumachi,. 
Mimasaka, Japan, Agricultural- 
ist. 

Chadwick, Clifton H. 

*Chapman, William S., Deceased. 

Clementson, Lewis T., 105 Fairfield 
St., Worcester, Mass., Clerk. 

Curtis, Jesse Gerry, 321 Coltart 
Sq., Pittsburgh, Pa., Assistant 
City Forester. 

Curtis, Walter L., Scituate, Mass. 

Dearth, George A., Sherborn,. 
Mass. Real Estate. 

Denham, Edwin T., Halifax, Mass. 

Dudley, Fred S., Toledo, Ohio,. 
(505 St. Claire St.) 

Engstrom, Nils, 16 Whipple St.,. 
Worcester, Mass. 

fFinkelstein, David. Address un- 
known. 

fFrench, Vida R. Address un- 
known. 

Gould, Harry W., Millbury, Mass.,. 
Construction Reporter. 

Green, Herbert H., Spencer, Mass., 

Florist. 
Hall, Walton, Jr., Moodus, Conn., 

Manufacturer. 
Hanson, Stuart W., Roxbury,. 

Mass., (73 Munroe St.) 
Jones, Arthur M., Ludlow, Mass. 
tKalina, Jacob. Address unknown. 
Knox, Harry C, Wellesley, Mass.. 



46 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



1908 

Lanigan, William J., Rockland, 

Mass. 
Leighton, Carl, Lowell, Mass. 
Leominster, William, Acushnet 

Station, New Bedford, Mass., 

Chauffeur. 
"Lincoln, Ernest A., Fall River, 

Mass. 
Marran, Bernerd J., Great Bar- 

rington, Mass., Electrical Tester. 
-♦Perkins, Edward C, died June 20, 

1904. 
Pierce, Henry T., Millbury, Mass. 
Pray, Rutledge P., Natick, Mass. 
Raitt, John A., 524 W. 123d St., 

New York City. 
Rice, Charles A. A., Springfield, 

Mass., (146 Bowles St.) 
dearie, George W., 21 Kellogg St., 

Westfield, Mass., Clerk of Court, 

Newspaper Reporter. 
:Shaw, Chester L., 88 Pearl St., 

Middleboro, Mass., Clerk. 

.Shaw, Frank E., 626 Crescent St., 
Brockton, Mass., Foreman. 

Shuttleworth, Edwin L., Lawrence, 
Mass., (30 Summer St.) 

Smith, George F., Barre, Mass., 
Farmer. 

.Stoddard, Calder S., Canton,Mass. 

"Whitney, John F., 13 Perkins St., 
St. Johnsbury, Vt., Civil Engin- 
eer. 

1908 

James A. Hyslop, Secretary. 

t Allen, Charles F., C. S. C, 
General Delivery, Sioux City, 
Iowa, Salesman. 
Alley, Harold E., K 2, Box 62, 
Spreckels, Cal., Assistant Plant 
Pathologist, Spreckels Sugar 
Experiment Station. 
.Anderson, John A., * 2 K, Mont- 
clair, N. J., Forester, Shade 
Tree Commisision. 



1908 

* Anderson, Kenneth F., died May, 
1911, in Philippine Islands. 
Bailey, Ernest W., $ K <i>, K 2, 
605 Michigan Ave., Urbana, 
111., Associate in Pomology and 
Plant Breeding, University of 
Illinois. M. Sc, University of 
Illinois, 1909. 

Bangs, Bradley W., C.S. C, Car- 
teret, N. J., Chemist, American 
Chemical Co. 

fBarry, Thomas A., $ K <S>, C. S. C, 

Schenectady, N. Y., General 
Electric Company. 

Bartholomew, Miss Persis, West- 
boro, Mass., Farmer. 

fBates, Carlton, K2, 1628 Colum- 
bia Road, Washington, D. C, 
Bacteriologist, Bureau of Chem- 
istry, U. S. Department of 
Agriculture. 

Chapman, Lloyd W., Q. T. V., 
724 4th Ave. North, Great Falls, 
Montana, Assay er and Chemist. 

Chase, Henry C, C. S. C, 
Swampscott, Mass. Business 
address, State St., Lynn, Mass. 

Clark, Orton L., *2K, Amherst, 
Mass. 

Cobb, George R., C. S. C, 
Kingston, R. L, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Horticulture and Ath- 
letic Director, R. I. College of 
Agriculture and Mechanic Arts. 

fColeman, William J., C. S. C, 
1182 Broad St. Business ad- 
dress, City Hall, Newark, N. J., 
Shade Tree Commission. 

fCummings, Winthrop A., Q. T. V., 
721 Belden Ave., Chicago, 111., 
Foreman Lincoln Park. 

Cutting, Roy E., $2K, 33 Phillips 

St., Providence, R. I., Salesman. 

Daniel, John, <f> K $, Q. T. V., 

West Barnstable, Mass., Farmer. 

Davenport, S. Lothrop, * K <£, 
K 2, North Grafton, Mass., 
Fruit Grower. 



ADDRESS LIST 



47 



1908 

Davis, Paul A., $ K $, $, 
100 Canton St., Lowell, Mass. 

Dolan, Clifford, Windsorville, Me., 
Farmer. 

Eastman, Perley M., 84 Jefferson 
St., Albany, N. Y., Assistant 
Inspector New York State De- 
partment of Agriculture. 

Edwards, Frank L., * 2 K, Bucks- 
port, Me., Teacher and Farm 
Superintendent. 

Farley, Arthur J., Q. T. V., 
New Brunswick, N. J., Assistant 
Horticulturalist, New Jersey 
Agricultural Experiment Sta- 
tion. 

fFarrar, Park W., K 2, Rogerson, 
Idaho, Civil Engineer, Salmon 
River Dam. 

fFlint, Clifton L., K 2, Corvalis, 
Ore., Instructor in Landscape 
Gardening Oregon Agricultural 
College. 

Gillett, Chester S., $ K <f>, K S, 
Box 244, Salinas, Cal., Experi- 
ment Station. 

Gillett, Kenneth E,$K$,<[»SK I 
Southwick, Mass., Nurseryman. 

Gowdey, Carlton C, <t> K $, C. S. 
C, Entebbe, Uganda, British 
East Africa, Government Ent- 
omologist. 

Hayes, Herbert K., <S> K <i>, K 2, 

63 Canner St. Business address, 
Connecticut Agricultural Exper- 
iment Station, New Haven, 
Conn., Plant Breeder. 

Howe, William E., Marlboro, 
Mass., Farmer. 

Hutchings, Frank F., Q. T. V., 
Old Saybrook, Conn., Teacher. 

Hyslop, James A., Q. T. V.,860 
North Mulberry St., Hagerstown 
Md., Bureau of Entomology, 
U. S. Department of Agriculture. 
M. Sc, Washington State Col- 
lege, 1911. 



1908 

Jackson, Raymond H., $ 2 K, 
Amherst, Mass. Merchant. 

Jennison, Harry M., C. S. C, 
722 Grant Ave., Bozeman, 
Mont., Teacher of Botany, 
Montana State College. 

Johnson, Fred A., C. S. C, 
Washington, D. C, Bureau of 
Entomology, U. S. Department 
of Agriculture. 

Jones, Thomas H., <f> K $, Q. T. V., 

Experiment Station, Rio Pied- 
ras, P. R., Entomologist. 

Larned, Adelbert J. Q. T. V., 
Lyonsville, Mass., Farmer. 

Larsen, L. David, $ K <£, K 2, 
Honolulu, T. H., Plant Path- 
ologist. 

Liang, Lai Kuei, Assistant Forester 
for Republic of China, Pekin, 
China. 
fMiller, Danforth P., K 2, 149 
Broadway, ' New York City, 
Manager Sales Department, 
American Nursery Company. 

fPaige, George, Q. T. V., Address 
unknown. 

Parker, John R., K 2, Box 301, 

Bozeman, Mont., Assistant 
Entomologist, Montana Agri- 
cultural Experiment Station. 

Philbrick, Edwin D., * 2 K, 171 
Kirby Ave. Business address, 
City Hall, Detroit, Mich., City 
Forester. 

Reed, Horace B., K 2, Greenwich, 
Conn., Farm Foreman. 

Regan, William S., K 2, 136 State 
House, Boston, Mass., Assistant 
State Nursery Inspector. 

Sawyer, William F., Q. T. V., 
Sterling Junction, Mass., Arch- 
itectural Draughtsman. 

Shattuck, Leroy A., C. S. C, 
Pepperell, Mass., Farmer. 

Thurston, Frank E., $ 2 K, Trini- 
dad, Cuba, Superintendent for 
Trinidad Sugar Co. 



48 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



1908 

Turner, Miss Olive M., $ K $, 
22 Spaulding St., Amherst, 
Mass. 

Turner, William F., $ K <t>, Q. T. 
V., Auburn, Ala., Assistant 
Entomologist Alabama Experi- 
ment Station. 

Verbeck, Roland H., $ 2 K, Kezar 
Falls, Me., Principal Parsonsfield 
Seminary. 

Warner, Theoren L., $ K *, Q. T. 
V., U. S. Coast and Geodetic 
Survey, Washington, D. C. 

fWaugh, Thomas F., 0. T. V., 
7 Grant Court, Worcester, 
Mass., Teacher. 

Wellington, Joseph W., Q. T. V., 
Trapelo Road, Waltham, Mass., 
Farmer. 

Wheeler, Herman T., Q. T. V., 
R. F. D. No. 1, Lexington, 
Mass., Farmer. 

Whiting, Albert L., Q. T. V., 
908 West Illinois St., Urbana, 
111. M. Sc, R. I. State College of 
Agriculture and Mechanic Arts. 
1910, Ph. D., University of 
Illinois; 1912, Instructor and 
Research Assistant in Agron- 
omy, University of Illinois. 

fWhitmarsh, Raymond D., K 2, 
Wooster, Ohio, Assistant Ento- 
mologist, Ohio Agricultural 
Experiment Station. M. Sc, 
Massachusetts Agricultural Col- 
lege, 1911. 

Wright, Samuel J., Q. T. V., 
Amherst, Mass., Farmer. 



NON-GRADUATES 

Allen, Herbert C, East North- 
field, Mass. 

Austin, Frank L., 4320 Guilford 
Ave., Indianapolis, Ind. 



1908 



Bartlett, Louis W., 87 Cochrane 
St., Chicopee Falls, Mass., Ac- 
countant. 

Bennett, Ernest V., Maiden, Mass. 

Blake, Rodman R., East Pepperell, 
Mass., Machinist. 

Blakeley, Franklin C, 129| State 
St., Newburyport, Mass. 

Browne, Marcus M., Marlboro, 
Mass., Farmer. 

Caldwell, John S., 141 Milk St., 
Boston, Mass., Insurance. 

Carter, Henry R., 919 Main St., 
Worcester, Mass., Farmer. 

Cox, Leon C, 204 Huntington 
Ave., Boston, Mass. 

Damon, Henry F., Belchertown, 

Mass. 

Draper, James E., Bloomingdale, 
Worcester, Mass., Nurseryman. 

Edmands, Ernest C, 379 Lincoln 
Ave., Cliftondale, Mass. 

Fullam, Charles F., North Brook- 
field, Mass. 

Gold, Frank L., Torrington, Conn., 
Teacher. 

Goodwin, Chester L., Brockton, 
Mass., (73 Laureston St.) 

Hamburger, Amos F., Hyde Park, 

Mass. 

Lacouture, George L., Millbury» 
Mass., Grocer. 

Negus, Philip H., Fall River, 
Mass. 

fPagliery, Jose Cicilio,. Address 
unknown. 

Potter, John Sherman, Y. M. C. A., 
Milwaukee, Wis., Church Sex- 
retary. 

Wheeldon, Albert J., 137 Vernon 
St., Worcester, Mass. 



ADDRESS LIST 



49 



1909 

Orwell B. Briggs, Secretary. 

Alger, Paul E., C. S. C, Granby, 
Conn., Farmer. 

Barlow, Waldo D., <i> 2 K, Hel- 
ena, Mont., U. S. Forest Ser- 
vice. 

Barnes, Benjamin F., Jr., $, 
Holliston, Mass., Manager of 
Pine Crest Farm. 

Bartlett, Oscar C, C. S. C, 
Phoenix," Ariz., Assistant State 
Entomologist. Ph.D. Mass. 
Agric. College, 1912. 

Briggs, Orwell B., Q. T. V., 1015 

Fidelity Bldg., Baltimore, Md., 

Fertilizer Business. 
Brown, George M., Jr., $ K $, Q. 

T. V., Ill Duncan Bldg., 

Vancouver, B. C. 

CafLrey, Donald J., C. S. C, 
Connecticut Agricultural Exper- 
iment Station, New Haven, 
Conn., Entomologist. 

Cardin, Patricio P., Q. T. V., 
Agricultural Experiment Sta- 
tion, Santiago de las Vegas, 
Cuba. Chief of Department of 
Vegetable Pathology and Ento- 
mology. 
tChase, Edward L., 85 Vine St., 
Somerville, Mass., Civil Engin- 
eer. 

Codding, George M., $2K, Fourth 
Avenue Bldg., New York City, 
Forester. 

Corbett, Lambert S., Q. T. V., 
Lexington, Ky., Assistant in 
Animal Husbandry, Kentucky 
Agricultural ExperimentStation. 

Crosby, Harold P., C. S. C, 
Hyde Park, Vt., Teacher, super- 
intendent of Schools. 

Crossman, Samuel S., Q. T. V., 
San Juan, P. R. Entomologist. 

Curran, David A., care of Maxwell 
& MacKenzie, Vegeville, Al- 
berta, Canada, Civil Engineer. 
4 



1909 

Cutler, Homer, Auburn, Wash., 
Teacher, High School. 
t Fulton, Gordon R., C. S. C.» 
156 Beacon Hill Ave., Lynn, 
Mass., Salesman. 

fGeer, Myron F., <£, 32 Moore 
Ave., Springfield, Mass. 

tGeer, Wayne E., $, Weth- 
ersfield, Conn., Teacher. 

Hathaway, Elmer F., K 2, 97 
Huron Ave., Cambridge, Mass., 
with C. F. Hathaway & Son, 
Wholesale Bakers. 

Hsieh, En-Lung, <£ K <f>, Depart- 
ment of Agriculture and For- 
estry, Pekin, China. 

Hubbard, Arthur W., $ K $, Q. 
T. V., Sunderland, Mass. 
Farmer. 

Ide, Warren L., Gardner, Mass., 
State Colony Farm Superintend- 
ent. 

Ingalls, Dorsey F., Q. T. V., 
Berkshire, Mass., Farmer. 

Jen, Huang, Q. T. V., Director 
of Agricultural Experiment Sta- 
tion, Mukden, Manchuria, 
China. 

Knight, Harry O., C. S. C, 
Gardner, Mass., Farmer. 

tLindblad, Rockwood D., $ K $, 
K 2, 70 Phillips St., Albany, 
N. Y., Civil Engineer. 

MacGown, Guy E., Buckfield, 
Me., Tester for Dairy Associa- 
tion. 

Monahan, James V., C. S. C, 
1101 Tremont Bldg., Boston, 
Mass., with Warren H. Manning 
Landscape Gardener. 

Neale, Harold J., C. S. C, 2 
Sturgis St., Worcester, Mass., 
City Forester. 

Noble, Harold G., K 2, 2827 
Linden Court, Chicago, 111., 
Landscape Gardener, (Business 
address Marquette Bldg.) 



50 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



1909 

Noyes, John, Q. T. V., 1101 

Tremont Bldg., Boston, Mass., 

Landscape Gardener. 
O'Grady, James R., C. S. C, 

Littleton, N. H., Farmer. 
Oliver, Joseph T., Moravia, N. Y., 

Instructor in Agriculture, High 

School. 

Phelps, Harold D., <i> K 3>, West 
Brookfield, Mass., Farmer. 

Potter, Richard C, Q. T. V., 
Racine, Wis., Head of Depart- 
ment of Science, Racine College. 

Putnam, Charles S., $ K <£, <£», 
Walpole, N. H., Principal High 
School. 

Sexton, George F., Y. M. C. A. 

Bldg., Camden, N. J., Teacher. 

fShamiae G. M. Address un- 
known. 

Smulyan, Marcus T., Amherst, 
Mass., Graduate Student Mass- 
achusetts Agricultural College. 

Thompson, Myron W., $2K, 
Cody, Wyo., U. S. Forest 
Service. 

Thomson, Jared B., C. S. C, 
Monterey, Mass., Farm Mana- 
ger. 

Turner, Henry W., C. S. C, 
. Ensenada de Mora, Cuba, Sugar 
Planter. 

Warner, Fred C, Q. T. V., 
Sunderland, Mass., Civil Engin- 
eer, U. S. Geodetic and Coast 
Survey. 

Waters, Theodore C, C. S. C, 
Rocky Hill, Conn., Farmer. 

Webb, Charles R., C. S. C, 
Shrewsbury, Mass., Farmer and 
Forester. 

Whaley, James S., <S>K<I>, 65 N. Ar- 
lington Ave., East Orange, N.J. 
with Vacuum Oil Co. 

White, Charles H., North Ux- 
bridge, Mass., Farmer. 



1909 

White, Herbert L., 0. T. V., 

Maynard, Mass., First Clerk 

State Board of Agriculture, 

136 State House, Boston, Mass. 

Willis, Luther G., Q. T. V., 
Agricultural Experiment Station 
Knoxville, Tenn., Chemist. 

Wilson, Frank H., C. S. C, 
Nahant, Mass., Florist. 



NON-GRADUATES 

Adams, William E., Chelmsford, 

Mass., Dairyman. 
Bard well, Frank R., 18 Morgan 

St., Springfield, Mass. 

Bean, Thomas W., 208 Walnut St., 
Holyoke, Mass., Civil Engineer. 

Beebe, John Cleaveland, Thomp- 
son, Mont., Civil Engineer. 

Bent, George F., 673 Randolph 
Ave., Milton, Mass., Business. 

Brown, Eben H., Whitman St., 
R. F. D. 40B, Bridgewater, 
Mass., Farmer. 

Coleman, Leon N., Gardner, Mass. 

Cook, Walter A., Maple Farm, 
Tinley Park, 111., Farm Manager. 

Cox, Alfred Elmer, Jr., Bridge- 
water, Mass., Shoe Manufac- 
turer. 

Cronyn, Theodore R., Bernard- 
ston, Mass. 

Gates, Clarence A., 71 Florence 
St., Worcester, Mass. 

Handy, Leroy M., 15 Greenwood 
Ave., Worcester, Mass. 

*Hibbard, Myron J., Deceased. 
Hillman, Arthur J., Hardwick, 

Mass. 
Kennev, Walter J., Lowell, Mass., 
(99 Washington St.) 

Lambert, Marjorie W., Bard Ave., 
West Brighton Staten Island, 
N. Y., Teacher and Farmer. 

Learned, Wilfred H., 117 High 
St., Florence, Mass., Farmer. 



ADDRESS LIST 



51 



1910 

Lyman, Arthur D., Springfield, 
Mass., (129 Buckingham St.) 

Maps, Charles H., Long Branch, 
N. J., Lumber Dealer. 

Martin, Nelson L., Sharon, Mass. 

O'Donnell, John F., 17 Millbury 
St., Worcester, Mass. 

Paddock, Charles H., 1234 So 
Clarkson St., Denver, Colo.* 
Contractor. 

Parsons, Egbert R., Lenox, Mass. 

Pearce, Ernest E., Woodland Ter- 
race, Worcester, Mass. 

Randolph, Lucy A., Box 23, 
Dwight, Mass., Teacher. 

Richardson, George T., Jr., Mid- 
dleboro, Mass. 

Smith, Alexander H., Nyack, N. Y. 

Stewart, Eri S., R. F. D., No. 3, 
Athol, Mass., Farmer. 

Strong, Anson, Colchester, Conn 

Sweet, Charles R., Worcester, 
Mass. 

Trainor, Owen F., 19 Bradley St., 

Worcester, Mass. 
Treat, Carlton Eddy, Fitzwilliam 

Depot, N. H., Farmer. 
Tucker, Horace N., Waterbury, 

Conn. 

Turner, Leroy H., P. & L. E. 
R. R., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Wadsworth, Ralph E., Northboro, 
Mass. 

Whelpley, Walter M. 105 Jones 
St., Savannah, Ga., Chemist, 
Southern Cotton Oil Co. 



1910 

Frank L. Thomas, Secretary. 

t Allen, Rodolphus H., K 2, 565 
June St., Fall River, Mass. 

Annis, Ross E., <t> 2 K, 60 State 
St., Boston, Mass., Superin- 
tendent Perry Construction Co. 



1910 

Armstrong, Robert P., <f> 2 K, 
Canton, N. Y., Professor of 
Horticulture, St. Lawrence Uni- 
versity. 

Bailey, Dexter E., $ K <£, 6 $, 
Brookings, S. Dak., Dairy 
Chemist S. Dak. Agr. Exp. Sta- 
tion. 

Bailey, Justus C, 6 $, Holly 

Springs, Miss. 
Beeman, Francis S., K 2, Box 253, 

Ware, Mass., Farmer' 

Blaney, Jonathan P., A 2 <£, 
237 Humphrey St., Swampscott, 
Mass., Business address, , 1101 
Tremont Bldg., Boston, Mass., 
Landscape Gardener. 

Brandt, Louis, K 2, 20 Marie Ave., 
Everett, Mass. 

Brooks, Henry A,$2K, 1915 
St. Paul St., Baltimore, Md., 
Draughtsman. 

Brooks, Sumner C, * K *, $ 2 K, 

65 Hammond St., Cambridge, 

Mass., Assistant and Graduate 

Student Department of Botany, 

Harvord University. 

Brown, Louis C, K 2, Bridge- 
water, Mass., Farmer. 

Burke, Edward J., C. S. C, 
Hadley, Mass., Instructor in 
Agriculture Hopkins Academy. 

Clarke, Walter R., K 2, Milton- 
on-Hudson, N.Y., Fruit Grower. 

Cloues, William A., Q. T. V., 
Wickliffe, Ohio, Foreman, Spring 
Grave Farm. 

Cowles, Henry T., $ K <S>, 9 <£, Rio 
Grande, P. R., Superintendent 
of Schools. 

Damon, Edward F., $ 2 K, Up- 
land, Cal., Manager and In- 
spector Upland Citrus Associa- 
tion. 

Dickinson, Lawrence S., $ 2 K, 
Amherst, Mass., Superintendent 
of Grounds, M. A. C. 



52 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



1910 

Eddy, Roger S., Q. T. V., 37 
Parkman St., Dorchester, Mass., 
with D. Eddy & Sons. 
fEverson, John N., 124 North 
Spring Ave., St. Louis, Mo., 
Chemist. 
Fiske, Raymond J., <£, Stone- 
ham, Mass. 
Folsom, Josiah C, <£, Billerica, 

Mass., Farmer. 
fFrancis, Henry R., Q. T. V. 
French, Horace W., $2K, East 
Charlemont, Mass., Farmer. 

Haynes, Frank T., $ K $, Q. T.V., 
Sturbridge, Mass., Farmer. 

Hay ward, Warren W., K I <£, 
Millbury, Mass., Farmer. 

Hazen, Myron S., KS, 51 Cham- 
bers St., New York City, 
Assistant Sales Manager, Agri- 
cultural Chemist, Coe-Mortimer 
Co. 

Holland, Arthur W., K S, Shrews- 
bury, Mass., Farmer. 

fHosmer, Charles I., C. S. C, 
Turners Falls, Mass., Civil 
Engineer. 

Johnson, William C, Q. T. V., 
51 Chambers St., New York City, 
with Coe-Mortimer Co. 

Leonard, William E., Soledad, 

Cuba, Sugar Chemist. 
McLaine, Leonard S., K 2, 

Amherst, Mass. 
Mendum, Samuel W., $ K <£, 3>, 

312 No. Mills St.,Madison,Wis., 

University of Wisconsin. 

Nickless, Fred P., 3\ Bureau 
of Agriculture, Philippine 
Islands. 

Oertel, Charles A., Woronoco, 
Mass., Farm Superintendent. 

Partridge, Frank H., $2 K, 
Kamehameha Schools, Honolulu, 
T. H., Assistant Agriculturalist. 

Paulsen, George W., K 2, West 
Brookfield, Mass., Principal 
High School. 



1910 

Schermerhorn, Lyman G., Q. T. V., 
Bozeman, Mont., Assistant 
Horticulturist, Montana Agri- 
cultural College and Experiment 
Station. 

Thomas, Frank L., Q. T. V., 
Amherst, Mass., Graduate Stu- 
dent, Massachusetts Agricultu- 
ral College. 

Turner, Edward H., Q. T. V., 
Randolph Center, Vt., Teacher. 

Urban, Otto V.T..K2, Box 567, 
Savannah, Ga., Chemist. 

Vinton, George N., Sturbridge, 
Mass., Farmer. 

Waldron, Ralph A., Q. T. V., 
State College, Pa., Instructor 
in Botany. 

Wallace, William N., Amherst, 
Mass., Orchardist. 



NON-GRADUATES 

Bartlett, Leslie C, South Hadley 
Falls, Mass. 

Bigelowe, Windsor H., Princeton, 
Mass. 

Burrell, Ralph P., South Wey- 
mouth, Mass., Clerk. 

Call, Almon Eugene, 20 Beacon 
Hill Ave., Lynn, Mass., Chemist. 

Cary, William E., Gansevoort, 
N. Y., Farmer. 

Chaffee, Alfred B. 

*Chase, George B., Deceased. 

Curtis, William E., 4 Fern St., 

Worcester, Mass. 
Drohan, Joseph C, Belchertown, 

Mass. 
Eldridge, Cecil V., Harwichport, 

Mass. 
Faelten, Willibald C, 71 Crawford 

St., Boston, Mass. 

Gould, Harold A., 58 Magazine 
St., Cambridge, Mass. 

Hastings, David B., New York 
Mills, N. Y. 



ADDRESS LIST 



53 



1911 

Hatch, William M., 241 Maple St., 
Springfield, Mass. 

Howe, Chester L. 

Huang, Chen-Hua, 86 Buckingham 
St., Cambridge, Mass. 

fKelley, Albert C. Address un- 
known. 

Kelly, Edward N., care of Lyman 
School, Westboro, Mass. 

Leonard, Leavitt E., Pittsford 
Mills, Vt., Farmer. 

Lightbody, Winfred C, South 
Framingham, Mass., Account- 
ant. 

Lipman, Isaac B., Woodbine, N. J. 

McFarlane, George E. 

Moore, Harold I., 154 Grove Ave., 
Leominster, Mass., Teacher. 

Newcomb, Raymond W., Manila, 
Philippine Islands. 

Orr, Lewis J., 9 Lewis St., Port- 
land, Me. 

Orr, Philip E., 9 Lewis St., Port- 
land, Me. 

Robb, Allen J., R. F. D., No. 2, 

Ludlow, Mass., Farmer. 
Rockefeller, Harlan V. 

Rockwood, Albert F., Milton, 

N. H., Civil Engineer. 
Smith, Halliday S. 
Smith, Stanley S., Athol, Mass. 

Stalker, William Alexander, Fram- 
ingham Center, Mass. 

Stockwell, Chellis W., Athol, 
Mass., Entomologist. 

Sullivan, Arthur J., Dalton, Mass. 

Taylor, Israel H., Leverett, Mass., 
Teacher. 

Woodward, Walter F., 794 Main 
St., Worcester, Mass., Clerk. 



1911 

Adams, James F., Q. T. V., 
University Club, State College, 
Pa., Instructor in Botany. 



1911 

Allen, Park W., $ S K, Westfield, 
Mass., Insurance and Real Es- 
tate. 

Baker, Herbert J., K 2, Amherst, 
Mass., Expert in Farm Manage- 
ment. 

Barrows, Raymond C, Q. T. V., 
Stafford Springs, Conn., Farmer. 

Bentley, Arnold G., Q. T. V., 
193 Fairmount Ave., Hyde 
Park, Mass., Purchasing Agent, 
Becker Milling Machinery Co. 

Blaney, Herbert W., C. S. C, 

237 Humphrey St., Swampscott, 
Mass., with Warren H. Manning, 
Landscape Designer, 1101 Tre- 
mont Bldg, Boston, Mass. 

Brown, Edgar M., G *, 333 Vine 
St., Hartford, Conn., City Park 
Department. 

Bursley, Allyn P., <*> K $, $, 
West Barnstable, Mass. 

Conant, Arthur T., Sunderland, 
Mass., Farmer. 

Damon, Charles M. C. S. C, 

Haydenville, Mass. 
Davis, E. Norton, $ K $, B K *, 

Hampden, Mass., Farmer. 

Davis, Irving W., K 2, Amherst, 
Mass., Graduate Student and 
Graduate Assistant in Bee- 
keeping, Massachusetts Agricul- 
tural College. 

Gilgore, Irwin C, Q. T. V., care 
of Lord & Webster Co., 248 
Commercial St., Boston, Mass., 
Salesman. 

Hill, N. Herbert, $ 2 K, 14 Park 
Place, Princeton, N.J., Farmer. 

Jenks, Albert R., BK$, Spring- 
field, Mass., with Hampden Co. 
Improvement Association. 

Johnson, Leonard M., K r <t>, 
Newtown, Conn., Principal of 
High School. 

Labouteley, Gaston E., K 2, 
Three Rivers, Mass., Orchard- 
ing. 



54 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



1911 

Larrabee, Edward A., Amherst, 
Mass., Assistant in Botany, 
Massachusetts Agricultural Ex- 
periment Station. 

Lull, Robert D., <l> 2 K, 162 Essex 
St., Beverly, Mass., Farm Man- 
ager. 

McGraw, Frank D., C. S. C, 
56 Tecumseh St., Fall River, 
Mass. 

McLaughlin, Frederick A., K 2, 
Amherst, Mass., Assistant in 
Botany, Massachusetts Agricul- 
tural College. 

Morse, Henry B., K2, Amherst, 
Mass., Graduate Student, 
Massachusetts Agricultural Col- 
lege. 

Nagai, Isaburo, Tokyo, Japan, 
Student. 

Nickerson, George P., $2K, 
Philippine Constabulary, Mani- 
lla, P. I. 

Nielsen, Gustaf A., C. S. C, 
35 Webster St., West Newton, 
Mass. 

Ostrolenk, Bernhard, Slayton, 
Minn., Teacher. 

Parsons, Samuel R., <£ K <£, Q.T. 
V., Amherst, Mass., Assistant 
in Mathematics and Military 
Science, Massachusetts Agricul- 
tural College. 

Patch, Roland H., 6 <£, Depart- 
ment of Agriculture, Cornell 
University, Assistant in Flor- 
iculture and Graduate Student. 

Pauly, Herman A., KT *, West 
Wrentham, Mass., Farmer. 

Pickard, Percy W., * K <J>,Q.T.V., 

43 Chatham St., Boston, Mass. 
with Bowker Fertilizer Com- 
pany. 

Piper, Ralph W., Q. T. V., South 
Acton, Mass., Fruit Grower. 

Prouty, Philip H. Q. T. V., 
Shrewsbury, Mass., Farmer. 



1911 

Racicot, Philias A., <J> 2 K, 51 
Chambers St., New York City 
with Coe-Mortimer Co., Manu- 
facturers of Fertilizers. 
*Robinson, Ralph C, died October 

23, 1912, at Boston, Mass. 
Sharpe, Arthur H., K 2, Ridge- 
ville, Ontario, Canada, Land- 
scape Architect. 

Smith, Clarence A., Q. T. V., 
State College, Pa., Assistant in 
Chemistry. 

Smith, Raymond G., Amherst, 
Mass., Graduate Assistant in 
Botany, Massachusetts Agricul- 
tural College. 

Stevenson, Lomas O., C. S. C, 

Amherst, Mass. 
Titus, Willard M. S., $2K, North 
Andover, Mass., Farm Mana- 
ger. 

Warren, Edward E., $ 2 K, Lei- 
cester, Mass., Farmer. 

Whitney, Raymond L., Q. T. V., 
Central Village, Conn., Farm 
Manager. 

Willard, Harold F., <t» 2 K, Mid- 
Pacific College, Honolulu, T. H., 
Teacher. 

Winn, Ervin L., Elizabeth, N. J., 
Superintendent Bowker Chem- 
ical Co. 



NON-GRADUATES 

Armstrong, Ralph Henry, 116 
Pleasant St., Holyoke, Mass., 
Forester. 

Bearse, Alvin Wellington, West 
Harwich, Mass. 

Becker, John, Jr., 18 Roxana St., 
Hyde Park, Mass. 

Bliss, William Henry, 177Chestnut 
St., New Britain, Conn., Sales- 
man. 

Brown, Irving Clarence, Dupont 
Powder Co., Emporium, Pa., 
Chemist. 



ADDRESS LIST 



55 



191*1 

Chadbourne, James Green, Bridg- 
ton, Maine. 

Coash, William Henry, 305 Lowell 
St., Lawrence, Mass. 

Coles, Chester Ernest, 28 Hodges 
St., Attleboro, Mass., Mechanic. 

Daniels, Lewis Ernest, 15 Park 
St., Cambridge, Mass., Civil 
Engineer. 

Davey, James Abram, Kent, Ohio. 

Denslow, Raymond Albert, 316 
Locust St., Beloit, Wis., Teacher. 

Dudley, John Edward, Jr., 9 
Franklin St., East Somerville, 

Mass. 

Drury, Harold B., Farmer. 
Fitzgerald, James Edward, Bonds- 
ville, Mass. 

Grey, George Herbert, 79 Jefferson 
Ave., Chelsea, Mass., Salesman. 

Gunn, Clarence Armstrong, South- 
ampton, Mass., Farmer. 

Hammond, Charles Philip, 7 Broad 
Street Place, Lynn, Mass., Civil 
Engineer. 

Harrington, Henry Lorenzo, 40 

Central St., Boston, Mass., 
Clerk. 

Hazen, Jacob, Georgetown, Mass. 

Hennessey, William Francis, 
25 Waldeck St., Dorchester, 

Mass. 

Henry, Willard Francis, Hopedale, 
Mass., Station Agent. 

Howard, Frederick William, Nor- 
wichtown, Conn., Farmer. 

Howe, Harold Hosmer, 111 Euclid 
Ave., Springfield, Mass., Civil 
Engineer. 

Hyatt, Herbert Francis, 10 Arling- 
ton St., Leominster, Mass. 

Lew, Gerard Nelson, 89 Mt. Hope 
St., Lowell, Mass. 

fLiang, Ying Chi. Address un- 
known. 

Loker, Walter Melvin, 193 Pond 
St., Natick, Mass. 



1911 

fMcGann, P. S. Address unknown. 

McNayr, Rupert Stanley, Winston 
Salem, N. C. 

Merrill, Charles Edward, 90 Curtis 
St., West Somerville, Mass. 

Merrill, George Bates, 1083 Wash- 
ington St., North Abington, 
Mass., Entomologist. 

Moody, Chester, 228 Webster 
Ave., Chelsea, Mass. 

fO'Connor, J. H. Address unknown. 

Phipps, William Raymond, East 
Holliston, Mass., Postmaster. 

Prouty, Frank Alvin, 129 13th St., 
Portland, Ore. 

Robb, Gordon Howard, 44 Walter 
St., Salem, Mass., Student Mass- 
achusetts Institute of Technol- 
ogy. 

Roberts, Charles Elliott, Amherst, 
Mass. 

f Robinson, Sturgis M. 

Rosenbaum, Joseph, Department 
of Plant Pathology, Ithaca, 
N. Y., Student. 

Schmitz, Frank Julius, Thomaston, 
Conn., Civil Engineer. 

Spencer, Howard, Belchertown, 
Mass., Farmer. 

Tilton, George Albert, Wells 
Depot, Me., Farmer. 

Wheeler, Ralph Elgin, 1461 Main 
St., Brockton, Mass. 

Whittaker, Elmer Carlin,Ravenna, 
Ohio. 

Williams, George Edmund, Bel- 
chertown, Mass. 

Wood, Alton Palmer, 8 Washington 
Place, Braintree, Mass., Chauff- 
eur. 

Young, Donnell Brooks, North 
Hanover, Mass., Teacher. 



56 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



1912 

Ackerman, Arthur J., Q. T. V., 
Amherst, Mass., Graduate Stu- 
dent Massachusetts Agricutural 
College. 

Baker, Horace M., K 2, 274 Main 
St., Springfield, Mass., Real Es- 
tate. 

Beals, Carlos L., B K $, Amherst, 
Mass.,Asst. Chemist, Massachu- 
setts Agr. Experiment Station. 

Beers, Rowland T., C. S. C, 
Cromwell, Conn., Florist. 

Bent, William R., K r <i>, Prince- 
ton, Mass., Principal of High 
School. 

Bodfish, Edward H., 1 101 Tremont 
Bldg., Boston, Mass., Landscape 
Gardener, with W. H. Manning. 

Boland, Eric N., * 2 K, 809 Broad- 
way, South Boston, Mass. 

Brett, Alden C, K2, North Abing- 
ton, Mass., Grain, Hay and 
Coal Business. 

Brown, Merle R., North Grafton, 
Mass., Farmer. 

Burnham, Arthur J. A S f» f 
53 Fairfield Ave., Holyoke, 
Mass. 

Burr, Frederick H., 6 X, Depart- 
ment of Agriculture, Rutgers 
College, New Brunswick, N. J. 

Carpenter, Jesse, Jr., K 2, Turner 
Hill Farm, Ipswich, Mass., Or- 
charding. 

Castle, Fred A., $ 2 K, Pitts- 
field, Mass. Landscape Gar- 
dener. 

Clapp, Raymond K., X, 
Mineral Valley Farm, West- 
hampton, Mass., Fruit Grower. 

Curran, Daniel J., KT$, Mexico, 
N. Y., Agricultural Instructor in 
High School. 

Deming, Winfred G., $ 2 K, 
Wethersfield, Conn., Farmer. 

Dodge, Albert W., 2 T A, South 
Hamilton, Mass., Landscape 
Forester. 



1912 

Fagerstrom, Leon E., Q. T. V., 
Shrewsbury, Mass., with Beck- 
enham & Miller, Landscape 
Artchitects, Broadway, N. Y. 

Fisherdick,WarrenF.,B K 4>, 108 
South Pleasant St., Amherst, 
Mass., Stock Clerk, General 
Maintenance Dept., Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College. 

Fitts, Frank O., 6 X, Kingston, 

R. I., Assistant Chemist, R. I. 

State College. 
Fitzgerald, John J., 645 Green 

Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y., General 

Chemical Co. 

Fowler, George S., Amherst, Mass., 
Graduate Assistant, Department 
of Chemistry, Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 

Gallagher, James A., North Wil- 
mington, Mass. 

Gaskill, Lewis W., C. S. C, 
Cromwell, Conn., Florist. 

Gelinas, Louis E., K r <f>, corner 
Fifth and Bellefield Ave., Pitts- 
burgh, Pa., with Louden Ma- 
chinery Co. 

Gibbs, Robert M., care of Munson- 
Whitaker Co., Tremont Bldg., 
Boston, Mass., Forester and 
Tree Surgeon. 

Gibson, Lester E., K 2, 35 Win- 
throp St., Melrose, Mass. 

Gray, Frank L., K r <f>, Box 

18, Kingston, Mass., Florist. 

fHall, Henry B. 

Hall, Horace W., 33 Broad St., 
Boston, Mass., Lumber Business. 

Hallowell, Ray N., K 2, 381 Cen 
tre St., Jamaica Plain, Mass., 
Engineer, Boston Park Depart- 
ment. 

Hamblin, Stephen F., 1101 
Tremont Bldg., Boston, Mass., 
with W. H. Manning, Landcsape 
Designer. 



ADDRESS LIST 



57 



1912 

Harlow, Joseph A., K S, Turners 
Falls, Mass., Clerk. 

Heald, Jay M., Q. T. V., 9 Frank- 
lin St., Watertown, Mass. 
Farmer. 

Hemenway, Thomas, *2K, West 
Palm Beach, Fla. Teacher. 

Hickey, Francis B. C. S. S., 
35 Belmont St., Brockton, Mass. 

Hills, Frank B., Q. T. V., Bernard- 

ston, Mass. 
Holland, Henry L., Kr<i>, Reading, 

Pa., Chemist, Reading Bone 

Fertilizer Co. 

Hubert, Benjamin F., Orangeburg, 
S. C., Director, Agricultural 
Department of State College. 

Kingsbury, Arthur F., $K$,eX, 63 
Pine St., Middletown, Conn., 
with Rogers & Hubbard Co., 
Fertilizer Business. 

Lamson, Robert W., College Park, 
Md., Assistant in Chemistry and 
Bacteriology, Maryland Agri- 
cultural Experiment Station. 

Lin, Dau Yang, $ K <£, Yale Sta- 
tion, New Haven, Conn. Student 
in Forestry. 

Lodge, Charles A., C. S. C, 731 
Leavenworth St., Manhattan, 
Kans., Assistant in Botany, 
Kansas State Agricultural Col- 
lege. 

Madison, Francis S., Q. T. V., 
East Greenwich, R. I., Farmer. 

Martin, James F., AS*, 
Amherst, Mass., Graduate As- 
sistant in Entomology, Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural College. 

McGarr, Thomas A., K r <S>, 19 

Portland St., Worcester, Mass. 

Merkle, George E., Kingston, R. I., 
Assistant Chemist and Agrono- 
mist, Rhode Island Experiment 
Station. 

Merrill, Fred S., C. S. C, Man- 
hattan, Kan., Assistant Ento- 
mologist. 



1912 

Moreau, Theodore J. Q. T. V., 
Marquette Bldg., Chicago, 111., 
with American Park Builders, 
City Planning. 

Mueller, Alfred F., K r $, 703 
South Tryon St., Charlotte, 
N. C, Landscape Architect. 

Noyes, Harry A., B K <i>, Amherst, 
Mass., Graduate Assistant in 
Chemistry, Massachusetss Agri- 
cultural College. 

O'Flynn, George B., K r <J>, 33 

Hamilton St., Worcester, Mass., 
Student at Clark University. 

Parker, Ralph R.,$K$, A 2 <£, Am- 
herst, Mass., Graduate Student. 
Assistant in Zoology, M. A. C. 

Pearson, Charles C., $ S K, 149 
Whitney St., Hartford, Conn., 
Salesman, Commercial Paper. 

Peckham, Curtis, C. S. C, Wor- 
cester, N. Y., Teacher. 

Philbrick, William E., * 2 K, 815 
Stein way Hall, Chicago, 111., 
with Jens Jensen, Landscape 
Architect. 

Pierpont, John E., AS*, 
Williamsburg, Mass., Tree Ex- 
pert. 

Pratt, Marshall C, K S, 1767 
Middlesex St., Lowell, Mass. 

Puffer, Stephen P., A S <£, 
North Amherst, Mass. 

Raymond, Arthur N., S T A, R. 
F. D. 6, Norwich, Conn., with 
Torrington Building Co., Tor- 
rington, Conn. 

Reed, Robert E., X, 4008 
Prairie Ave., Chicago, 111., with 
Swift & Co. 

Robinson, Earle J., Q. T. V., 
Medford, Ore., Hill Crest Ranch. 

Rockwood, Lawrence P., 4> K $, 
Bureau of Entomology, Wash- 
ington, D. C, Entomological 
Assistant. 



58 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



1912 

Sanctuary, William C, X, Am- 
herst, Mass., Graduate Student 
Massachusetts Agricultural Col- 
lege. 

Sellew, Lewis R., 38 Worcester St., 
Natick, Mass. With Mass. 
Highway Commission. 

Shaw, Ezra I., K 2, Hangan, 
Mont., U. S. Forest Service. 

Southwick, Benjamin G.,3>K<£ 

Stack, Herbert J., Wallingford, 
Conn. Submaster, High School. 

Terry, Leon, 242 Dickinson St., 
Springfield, Mass. 

Torrey, Ray E.„ 4>K$, Grove City, 
Pa. Teacher of Biology in 
Grove City College. 

Tower, Daniel G., <t> 2 K, Am- 
herst, Mass. Graduate Student 
M. A. C. 

Tupper, George W., C. S. C,. 
60 Round Hill Street, Roxbury, 

Mass. 

Turner, Howard A.,$K$, Bureau 
of Plant Industry,- Salem, Ore. 

Wales, Robert W., K 2, Coe-Mor- 
timer Co., 51 Chambers St., New 
York City, Traveling Salesman. 

Warner, Roger A., 9 X, Sunder- 
land, Mass., Farmer. 

Weaver, William J., Highland, 
N. Y., Agricultural Teacher, 
High School. 

Whitney, Charles E., 13 Gold St., 
Wakefield, Mass. 

Wilbur, Emory S., B K <i>, Turner 
Hill Farm, Ipswich, Mass. 
Farmer. 

Wilde, Earle I., K 2, State Col- 
lege, Pa., Assistant in Land- 
scape Gardening. 

Williams, Edward R., Q. T. V., 
Concord Junction, Mass. 

Williams, Silas, O X, 74 Munroe 
St. Chicopee Falls, Mass., with 
Stevens Duryea Co. 



1912 

Wood, Howard H., $2K, Cod- 
man Farm, Dorchester, Mass., 
Farmer. 



NON-GRADUATES 

Baird, Everett Jameson, 1 Harvard 
St., Worcester, Mass., Business. 

Cabot, George D wight, Win- 
chester, Mass., Business. 

Caldwell, Lawrence Sanborn, 85 
North Common St., Lynn, Mass. 

Campbell, Clare Avery, North 
Eastham, Mass. Business. 

Clancy, Eugene Francis, South 
Hadley Falls, Mass., Salesman. 

Cohen, Harold, 103 Sycamore St., 
Somerville, Mass., Clerk. 

Deady, James E., 2 North East 
St., Amherst, Mass. 

Dee, J. Franics, 26 Aetna St., 

Worcester, Mass. 
Durling, Edgar Vincent, 347 Fifth 

Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Eastman, Edward Baxter, North 
Amherst, Mass. 

Ellsworth, Henry B., 356 Dwight 
St., Holyoke, Mass. 

Finnegan, John Thomas, 20 Tower 
St., Forest Hills, Mass. 

Folger, Ernest Maynard, 39 Wil- 
mington St., Montello, Mass., 
Civil Engineer. 

Frost, Newton John, 16 High St., 
Natick, Mass., Florist. 

Garelick, George, 280 Walnut St., 
Buffalo, N. Y. 

Goldberg, George, 28 Lynde St., 
Boston, Mass., Mechanic. 

Hall, Ralph Sawyer, Sturbridge, 

Mass. 

Hamilton, Percy, R. F. D. No. 4, 
Portland, Me. 

Heatley, David Buchanan, 371 
Hanover St., Fall River, Mass., 
Tester for Massachusetts Exper- 
iment Station. 



ADDRESS LIST 



59 



1912 

Hiltpold, Werner, 2 Clark St., 
Easthampton, Mass. 

Lloyd, Edward Russell, 48 Rutland 
St., Boston, Mass. 

McLean, John Robert, 7 Fountain 
St., Medford, Mass. 

Maxon, Donald Charles, 117 High 

St., Elkhart, Ind. 
Messer, Alan I., 51 Hull Ave., 

Pittsfield, Mass., Accountant. 
Norris, Edward J., 80 Tremont 

St., Winter Hill, Mass., Banking. 



1912 

Oppel, Eugene Irving, 589 Monroe 
St., Little Falls, N. Y. 

Smith, Harrison Edward, 52 
Edwards St., Medford, Mass. 

Springer, Isaac, 15 Cotting St., 
Boston, Mass., Student at 
Harvard University. 

"Tucker, John W., died in March, 
1911. 

Tong, Ying-Hee, Tientsin, China. 



ALPHABETICAL INDEX 



* denotes deceased. t Non-Graduate. 



t Abbott CD '06 

t Abercrombie F N 

'82. 

Ackerman A J '12 

t Adams E E '02 

t F E '74 

t G A '89 

JF '11 

RL '05 

t WE '09 

Adjemian A G '98 

Ahearn M F '04 

Alderman E H '94 

tAlexanderEP '74 

tAlger G W '89 

t I Jr '89 

P E '09 

Allen C F '08 

t E B '97 

t E W '94 

E W '85 

F S '82 

t F C '87 

t G D '82 

G H '05 

GH '71 

H F '97 

t H C '08 

J W '97 

t LB (Miss) '03 

t M J '78 

P W '11 

RH '10 

W E '03 

Alley H E '08 

Almeida A L '87 

L J '85 

fAmsden E C '07 

Anderson J A '08 

* K F '08 

tAndrae G C '75 

Annis RE '10 

Aplin G T '82 

fArimoto S '07 

*Armstrong A H '07 

H J '97 

t RH'll 

RP '10 

WH'99 

Arnold F L '91 

tAshton J '75 

Ateshian O H '86 

Atkins E K '00 

WH '86 

fAtwood H W '80 

fAustin F L '08 

t* J '94 

Averell F G '94 

fAvery D E '87 



t*Ayery F R '73 

tAyer W '88 

Ayres W '86 

tBabbitt E '94 

t G H '75 

Back E A '04 

Bacon L H '94 

t R A '06 

S C '03 

T S '94 

tBagg E O '95 

Bagley DA '76 

S C '83 

Bailey D E '10 

E W '08 

J C '10 

tBaird C H '07 

t EJ '12 

Baker D E '78 

t F.W '73 

H J '11 

H M '12 

H '00 

t J B '01 

J '93 

t Martin '79 

t PR '04 

fBaldus F '92 

t*Ball G T '02 

t* G K '77 

t W M '87 

Ballou H A '95 

tBancroft J F '72 

Bangs B W '08 

Barber G H '85 

S H '72 

tBarclay F W '97 

fBardin J E '92 

tBardwell F R '09 

tBarker C A Jr '72 

t J K '86 

L M '94 

Barlow W D '09 

Barnes B F Jr '09 

Barnes H L '05 

Barrett E W '87 

J F '75 

Barri J A '75 

tBarrows F K '73 

R C '11 

tBarrows W Jr '71 

Barrus G L '03 

t* S E '93 

Barry D '90 

J C '01 

J M '97 

T A '08 

tBarstow W H '74 

Bartholomew P 

Miss '08 



Bartlett E G '07 

F A '05 

F G '93 

JL '97 

t L C '10 

t L W '08 

O C '09 

fBarton C H '94 

fBass EL '79 

Bassett A L '71 

Bates C '08 

Baxter C N '98 

Beach C E '82 

Beals A T '92 

C L '12 

Beaman D A '99 

fBean T W '09 

fBearse AW '11 

tBecker John Jr '11 

fBeebe J C '09 

Beeman F S '10 

Beers R T '12 

fBelden A M '91 

E H '88 

JH '02 

t W L '05 

Bell B C '72 

t GH '71 

Bellamy J '76 

fBement J E '86 

Bemis W L '95 

Benedict J M '74 

fBennett E V '08 

Benson D H '77 

tBent G F '09 

WR '12 

Bentley A G '11 

t I W '94 

fBigelow W H '10 

Billings G A '95 

*Bingham E P '82 

tBirnie A C '97 

W P '71 

Bishop E A '83 

WH '82 

Blair J R '89 

fBlake E E '03 

M A '04 

t R R '08 

tBlakeley F C '08 

fBlanchard S P '94 

WH '74 

Blaney H W '11 

JP '10 

*Bliss C E '90 

H C '88 

t WH '11 

fBlood A H '72 

t*Blunt C E '71 



Boardman E L '94 

Bodfish EH '12 

H L '02 

Boland EN '12 

tBond R H '87 

fBoutelle A A '99- 

C A '01 

*Boutwell W L '78 

Bowen H C '0J 

Bowker W H '71 

fBowler P H *03 

Bowman C A '81 

*Boynton C E '81 

WI '92- 

Bragg E B '75 

fBrainard J W '72 

fBraman S N '90 

Brandt L '10' 

Braune D H '83 

tBreck W '71 

tBreen T R '87 

Brett AC '12 

t C E '05 

W F '72: 

Brewer C '77 

Bridgeforth GR'01 

tBriggs L W '74- 

O B '09 

Brigham A A '78 

t FW '05 

fBristol E F *80< 

*Brodt H S '82 

Brooks F K '88 

H A '10' 

t P C P '85 

P C '01 

P W *03 

S C '10 

t WC '81 

W P '75 

fBrown C H '82 

C L '94 

t C E '71 

t EH '09 

E M '11 

F H '00 

t F W '87 

G M '09 

t H C '84 

t H L '87 

t I C '11 

L C '10» 

Browne C W '85 

t MM '08 

t M H '95 

M R '12 

* W A '91 

W C '95 

fBruce E C '05 

fBrydon R P '06* 



€2 



ALPHABETICAL INDEX 



tBuffington C '85 

tBullard W E '72 

Bunker M '75 

Burgess A F '95 

Burke E J [10 

BurnhamAJ '12 

Burr F H '12 

tBurrill R P '10 

*Burrington H C'96 

Bursley A P '11 

fBush E '91 

tCabot G D '12 

Caffrey D J '09 

tCaldwell J S '08 

f LS '12 

W H '87 

tCall A E '10 

Callender T R '75 

1-Campbell C H *79 

t C A *12 

F G '75 

M A '00 

tCanto Y H '00 

Cardin P P '09 

Carey D H *06 

f WW '80 

fCarmody J F '03 

tCarneiro M D '78 

Carpenter C W '06 

D F '86 

F B '87 

J Jr '12 

MA '91 

TM '02 

Carr W F '81 

Carruth H S '75 

fCarter C M '05 

t H R '08 

■f H M '73 

Caruthers J T '07 

fCary WE '10 

t* W H '71 

tCasey M F '71 

T '01 

fCasparian G '82 

Castle FA '12 

-*Castro A de M '90 

Caswell LB '71 

Chace W F '07 

tChadbourneAH'86 

t JG'H 

tChadwick C H '07 

tChaffeeAB '10 

fChamberlain P A 

'92 

Chandler E P '74 

E S '82 

t W M '82 

tChapin C G '87 

H E '81 

t W L '02 

W E '99 

fChaplin J D H *83 

tChapman E B '72 

G H '07 

t J C '99 

J O '07 

L W '08 

t* W S '07 

tCharmbury TH'97 



tChase E T 


'75 


Cook L A 


'02 


E L 


'09 


f ME 


'97 


t* GB 


'10 


t R C 


"79 


t H K 


'82 


t W A 


'09 


H C 


'08 


Cooke T F 


'01 


W E 


'87 


Cooley F S 


'88 


t w J 


'02 


O F 


'02 


tCheever H M 


'03 


R A 


'95 


Cheney L L 


'97 


t* SR 


'78 


Chickering D 


'76 


Cooper J W 


'82 


JH 


'01 


fCopeland A B 


'86 


fChilds W F 


'73 


* AD 


'89 


tChipman F E 


'82 


t WW 


*04 


fChittendenEW'79 


fCopp B A 


'73 


*Choate E C . 


'78 


Corbett L S 


'09 


*Church F R 


'02 


Couden F D 


'04 


Claflin L C 


'02 


fCourtney H S 


'99 


fClancy E F 


'12 


t M 


'81 


Clapp C W 


'86 


fCowles E R 


'06 


FL 


'96 


F C 


'72 


RK 


'12 


H T 


'10 


Clark A 


'77 


HL 


'71 


C G 


'98 


tCowls W D 


'72 


E T 


'92 


fCox A E Jr 


'09 


t F S 


'87 


t LC 


'08 


t G C 


'01 


-fCrafts G E 


'82 


H E 


'95 


Craighead W H 


'06 


H D 


'93 


Crane H E 


'92 


t H L 


'82 


H L 


'00 


JW 


'72 


Crehore C W 


'95 


LF 


'97 


fCreidenberg J 


'12 


M H 


'07 


Crocker C S 


'89 


O L 


'08 


t L 


'71 


t W V 


'81 


fCronyn T R 


'09 


t WO 


'74 


Crosby H P 


'09 


WR 


'10 


H D 


'05 


t W A 


'74 


Crossman S S 


'09 


t wj 


'73 


tCrowell C A Jr 


'00 


* X Y 


'75 


f WR 


'00 


t*Clay C M 


'82 


fCummings J F 


'04 


* J W 


'75 


WA'08 


fCleland W F 


'73 


Curley G F 


'93 


fClementsonL T 


'07 


t WJ 


'96 


Cloues W A 


'10 


Curran D J 


'12 


tCoash W H 


'11 


DA 


'09 


Cobb G R 


'08 


fCurrier G F 


'82 


*Coburn C F 


'78 


Curtis A C 


'94 


t* OB 


'90 


t E W 


'01 


fCochran R A 


'82 


t JG 


'07 


Codding G M 


'09 


t WL 


'07 


tCohen H 


'12 


t WE 


'10 


fColby F W 


•97 


* W F 


'74 


tColcord W R 


'89 


CushmanMissE'05 


fCole D P 


'71 


t R H 


'87 


t WR 


'02 


fCutler G W 


'88 


fColeman L N 


'09 


H 


'09 


t R P 


'97 


Cutter A H 


'94 


WJ 


'08 


f* C S 


'85 


fColes C E 


'11 


FA 


'07 


fCollins J D 


'04 


J A 


'82 


tCollum G N 


'78 


* J c 


'72 


fColton W W 


*06 


Cutting R E 


'08 


fComins W H 


'82 


Dacy A L 


'02 


Conant A T 


'11 


Damon C M 


'11 


fCondit C de H 


'92 


E F 


'10 


fConger C T 


'83 


t H F 


'08 


fConnelly T H 


'06 


S C 


'82 


Cook A B 


'96 


tDana G H 


'01 


t J E 


*94 : 


H W 


'99 


JG 


*03 


Daniel J 


'08 



fDaniels F J '87 

t LE '11 

fDavenport A M'91 

S L '08 

fDavey J A '11 

fDavidson R P '92 

fDavis A W '95 

E N '11 

F W '89 

FA '87 

H C '93 

I W '11 

t J A '99 

P A '08 

P E '94 

Dawson W A '01 

fDay G '96 

t W L '85 

fDeadyJE '12 

tDearth G A '07 

fDee J F '12 

tDeland T J '75 

fDelano J J '82 

Dellea J M '02 

de Luce F E '96 

Deming W G '12 

tDenham E T '07 

fDenslow R A '11 

tDePew R M '76 

Deuel C F '76 

t F D '82 

JE '92 

DickermanWC '01 

* Dickinson A W '74 
t C C '99 

CM '95 
DW'90 
E H '88 
E T '94 
t HW'84 

t JF '85 

LS '10 
RS '79 
WE '07 

* WM'77 
fDillon J H '03 
fDix J Q '75 

Dodge AW '12 

G R '75 

t W B '96 

Dolan C '08 

fDole E J '88 

fDorman A R '01 
tDoubledayHM '74 
t WH '74 

fDoucet W H '86 
tDoyle J J '82 

fDraper J E '08 

Drew G A '97 

fDrohanJC '10 
fDrowne G L '94 
fDrury H B '11 
t R W '95 

fDuBois C M '91 
fDudley F S '07 
t JE '11 

fDuffield W C '94 
fDuncan G A '74 
RF '86 
fDurling E V *12 
fDutcher J R '99 



ALPHABETICAL INDEX 



63 



tDutton C K '82 


Fletcher S W 


'96 


Goldthwait J E '85 


Harlow F T '93 


fD wight E W '84 


W 


'92 


t WJJr 


H J '93 


Dwyer C E '02 


*Fiint C L 


'81 


'92 


J A '12 


f E F '95 


C L 


'08 


fGoodale R C '06 


*Harmon A A '00 


*Dyer EN '72 


E R 


'87 


D '82 


Harper W B '96 


Eames AG '91 


fFlower A D 


'73 


tGoodell J S '94 


tHarringtonFW'72 


*EasterbrookIH '72 


*Floyd C W 


'82 


tGoodenoughHH 05 


t HL'll 


fEastman E B '12 


Foley T P 


'95 


Goodrich C A '93 


tHarris F A '03 


t GH '71 


fFolger E M 


'12 


t W F '77 


t L L '82 


JF '07 


Folsom J C 


'10 


fGoodwin C L '08 


t R B '82 


P M '08 


Foote S D 


'78 


Gordon C E '01 


Hartford A A '07 


tEaton H N '92 


Foster F H 


'88 


tGorham F S '92 


Hart well B L '89 


J S '98 


t S C 


'06 


tGould H W '07 


tHarvey D P '93 


W A '86 


tFowle S O 


'92 


t H A '10 


L F '03 


fEddy J R '97 


Fowler A L 


'80 


Gowdey C C '08 


Harwood P M '75 


R S *10 


F H 


'87 


fGowdy H M '82 


*Hashiguchi B '81 


tEdmands E C '08 


GS 


'12 


Graham C S '92 


tHaskell E A '93 


Edwards F L '08 


H M 


'94 


fGraves E L '05 


S B '04 


H T '96 


* H J 


'94 


t G A '04 


Haskins H D '90 


Eldred F C '73 


t JH 


'86 


t GG '71 


Hastings A T Jr'06 


fEldridge C V '10 


Francis H R 


'10 


t L B '76 


t D B '10 


fEllis E S '76 


Franklin H J 


'03 


T '01 


fHatch G S . '75 


t G A '75 


French G T 


'06 


Gray F L '12 


W B '05 


Ellsworth E A '71 


H W 


'10 


fGreeley D S B '01 


t W M '10 


t F L '04 


t JL 


'74 


t*Green C D '93 


fHathawav B O '87 


t H B '12 


t VRMiss'07 


t H H '07 


E F '09 


Elwood C F '04 


fFrisbie G B 


'73 


t J E '96 


Hawkes E A '93 


Emerson H B '92 


Frost A F 


'00 


* S B '79 


*Hawley F W '71 


Emrich J A '97 


H L 


'95 


Greene F L '94 


J M '76 


fEndicott G '80 


t N J 


'12 


I C '94 


Hayes H K '08 


fEngstrom N '07 


t WL 


'90 


t WH 71 


Haynes FT '10 


t*Esip E T '04 


tFrothingh'mTG'75 


fGreenman F H '02 


fHayward A S '06 


Everson J N '10 


tFullam C F 


'08 


Gregg J W '04 


A I '88 




Fuller E A 


'90 


Gregory E '50 


t R L '96 


fFaelton W C '10 


G E 


'71 


t J H '93 


WW'10 


FagerstromLE '12 


Fulton E S 


'04 


tGrey G H '11 


fHazen J '11 


fFahey J J '04 


GR 


'09 


Griffin C H '04 


M S '10 


Fairbanks H S *95 


fFurness G A 


'73 


Grover R B '72 


Heald J M '12 


Fairfield F H '81 


Gallagher J A 


'12 


*Guild G W M '76 


fHealev G C '73 


fFalby F R '97 


Gamwell E S 


'01 


fGunn C B '71 


fHeatley D B '12 


fFaneuf A G '92 


Gardner J J 


'05 


t CA '11 


fHemenway F E '01 


Farley A J '08 


fGarelick G 


'12 


t W B '77 


HD'95 


fFarnsworth R L'97 


fGarrett W E 


'74 


tGurney V H '01 


T '12 


fFarrar A D '06 


Gaskill E F 


'06 


fHaffenrefferAF '05 


fHenderson E H '95 


t F A '92 


L W 


'12 


Hague H '75 


FH'93 


P W '08 


t MA 


'86 


tHaley G W '92 


fHennessey W F Jr 


*Felch P F '00 


fGates C A 


'09 


tHall AC '81 


'11 


Felt C F W '86 


V A 


'02 


t AS '80 


Henry J B '01 


E P '91 


Gay R P 


'05 


AW '05 


t WF '11 


Felton T P '90 


W W 


'91 


t FA '71 


Henshaw F F '04 


fFerren FA '06 


tGeary H G 


'96 


H B '12 


Herms C '84 


Field H J '91 


Geer M F 


'09 


H W '12 


Herrero J M '90 


JL '92 


W E 


'09 


I C '02 


*Herrick F S '71 


S H '88 


Gelinas L E 


'12 


J N '78 


fHersen E W '06 


Filer H B '06 


tGibbs C F 


'75 


t LW '71 


Hevia A A '83 


fFinklestein D E'07 


R M 


'12 


t RS '12 


*Hibbard J R '77 


fFinnegan J T '12 


Gibson L E 


'12 


t WJr '07 


t* M J '09 


tFish C S '82 


Gifford J E 


'94 


■j-Hallett C W '90 


Hickey F B '12 


Fisher J F '71 


Gilbert A W 


'04 


Halligan C P '03 


Higgins A W '07 


W S '98 


R D 


'00 


J E '00 


C H '94 


Fisherdick C W '87 


fGile A D 


'99 


Hallowell R N '12 


t N F '93 


WF'12 


Gilgore I C 


'11 


t*Hamblin J H '05 


t W E '03 


fFisk C A '74 


Gillett C S 


'08 


S F '12 


tHill C H '82 


R J '10 


t E 


'74 


tHamburger A F'08 


t L W B '04 


Fiske E R '72 


K E 


'08 


tHamilton P '12 


N H '11 


Fitts F O '12 


Gladwin F E 


'80 


Hammar J F '96 


tHillman A J '09 


fFittz A H '97 


tGoddard G A 


'90 


tHammond C P'll 


C D '82 


fFitzgerald J E '11 


Goessmann C I 


'97 


tHandy L M '09 


Hills F B '12 


J J *12 


t LE'94 


t R S '04 


J L '81 


Flagg C O '72 


fGold F L 


'08 


fHanlon H C '02 


fHiltpold W L '12 


fFletcher F H '83 


tGoldberg G 


'12 


tHanson S W '07 





64 



ALPHABETICAL INDEX 



Hinds W E '99 

tHinsdale R C '88 

Hitchcock D G '74 

fHoar T '92 

Hobbs J A '74 

t JF '81 

Hodgkiss H E '02 

tHogan F W '90 

Holcomb C S '05 

tHolder W S '02 

Holland AW *10 

E B '92 

H D '84 

H L '12 

tHolmes H H '75 

* L L '72 
t S J '82 

Holman S M '83 

t*Holt H D '98 

J E '88 

*Hood C E '06 

W L '03 

Hooker W A '99 

Horner L F '91 

Hosmer CI '10 

Howard E C '93 

t FW '11 

H M '91 

t J H '01 

t J C '79 

* J H '82 
S F '94 

fHowe C L '10 

Howe C S '78 

Clinton S'87 

t EG '72 

t EL '92 

E D '81 

G D '82 

t H H '11 

t H F '97 

W V '77 

WE '08 

t* W B '81 

Howell H '85 

fHowland C M '71 

Hoyt F S '93 

Hsieh En-lung '09 

fHuang C H '11 

Hubbard A W '09 

C M '92 

D L '89 

t F A '71 

G C '99 

t GA '95 

H F '78 

Hubert B F '12 

Z T '04 

Hull E T '00 

t H B '91 

J B '91 

tHumphrey GE '78 

-j-Hunt EH '79 

J F '78 

T F '05 

fHunter H C '97 

Hunting N J '01 

tHuntingtonRE '05 

t*Hurley ME '91 

tHuse F R '89 



Hutchings F F '08 

J T '89 

tHyatt H F '11 

Hvslop J A '08 

Id'e W L '09 

Ingalls D F '09 

Ingham N D '05 

tjackson A '82 

t H S '75 

R H '08 

tjames H F '02 

t H C '02 

tJefts M W '76 

Jen H '09 

Jenks A R '11 

Jennison H M '08 

tjohns F D 74 

fjohnson C F '94 

C.H '91 

t* F P '82 

F A '08 

t I H '88 

L M '11 

W C '10 

t Jones AC '74 

fjones A M '07 

* B K '96 
C H '90 

t C W '01 

t Cyrus W '01 

t E S '82 

E A '84 

F W '82 

G D '03 

t J H '94 

t L F '06 

t N N *82 

R S '95 

T H '08 

fjoyner F H '82 

tjudd C A '76 

t W H '01 

fjukdins AM '75 

fKalina J '07 

tKasmire G F '87 

fKeenan G F '99 

t*Keith E W '06 

T F '94 

fKelleher D W '71 

tKelley AC '10 

t EN '10 

t H T '03 

fKelliher J '04 

Kellogg J W '00 

t JH '93 

* W A '89 
Kelton J R '05 

*Kendall H '76 

fKenfield C R '82 

Kennedy F H '06 

tKenney W J '09 

Kimball F E '72 

tKingA '71 

t* C A '97 

C '07 

Kingman M B '82 

t WH'72 

Kingsbury A F '12 

tKinney A L '86 

A S '96 

B A '82 



Kinney C M '02 
L F '8S 
tKinsman E E '96 
t W F '75 

t W Q '93 

fKirbv D W '04 

Kirkland AH '94 

Knapp E E '88 
* W H '75 

Knight HO '09 
H L '02 
J B '92 
t J H '05 

fKnowlesWFJr'82 
tKnox H C '07 

t R '79 

Kramer AM '96 
fKrauss A A '82 

Kuroda S '95 

Labouteley G E'll 
fLacouture G L '08 

Ladd E T '05 

t J '05 

TH '76 

Lage O V B '91 
tLambert M W 
Miss '10 

Lamson G H Jr '03 
R W '12 

Landers M B '00 

Lane C B '95 

t W A '93 

fLang C J '86 

fLanigan W J '07 

Larrabee E A '11 

Lamed A J '08 

Larsen L D '08 
tLathrop J D '73 
fLawton C F '76 
fLeach F H '76 

Leamy P A '96 
t*Learned H B '94 
t W H '09 

*Leary L C '85 

Leavens G D '97 

Lee L K '75 

W G '80 

Lehnert E H '93 
♦Legate H N '91 
tLeighton C '07 

Leland W S '73 
t* WE '86 

fLeominster W '07 
•{Leonard A '82 

G '71 

t L E '10 

W E '10 

Leslie C T '01 

fLester F H '72 
tLew G N '11 

Lewis C W '05 
C I '02 

H W '95 
J F '00 

Liang L K '08 

t YC '11 

Libby E H '74 

tLightbody WC'10 

Lin DY '12 

fLincoln E A '07 

t J G '79 



Linblad R C '09 
fLindsay F B] '82 
fLindsey E '92 

JB '83 
fLipman IB '10 
fLivermore N L '82 
RW'72 

Livers S D (Miss) 

'07 

tLloyd E R '12 

fLockey J M '72 

Lodge C A '12 

tLoker W M '11 
tLong S H '87 

tLoomis F E '78 
t H R '88 

*Loring J S '90 

Lounsbury C P '94 

Lovell CO '78 
t F K '73 

fLublin AW '84 

Lull R D '11 

fLumbard J E '89 
fLuques E C '82 
fLuther G C '71 
tLyman A D '09 

* A H '73 
C E '78 

* H '74 
JF '05 
R P '92 

t R R '05 

R W '71 

t* W '74 

McCloud A C '90 

tMcCobb E F *02 

McConnelCW'76 

fMcDonald F J '92 

fMcGann PS '11 

McGarr T A '12 

McGraw F D '11 

fMcKenna J P '81 

McLaine L S '10 

McLaughlinFA'll 

fMcLean J R '12 

fMcNayr R S '11 

McQueen C M '80 

MacGown G E '09 

*Mackie G '72 

MackintoshRB '86 

Macleod W A '76 

Macomber E L '01 

Madison F S '12 

Magill C A '91 

fMahoney F W '06 

Manley L '94 

Mann G H '76 

fManton W J '82 

fMansfield G R '97 

tMaps C H '09 

fMarch A L '00 

t W M '85 

fMarkham J M '06 

fMarran B J '07 

Marsh J M '87 

J "95 

Marshall C L '87 

JL '96 



ALPHABETICAL INDEX 



65 



tMartin H T 


'03 


JE 


'06 


JF 


'12 


t J 


'87 


t N L 


'09 


W E 


'76 


tMarvin S B 


'94 


tMason A H 


'95 


tMattocks E E 


'80 


tMaxon D C 


'12 


May F G 


'82 


Maynard H E 


'99 


t JB 


'90 


S T 


'72 


tMayo W P 


'84 


fMeade W G 


82 


♦Meehan T F 


'87 


Melendy A E 


'93 


Mendum S W 


'10 


fMerchant C E 


'87 


Merkle G E 


'12 


tMerrill C E 


'11 


t CEJr 


'05 


FA 


'99 


FS 


'12 


t GB 


'11 


JC 


'75 


t N P 


*75 


JMerritt W H 


'87 


Merwin G H 


'94 


fMesser A I 


'12 


Miles A L 


'89 


G M 


'75 


fMillard D K 


'74 


t* F C 


'97 


Miller D P 


'08 


t HL 


'71 


t* ws 


'82 


Mills G W 


'73 


JK 


'77 


fMines W W 


'73 


Minor J B 


'73 


Minott C W 


'83 


Mishima Y 


'88 


t Mitchell W H 


'74 


Monahan A C 


'00 


JV 


'09 


N F 


'03 


Montague A H 


'74 


Montgomery A Jr 




'98 


f Moody C 


'11 


t GF 


'74 


fMoore F L 


'77 


t HI 


'10 


H W 


'96 


RB 


'88 


Moreau T J 


'12 


tMorey G 


'78 


H E 


"72 


Morrill A W 


'00 


tMorris F W 


'72 


Morse A J 


'94 


t E W 


'94 


H B 


'11 


* JH 


'71 


R W 


'02 


t SF 


'06 


t S L 


'96 


WL 


'95 


W A 


'82 



Moseley L H 


'06 


Mossman F W 


'90 


fMoulton H J 


'01 


Mudge E P 


'06 


Mueller A F 


'12 


fMunro D 


'93 


Munson M H 


'00 


W A 


'05 


Myrick H 


'82 


L 


'78 


Nagai I 


'11 


fNaito S 


'76 


tNash A H 


'72 


t ED 


'71 


+ x JA 


'85 


fNauss C S 


'92 


Neale H J 


'09 


tNegus P H 


'08 


Nersessian P IN 


'03 


fNewcomb R "W 


'10 


Newhall E W J 


r'05 


Newman G E 


'88 


Newton H D 


'04 


t*Nichols A Jr 


'85 


LA 


'71 


* RP 


'96 


Nickers on G P 


'11 


JP 


'98 


Nickless F P 


'10 


Nielsen G A 


'11 


fNims L 


'78 


Noble H G 


'09 


Norcross A D 


'71 


tNorris E J 


'12 


North M N 


'89 


Norton C A 


'97 


fNorwell A M 


'97 


Nourse A M 


'89 


D O 


'83 


t SJ 


'87 


Noyes F F 


'88 


HA 


'12 


J 


'09 


Nutting C A 


'96 


Nye G F 


'77 


fOber F A 


'72 


fO 'Connor J H 


'11 


Oertel C A 


'10 


fO'Donnell J F 


'09 


O'Flynn G B 


'12 


O' Grady J R 


'09 


O'Hearn G E 


'04 


fOkami Y 


'89 


Oliver J T 


'09 


fO 'Neil W J 


'05 


tOppel E I 


'12 


tOrr L J 


'10 


t PE 


'10 


Osgood F H 


'78 


Osmun A V 


'03 


Osterhout J C 


'87 


Ostrolenk B 


'11 


Otis H P 


'75 


t w C 


'00 


fOuld Remus 


'74 


Ovalle B J M 


'01 


tOwen H W 


'83 


tPaddock C H 


'09 


tPage H S 


'92 


* JB 


'71 



tPagliery J C '08 

Paige G R '08 

t H C '77 

J B '82 

W C '91 

tPaine AW '87 

Palmer C F '97 

t C B '79 

t E D '97 

t F W '77 

t HW '91 

t R M '86 

tPark F W '94 

tParker C H '93 

C M '07 

t E H '76 

t F G '75 

t F I '94 

G A '76 

G L '76 

* H F '77 
t J '95 
t J S '88 

J R '08 

R R '12 

S R '04 

W C '80 

Parmenter G F '00 

Parsons A '03 

t E R '09 

t H A '82 

t J W '03 

SR '11 

W A '88 

Partridge F H '10 

Patch G W '05 

RH '11 

tPaul A R '04 

HA .02 

Paulsen G '10 

Pauly H A '11 

tPeabody C H '75 

t H E '06 

* WR '72 
t WR '73 

Peakes R W '06 

tPearce E E '09 

t WS '74 

Pearson C C '12 

t G G '90 

fPease C T '80 

t J A '04 

Peck A L '04 

t* L E '05 

Peckham C '12 

Peebles W W '03 

t*Pember W S '93 
tPenhallow C L '72 

* DP '73 
Pentecost W L '96 

tPerkins C B '82 

D E '82 

t* EC '07 

t E L '03 

t* W H '76 

fPerry AD '81 

J R '93 

Peters A '81 

C A '97 

F C '07 



tPhelps A A '03 

C H '76 

C S '85 

H D *09 

* H L '74 

Philbrick E D '08 
W E '12 

t L '03 

tPhipps W R '11 

Pickard P W '11 

tPierce H T '07 

t H C '04 

Pierpont J E '12 

Pierson W R '01 

Pingree M H '99 

Piper R W '11 

tPixley MS '77 

tPlatt J C '82 

t WD '75 

tPlayer H H "75 

Plumb C S '82 

F H '92 
F Henry'02 

*Pomeroy R F '94 

tPond W H '91 

Poole E M '03 

E W '96 

I C '96 

t J '93 

tPorter C A '05. 

WH '76, 

Porto R '77 

Potter D C '95. 

t J S '08. 

R C '09- 

t R D '03 

WS '76 

Pratt M C '12 

tPray R P '07 

F C '06 

tPrenn J '06 

Preston C H '83 

t E G '76 

Proulx E G '03 

tProuty FA '11 

PH '11 

Puffer S P '12 

Putnam C S '09 

t G H '85 

t H A '82 

JH '94 

Quigley R A '04 
tRacicot A A Jr '06 

PA '11 

tRaitt J A '07 
fRandolph L (Miss) 
'09 

tRankin A B '71 

fRanlett C A '97 

tRanney W H '93 
fRansehousen L A 
'05 

Rawson E B '81 

t HW '96 

Raymond A N '12 

Ravmoth R R '04 

Read F H '96 

H B '95 



66 



ALPHABETICAL INDEX 



t*Redding M J '85 

t*Reed F S '75 

H B '08 

RE '12 

Regan W S '08 

*Renshaw J B '73 

fRhodes E E '05 

t WH '82 

fRice C A A '07 

C L '01 

FH '75 

T '88 

fRichardsonCH '04 

EF'87 

t G T Jr 

'09 

t H L '03 

t J C '05 

Richmond S H '71 

Rideout H N W'87 

Ripley G A '80 

fRisley C E '00 

tRobb A J '10 

t GH '11 

tRobbins D W '94 

fRoberts C E '11 

t P C '97 

♦Robertson R H '03 

Robinson E J '12 

t F D '95 

t G P '87 

t J A '76 

* R C '11 

t S M '11 

fRockefeller H V 

'10 

fRockwood A F ' 1 1 

LP '12 

Rogers E '92 

t H P '88 

t M T '76 

S S '06 

t W B '00 

Root J E '76 

LA '01 

W A '95 

Roper H H '96 

fRose N A '87 

fRosenbaum J '11 

-j-Rosenfeld M '12 

fRotch C L '75 

fRowland C W '73 

Rudolph C '79 

Ruggles- M '91 

fRussell E E '91 

t F N '90 

H M '06 

H L '90 

t H O '06 

W D '71 

fRyan A '04 

Saito S '96 

♦Salisbury F B '72 

Sanborn K '86 

Sanctuary WC '12 

fSanderson H T '91 

t RW'73 

WE '94 

fSanford G O '94 



fSanger F H 


'76 


Sastre S 


'96 


tSattler H C 


'81 


Saunders E B 


'02 


tSaville J R 


'92 


fSawin R D 


'04 


Sawyer A H 


'91 


WF 


'08 


t*Scannell M E 


'96 


Scott E H 


'06 


Schaffrath M 


'01 


Schermerhorn L G 




'10 


fSchmitz F J 


'11 


fSearle G W 


'07 


Sears J M 


'76 


W M 


'05 


fSedgwick B 


'92 


fSeldon J L 


'83 


Sellew L R 


'12 


M E 


'96 


R P 


'89 


Sexton G F 


'09 


Shamiae G M 


'09 


t*Shannon A H 


'06 


Sharpe A H 


'11 


t EH 


'00 


Shattuck L A 


'08 


fShaughnessyJJ 


'87 


fShaw C J 


'74 


t C L 


'07 


E H 


'07 


E D 


'72 


E I 


"12 


t F E 


'07 


F B 


'96 


Shepard L J 


'96 


Shepardson W M 




'88 


fSherman C F 


'97 


t H R 


'97 


W A 


'79 


Shimer B L 


'88 


Shiverick A F 


'82 


Shores H T 


'91 


Shultis N 


'96 


fShurtleff W D 


'96 


fShuttleworth E L 




'07 


*Simonds G B 


'90 


Simpson H B 


'73 


fSlade D R 


'76 


t*Slattery W Jr 


'71 


Sleeper G W 


'06 


Smead E B 


'71 


H P 


'94 


Smulyan M T 


'09 


tSmith A H 


'09 


A B 


'95 


t B S 


'81 


B H 


'99 


t C W 


'99 


C A 


'11 


Cotton A'93 


* F L 


'77 


* F S 


'74 


FA 


'93 


FJ 


'90 


* G E 


'94 


t G F 


'07 



Smith G P '79 

t HE '12 

t H K '82 

H F M '81 

t H S '10 

t J M *74 

t J R '89 

t J B '73 

t J L '81 

L '84 

L W '93 

P H '97 

R E '94 

RI '01 

R G '11 

t RE '05 

* R H '92 
S C '99 
S L '02 

t S S '10 

* T E '76 
t W A '04 
t* W S '86 
t W E '83 
t W H '84 
f W R '84 
t WP '88 

Snell E B '03 

Snow G H '72 

t L '75 

*Somers F M '72 

fSoule G W '93 
*Southmayd JE'77 
fSouthwick A L '71 
A A '75 

fSouthworthCH '77 

Spalding A W '81 

Sparrow LA '71 

Spaulding C H '94 

t C P '85 

t G E '85 

fSpencer H '11 

*Spofford A L '78 

fSpooner F A '76 

fSprague C E '05 

t W A '89 

fSpringer I '12 

fSpurr F Y '06 

Stack H J '12 

fStacy C E '99 

fStalker W A '10 

Stanley F G '00 

Staples H F '93 

P F '04 

fStarr E J '94 

tStearns H E '97 

t RS '75 

♦Stevens C L '95 

t F O '06 

Stevenson L O '11 

fStewart E S '09 

t W C '80 

fStillings L C '90 

StockbridgeFG '92 

HE'78 

tStockwell CW'10 

t H G '94 

tStoddard C S '07 

t S H '96 



Stone AH '80 

t F E '87 

G E '86 

G S '86 

t H F '92 

W E '82 

Stowe A N '90 

Strain B '06 

t W '74 

fStratton E N *90 

fStraw H D '05 

fStreeter A R '94 

Strickland G P'71 

fStrong A L '09 

Suhlke H A '06 

fSullivan A J '10 

M J '95 

t P F '06 

Summers J N '07 

Swain AN '05 

Swan R W '79 

fSwazey WW '72 

fSweet C R '09 

tSwift G A '71 

tSykes C S '05 

*Taft C A '76 

LR '82 

ML (Mrs) '05 

W E '90 

W O '06 

Tannatt W C '06 

Tashjian D B '01 

Taylor A D '05 

A H '82 

t E E '95 

F L '90 

F P '81 

G E '92 

t H M '78 

I N Jr "85 

t I H Jr '10 

t* R I '75 

Tekirian B O '85 

Terry L '12 

fThayer B '90 

Thomas F L '10 

t G H '72 

t J L '75 

"{Thompson C L '04 

CB '07 

EE'71 

t E F '94 

t H A'98 

t L I '03 

MW'09 

Thomson H M '92 

S C '72 

J B '09 

Thurston F E '08 

* W H '82 

Tilton G A '11 

tTinker C A '03 
Tinkham C S '03 

t H B '05 

Tinoco L A F '93 
Tirrell C A '06 
Titus W M S '11 
Tobey F C '95 
Todd J H '01 

Tolman W N '87 



ALPHABETICAL INDEX 



67 



Tompson H F 


'05 


Walker E J '93 


t*Wheeler C A 


'71 


fWilliams J S '95 


tTong Y H 


'12 


t H E '00 


t G W 


'86 


M H '92 


Toole S P 


'95 


t H C '12 


t* H L 


'82 


* P F '05 


Torelly F de S 


'87 


J H '07 


H T 


'08 


S '12 


Torrey R E 


'12 


L S '05 


HJ 


'83 


Wilson AC '01 


TottinghamWE'03 


Wallace W N '10 


t RE 


'11 


t A R '77 


Tower D G 


'12 


tWalsh T F '96 


W 


'71 


F H '09 


W V 


'03 


f Thomas F 


tWheelock V L 


'82 


Winchester J F '75 


fTowne F A 


'74 


'05 


fWhelpley W M 


'09 


Windsor J L '82 


fTownsley H M 


'80 


tWarden J K '02 


*Whitaker A 


'81 


tWing E R '80 


fTrainor F 


'09 


R D '98 


C L 


'05 


Winn E L '11 


tTreat C E 


'09 


Ware W C '71 


fWhitcomb A M 


'94 


tWinslow E D '86 


tTryon C 


'83 


♦Warner CD *81 


t NH 


'90 


tWitherell G A '04 


Tsuda G 


'96 


F C '09 


White C H 


'09 


tWitt H H '04 


tTucker C E 


'74 


R A '12 


E A 


'95 


tWolcott H R '98 


t F D 


'87 


SS '73 


E D 


'94 


tWolfe W M '81 


t F H 


'76 


TL '08 


t H K 


'88 


tWollheim E '03 


* G H 


*71 


t W E '80 


t H J 


'87 


Wood A H M '06 


t H N 


'09 


Warren E E '11 


H L 


'09 


t AP '11 


t* J w 


'12 


FL '95 


H M 


'04 


t A R *91 


Tuckerman F 


*78 


fWarriner A A '73 


t LA 


'89 


F W '73 


Tupper B 


'05 


fWashburn F P '96 


t vo 


'06 


t F W. '74 


G W 


'12 


JH'78 


Whiting A L 


'08 


H P '07 


Turner E H 


'10 


Waters T C '09 


Whitman N D 


'01 


H H '12 


FH 


'99 


Watkins F A '07 


WhitmarshRD 


'08 


t L '80 


H W 


'09 


Watson C H '87 


Whitney C A 


'89 


t WE '81 


HA 


'12 


Watts R J '07 


C E 


'12 


t*Woodbrey GB '93 


t LH 


'09 


Waugh T F '08 


* FL 


'71 


Woodbury H E '89 


OM(M 


iss) 


fWayesugi T K '77 


t JF 


'07 


t RA'95 




'08 


Weaver W J '12 


RL 


'11 


RP '78 


W F 


'08 


Webb C R '09 


W C 


'72 


tWoodhull G G '85 


■jTuttle H F 


'91 


J H '73 


*Whittaker A 


'81 


Woodman E E '74 


Tyng C 


'92 


t P '06 


t EC 


'11 


tWoodwardWF '10 


G M 


'92 


fWebster F W '03 


fWhittemore J S 


'85 


Woolson G C '71 


Urban V T 


'10 


fWeed P L '95 


Wholley F D 


'06 


tWorthington A F 


tUrner F G 


'77 


t WD '92 


Wilbur E S 


'12 


'88 


* G P 


'76 


tWeeks H F '75 


*Wilcox H H 


'81 


tWright E M '99 


tVaill W H 


'75 


Wellington C '73 


Wilde E I 


*12 


G H '98 


fVallentine F M 




JW'08 


Wilder J E 


'82 


S J '08 


Miss 


'96 


R '06 


Wiley S W 


'98 


Wyman J '77 


fVance P G 


'03 


tWells C O '89 


tWillard D 


'82 


tYamamura K '93 


fVaughan R H 


'96 


* H '72 


GB 


'92 


Yeaw F L *05 


Verbeck R H 


'08 


t L E '93 


H F 


'11 


tYouchi G '75 


Vinton G N 


'10 


fWentworthEF '89 


Willis G N 


'05 


Young C E '81 


tVolio E T 


'95 


fWentzell W B '95 


L G 


'09 


t D B '11 


tWadley G D 


'79 


West A M '00 


tWills J W 


*72 


E B '12 


fWadsworthRE 


'09 


D N '02 


fWilmarth F A 


'82 


tZabriskie F H '80 


tWaite H H 


'89 


t H L '97 


fWilliams A S 


'90 


tZeller B S '74 


Wakefield A T 


'73 


H C '92 


E R 


'12 


H M '74 


Waldron H E B 


'79 


* J S '90 


t F K 


'05 


t- W M '74 


R A 


'10 


M H '03 


F O 


'90 




Wales R W 


'12 


*Wetmore H G '76 


t G E 


'71 




tWalker A H 


'02 


Whaley J S '09 


t H 


'71 




C M 


'99 


tWheeldon A J '08 


JS 


'82 




C F 


'94 




* J E 


'76 





GEOGRAPHICAL INDEX 



ALABAMA 

Auburn 

Hinds WE 1899 

Turner W F 1908 

Montgomery 

*Boutelle C A 1901 

Tuskegee Institute 

LBridgeforth G R 

1901 

ARIZONA 
Phoenix 

Bartlett O C 1909 
Morrill A W 1900 

"ARKANSAS 

Lonoke 

Gates V A 1902 

Tie Plant 

Paul HA 1902 

CALIFORNIA 

Alhambra 

Joyner F H 1882 

Berkeley 

Green J E 1896 

Gregg J W 1904 

Hunt T F 1905 

Smith RE 1894 

Blythe 

Carey D H 1906 

Burbank 

Gladwin F E 1880 

Buttonwillow 

Adams R L 1905 

Coalinga 

Shaffrath M 1901 

Fair Oaks 

*RobinsonGP1887 

Highland 
Allen G H 1905 

Imperial 
Brooks P W 1903 

Los Angeles 

Libby E H 1874 

*Moulton H J 1901 

Smith C A 1893 

Whitman N D1901 

Napa Soda Springs 

*Jackson A 1882 

Modesto 
Greene F L 1894 

Oakland 

Rice F H 1875 

Pasadena 

*Smith W P 1888 



Pomona 

*Greene W H 1871 

Riverside 

Sanborn K 1886 

Sacramento 
Lee W G . 1880 

Salinas 
Gillett C S 1908 

San Francisco 
Bell B C 1872 

Elwood C F 1904 
Newhall E W Jr 

1905 
Taylor I N Jr 1885 
Wilson AC 1901 

San Gabriel 
Horner L F 1891 

San Jose 

Newman G E 1888 

Santa Barbara 

*DickinsonCC 1899 

Santa Monica 

Ingham N D 1905 

South Pasadena 

Palmer C F 1897 

Spreckels 
Alley HE 1908 

Upland 

Damon E F 1910 

*Palmer ED 1897 

Vacaville 

*Allen G D 1882 

Venice 

Tupper B 1905 

Watsonville 

Hillman CD 1882 

Whittier 
Rogers S S 1906 

COLORADO 

Colorado Springs 

*Gunn C B 1871 

Denver 

Cooley O F 1902 

Davis F A 1887 

Hall J N 1878 

*Paddock C H 1909 

Leadville 

Martin J E 1906 

Las Animas 

Barber G H 1885 

CONNECTICUT 
Branford 

Baxter C N 1898 



Bridgeport 

Barri J A 1875 

*Chittenden E W 

1879 

Burnside 
Atkins W H 1886 

Central Village 
Whitney R L 1911 

Chapinville 

Pentecost WL 1896 

Cheshire 

*WoodburyRA1895 

Colchester 

*Strong A 1909 

Collinsville 

*Williams F K 1905 

Cromwell 

Beers R T 1912 
Gaskill L W 1912 
Pierson W R 1901 

Derby 

Bodfish H L 1902 

Fairfield 

*Pease J A 1904 

Farmington 

Cook A B 1896 

Glastonbury 
Moseley L H 1906 
Williams J S 1882 

Granby 
Alger P E 1909 

Greenwich 
Drew G A 1897 
Reed H B 1908 

Groton 
*Copp B A 

Hartford 

Brown E M 

Goodrich C A 

Henry J B 
*Kellogg J H 

Parker G A 

Pearson C C 

Root J E 

Smead E B 
*White H J 



1873 

1911 

1893 
1901 
1893 
1876 
1912 
1876 
1871 
1887 

Leonard Bridge 
*Thomas G H 1872 

Litchfield 

Putnam J H 1894 
Middlebury 

Clark HE 1895 

Shepardson W M 
1888 
Middlefield 

Lyman C E 1878 



Middletown 

Kingsbury A F 

1912 

Moodus 
Hall W Jr 1907 

Mount Carmel 

*Strain W 1874 

New Britain 

*Bliss W H 1911 

Minor J B 1873 

New Canaan 
Jones E A . 1884 

New Haven 

Caffrey D J 1909 

Hayes H K 1908 

*Howe E L 1892 

*Hull H B 1891 

Lin D Y 1912 

Magill C A 1891 

Snell E B 1903 

Webb J H 1873 

*Webb P 1906 

Newtown 

Johnson L M 1911 

North Ashford 

*Wells L E 1893 

North Grosvenor- 

dale 

Baker J 1893 

Norwichtown 

*Howard F W 1911 

Old Saybrook 

HutchingsFF1908 

Rockport 

*Poole J 1893 

Rocky Hill 

Waters T C 1909 

Romford 
Harvey L F 1903 

Salisbury 

Phelps C S 1885 

So. Manchester 

*Farrar FA 1892 

South Norwalk 

Plumb F H 1902 

Southport 
Merwin G H 1894 

Stafford 

Plumb F H 1892 

Stafford Springs 

Barrows R C 1911 

Stamford 

Bartlett F A 1905 
Sears W M 1905 

Stonington 
*Haley G W 1892 



* Non Graduate. 



70 



GEOGRAPHICAL INDEX 



Storrs 

LamsonGHJr 1903 

Newton H D 1904 

Suffield 

*Goodale R C 1906 

Thomaston 
Schmitz F J 1911 

Thompson 

*Kirby D W 1904 

Torrington 

*Gold F L 1908 

Raymond AN 1912 

Wallingford 
Sellew ME 1896 
Stack H J 1912 

West Hartford 

Beach C E 1882 

West Haven 
*Nourse S J 1887 

Westport 
♦Tuttle H F 1891 
*Gorham F S 1892 

Wethersfield 
Geer WE 1909 
Deming W G 1912 

Willimantic 
Dawson W A 1901 

Windsor 

*Barber S H 1872 

Woodbury 

Benedict J M 1874 

DISTRICT OF 
COLUMBIA 
Washington 

Allen E W 1885 
*Babbitt EG 1894 
Bates C 1908 

Griffin C H 1904 
Hooker W A 1899 
Johnston F A 1908 
Knight H L 1902 
Monahan A C 1900 
*Morse E W 1894 
*Racicot A A 1906 
RockwoodLP 1912 
Russell H M 1906 
Simpson H B 1873 
Warner T L 1908 
West AM 1900 



FLORIDA 

Gainesville 
Flint E R 1887 

Jacksonville 
Benson D H 1877 

Miami 
Richmond SH 1871 

• Pierce 
Smith F J 1890 
West Palm Beach 
Hemenway T 1912 



GEORGIA 

Athens 
White ED 1894 

Atlanta 
Davis H C 1893 
Noyes F F 1888 
Stockbridge H E 

1878 
Augusta 
Cheney L L 1897 

Milledgeville 
Scott E H 1906 

Mt. Vernon 
Merrill FA 1899 

Savannah 

Urban O V T 1910 

*WhelpleyWM 1909 

IDAHO 
Caldwell 

Taylor AH 1882 

Rogerson 

Farrar P W 1908 



ILLINOIS 

Chicago 

ArmstrongHJ 
Bragg E B 
Brooks P C 
Cummings W 

DickinsonCM 
Field J L 
Howe E G 
Kinney C M 
Moreau T J 
Nichols L A 
Noble H G 
Nye G F 
PhilbrickWE 
Reed RE 
Shiverick A F 
Tirrell C A 
West M H 
Wilder J E 

Evanston 

*MansfieldGR 



1897 

1875 

1901 

A 

1908 

1895 

1892 

1872 

1902 

1912 

1871 

1909 

1877 

1912 

1912 

1882 

1906 

1903 

1882 

1897 



Highland Park 

*DavidsonRP 1892 

Jacksonville 

*AlexanderEP 1874 

Lake Forest 
*Brydon R P 1906 

Manteao 

Smith L W 1893 
* Wright EM 1899 

Tinley Park 

*Cook W A 1909 

Urbana 

Bailey E W 1908 

Gardner J J 1905 

Whiting A L 1908 

Waukegan 
*Hersem E W 1906 



INDIANA 

Elkhart 
*Maxon D C 1912 

Fort Wayne 
Smith A B 1895 

Indianapolis 

* Austin F L 1908 

Windsor J L 1882 

WoodburyHEl889 

La Fayette 
Potter W S 1876 
Proulx EG 1903 
Stone WE 1882 

North Judson 

Chandler E S 1882 

IOWA 

Oskaloosa 

Clark L F 1897 

Sioux City 

Allen C F 1908 

Storm Lake 

*EastmanGH 1871 

KANSAS 

Manhattan 

Ahearn M F 1904 

Lodge C A 1912 

Merrill F S 1912 

Topeka 

Felt C F W 1886 

KENTUCKY 

Lexington 
Corbett L S 1909 

Maysville 

*Cochran R A 1882 

LOUISIANA 

Baton Rouge 

Halligan J E 1900 

New Orleans 

DickinsonWE 1907 



MAINE 

Bangor 

*Crafts G E 1882 

Biddeford 

*Luques EC 1882 

Bridgeton 
*Chadbourne J G 
1911 

Buckfield 
MacGownGE 1909 

Backsport 

Edwards F L 1908 

Guilford 

*Straw H D 1905 

Kennebunk 

Rogers E 1892 

North Perry 

*WashburnFP 1896 



Kezar Falls 

Verbeck R H 1908 

Portland 
Chapin WE 1899 
*Hamilton P 1912 
*LightbodyWCl910 
*Orr L J 1910 

*Orr P E 1910 

Waterville 

ParmenterGF 1900 

Wells Depot 

*TiltonGA 1911 

Windsorville 

Dolan C 1908 

MARYLAND 

Baltimore 
Biiggs O B 1909 
Brooks HA 1910 
Pingree M H 1899 
*Willard D 1882 
College Park 
Lamson R W 1912 

Frederick 

♦Sharpe EH 1900 

Hagerstown 

Hyslop J A 1908 

*Zeller B S 1874 

Zeller H M 1874 

Roland Park 
Ladd E T 1905 

Ruxton 
Wiley S W 1898 

Silver Spring 
Billings G A 1895 

MASS'CHUSETTS 

Agawam 

Porter W H 1876 

Allston 

Sellew R P 1889 

Amherst 

AckermanAJ1912 

Baker H J 1911 

*Baker P R 1904 

*Brown M H 1895 

Beals C L 1912 

*Bement J E 1886 

Brooks W P 1875 

Carruth H S 1875 

ChapmanGH 1907 

Clark O G 1903 

Cook J G 1903 

Cowles H L 1871 

*Dana G H 1901 

Davis I W 1911 

*Deady J E 1912 

Deuel C F 1876 

*Deuet F D 1882 

' Deuel J E 1892 

*DickinsonJF 1885 

Dickinson LS 1910 

FisherdickWS 1912 

Fowler G S 1912 

Franklin H J 1903 

Gaskill E F 1906 



* Non Graduate. 



GEOGRAPHICAL INDEX 



71 



Gordon C E 
*Graves G G 

Hall A W Jr 
♦Harrington F 



♦Harris F A 

Haskell S B 

Haskins H D 
*Heatley D B 

Holland E B 

Holland H D 

Howard S F 

Jackson R H 

Kingman MB 

Larrabee E A 

Lindsey J B 
*Loomis F E 
*Martin H T 

Martin J F 

McCloud A C 

McLaine L S 

McLaughlin F 

Mills J K 

Morse H B 

Noyes H A 

Osmun A V 
♦Owen H 

Paige J B 

Parker R R 

Parsons S R 

Peters C A 

Regan W S 
*Roberts C E 

Root L A 

SanctuaryWG 

Shaw F B 

Smith P H 

Smith R G 
*Smith W H 

Smulyan M T 

StevensonLO 

Stone G E 

Thomas F L 

ThomsonHM 

Toole S P 

Tower D G 

Tuckerman F 

Turner O (Mi: 

Walker L S 
Wallace W N 
Watts R J 
Wellington C 
White E A 
Wright S J 

Andover 

*Abbott C D 1906 
*Clarke H L 1882 

Foster F H 

Holt J E 

Arlington 

Frost H L 1895 

Patch G W 1905 

*Robinson J A 1876 

Wyman J 1877 

Ashburnham 

♦Brigham F W 1905 



901 
871 
906 
W 
872 
903 
904 
890 
912 
892 
884 
894 
90S 
882 
911 
883 
878 
903 
912 
890 
910 
A 
911 
877 
911 
912 
903 
883 
882 
912 
911 
897 
908 
911 
901 
912 
896 
897 
911 
884 
909 
911 
887 
910 
892 
895 
912 
878 



908 

905 

910 

907 

873 

895 

908 



Ashby 

Hay ward A I 1888 
*Hubbard G H 1895 
*Jefts M W 1876 

Ashfield 

*March A L 1900 

Sears J M 1876 

Assinippi 
Jones F W 1882 

Athol 
Caswell LB 1871 
♦DruryR W 1895 
*Smith S S 1910 
♦Stewart E S 1909 
*StockwellCW 1910 

Attleboro 

♦Alger I Jr 1889 

Bliss H C 1888 

*Coles C E 1911 

Holman S M 1883 

Tompson H F 1905 

♦White V O 1905 

Ayer 
♦Markham J 1906 

* Walsh T F 1905 

Barnstable 
*Hallet C W 1890 

Barre 

♦Carter CM 1905 

Harwood P M 1875 

♦Smith G F . 1907 

♦Smith J L 1881 

Beachmont 
*Otis W C 1900 

Belchertown 
*Damon H F 1908 
*Dillon J 1903 

*DrohanDJC1910 
*Spencer H 1911 
♦Waite H H 1889 
West H C 1892 

* Williams GE 1911 
*Witt H H 1904 

Belmont 
Shaw E H 1907 

Berkshire 
Ingalls D F 1909 

Bernardston 

Hills F B 1912 

*Cronyn T R 1909 

*Cushman R H1887 

Beverly 

Lull R D 1911 

♦O'Neil W J 1905 

Stanley F G 1900 
*WentzellWB 1895 

Billerica 

Folsom J C 1910 

Hubbard D L 1889 

♦Ranlett C A 1897 

Blackstone 
♦SouthwickAL 1871 

Bondsville 
*Carmody J F 1903 
*FitzgeraldJEl911 



Boston 

Annis R E 
Averell F G 

*Bacon R A 
Barry J M 
Bodfish E H 
Boland E H 
Bowker W H 

*Brown F W 
Brown W C 
Caldwell S S 
CarpenterTM 

*Chipman F E 

* Connelly T H 
*Cox L C 

* Crocker L Jr 
♦Dwight E W 
♦Faelton W C 
♦Foster S C 

Gibbs R M 
Gilbert R D 
Gilgore I C 
*Goessmann L E 



♦Goldberg G 
GoldthwaitJE 

♦Goodrich W F 
Hamblin S F 
Hall H W 

♦Harrington H 



Holcomb C S 
Howard E C 
Hunt J F 
♦Jones N N 
♦Keenan G F 
♦Knowles W F J 

Livers S D (M 



♦Llovd E R 

Lovell C O 

MacleodWAAl 
♦MahoneyFW 

McConnelCWl 

Monahan J V 

Noyes J 

Osgood F H 

Parker W C 
♦Peabody C H 

Perry J R 

Pickard P W 
♦Porter C A 
♦Rawson H W 

Regan W S 

Shultis N 

Sleeper G W 
♦Springer I 
♦Stearns R S 

Taylor A D 

Taylor F L 
♦Taylor H M 

Tucker F H 
♦Walsh T F 

Watson C H 

Wheeler H J 

Wheeler W 

White H L 

Boxboro 
♦Richardson C H 

1904 



910 
894 
906 
897 
912 
912 
871 
887 
895 
908 
902 
882 
906 
908 
871 
884 
910 
906 
912 
900 
911 



894 
912 
885 
877 
912 
912 
L 

911 
905 
893 
878 
882 
899 



882 

ss) 

907 

912 

878 

876 

906 

876 

909 

909 

878 

880 

875 

893 

911 

905 

896 

908 

896 

906 

912 

875 

905 

890 

878 

876 

896 

887 

883 

871 

909 



Boylston 

Walker E J 1893 

Bradford 

♦Vance PC 1903 

Braintree 
♦Wood A P 1911 

Bridgewater 

♦Brown EH 1909 

Brown L C 1910 

♦Cox A E Jr 1909 

Brockton 

♦Baldus F G 1892 
♦Belden W L 1905 
♦CummingsJF 1904 
♦Goodwin C L 1908 

Hickey F B 1912 
♦Kelleher J 1904 

Kennedy F H 1906 
♦Peabody H E 1902 
♦Shaw F E 1907 

Brookfield 

Parker CM 1907 

Cambridge 

Blair J R 1889 

Brooks S C 1910 

♦Daniels L E 1911 

♦Day G 1896 

♦Gould HA 1910 

Hathaway EF 1909 

♦Huang C 1910 

Miles A L 1889 

♦Rogers W B 1900 

♦Weed PL 1895 

Canton 

♦Curtis E W 1901 
♦Stoddard C S 1907 
♦Wentworth E F 

1889 
Cataumet 
♦Handy R S 1904 

Chelmsford 

♦Adams WE 1909 

♦Holder W S 1902 

Fletcher W C 1892 

Osterhout J C 1887 

♦Park F W 1894 

Chelsea 

♦Grey G Hj 1911 

♦Moody C 1911 

Chester 

AldermanEH 1894 

Chicopee 

♦Chapin C G 1887 

Crehore C W 1895 

♦Dole E J 1888 

Chicopee Falls 

♦Babbitt G H 1875 

♦Bartlett L W 1908 

Williams S 1912 

Cliftondale 

♦Edmands E C 1908 

Concord 

♦Barker C A Jr 1872 

Concord Junction 

Leland W S 1873 
Williams E R 1912 



* Non Graduate. 



72 



GEOGRAPHICAL INDEX 



Cummington 
*Streeter A R 1894 

Dalton 

*Bardin J E 1892 

♦Sullivan A J 1910 

Danvers 

Marsh J 1895 

WoodmanEE 1874 

Dartmouth 
♦Sherman H R 1897 

Dedham 

Marshall C L 1887 

Deerfield 

♦Cole W R 1902 
♦Cowles E R 1906 
♦Randolph L A 1909 

Dorchester 
Averell F G 1894 
Brett W F 1872 
Eddy R S 1910 
♦HennesseyHL 1911 
Johnson C H 1891 
King C 1907 

Parker G L 1876 
Swain AN 1905 
Wood H H 1912 

Dover 

ChickeringJH 1901 

♦Colcord W R 1889 

Parsons A 1903 

Dracut 

♦RichardsonJCl905 

Dwight 
♦Randolph L A 1909 

East Charlemont 
French H W 1910 

East Dedham 

♦Worthington A F 
1888 

Easthampton 

♦Hiltpold W 1912 

Root W A 1895 

TannattWCJrl906 

East Foxboro 

♦Greeley D B S 1901 

East Holliston 
♦Phipps W R 1911 

East Northfield 
♦Allen H C 1908 

Eastondale 

Wood A H M 1906 

East Pepperell 

♦Blake R R 1908 

East Somerville 
♦Dudley J EJr 1911 

East Wareham 
Franklin H J 1903 

Enfield 
Chickering D 1876 

♦DuBois C M 1891 

Everett 

Brandt L« 1910 

♦Crowell W R 1900 



Fairhaven 
Potter DC 1895 

Fall River 
Allen R H 1910 
♦Haffenreffer A F 

1904 

♦Heatley D B 1912 

♦Lincoln E A 1907 

McGraw F D 1911 

♦Negus P H 1908 

Poole E W 1896 

Poole I C 1896 

Rice T 1888 

Fitchburg 
Casey T 1901 

Clark H D 1893 
♦Colton WW 1906 
Fisher J F 1871 
Keith T F 1894 

Florence 
♦Learned W H 1909 

Otis H P 1875 

♦VallentineFM1896 

Warner S S 1873 

Framingham 
♦Curley W J 1896 
♦Rogers HP 1888 
♦Stalker W A 1910 

Gardner 

♦Amsden E C 1907 

♦Coleman L N 1909 

Ide W L 1909 

Knight HO 1909 

Georgetown 
♦Hazen J 1911 

Gill 
♦Blake E E 1903 

Gloucester 

♦Eaton H N 1892 

♦Nauss C S 1892 

Granby 

Davis P E 1894 

Great Barrington 

Dellea J M 1902 

Hull J B Jr 1891 

♦Marran B J 1907 

♦Parker J S 1888 

Turner F H 1899 

Greendale 
Ripley G A 1880 

Greenfield 

Carpenter MA 1891 

Clapp C W 1886 

Field H J 1891 

♦Flower A 1873 

♦Hinsdale R C 1888 

♦Miller H L 1871 

Smead H P 1894 

♦ZabriskieFH 1880 

Groton 

May F G 1882 

Hadley 

Burke E J 1910 

♦Comins W H 1882 

Montgomery A W 

1898 



Halifax 

♦Denham E T 1907 

Hamilton 

Ware W C 1871 

Hampden 
Davis EN 1911 

Hanson 
Barker L M 1894 

Hardwick 

Flagg C O 1872 

♦Hillman A J 1909 

Parker S R 1904 

Hartsville 

♦Bentley I W 1894 

Harvard 

♦BlanchardSP 1894 
Peters A 1881 

Harwichport 
♦Eldridge C V 1910 

Hatfield 

♦Graves EL 1905 

Graves T Jr 1901 

♦Wells CO 1889 

Hathorne 

Preston C H 1883 

Haverhill 

Brooks F K 1888 
♦GreenmanFHl902 

Haydenville 
Damon CM 1911 

Heath 
♦Kinsman E E 1896 

Holden 

Graham C S 1892 

Holliston 
Barnes B F Jr 1909 
Smith S E 1899 

Holyoke 

♦ArmstrongRHl911 

♦Baird C H 1906 

Bartlett F G 1893 

♦Bean T W 1909 

Burnham A J 1912 

Ellsworth E A 1871 

♦Ellsworth F L 1904 

♦EllsworthHB 1912 

♦Hill C H 1882 

♦Kenfield C R 1882 

♦SandersonRWl873 

Hopedale 

♦Clarke F S 1887 

♦Henry W F 1911 

Hudson 

Minott C W 1883 

Stowe AN 1890 

Huntington 

♦Jones C W 1901 

Kirkland A H 1894 

Munson M H 1900 

Hyde Park 

♦Becker J Jr 1911 

Bentley AG 1911 

♦Hamburger A F 

1903 
WaldronHEB 1879 



Ipswich 

CarpenterJJr 
♦Kinsman W F 
♦Kinsman W Q 
Roper H H 
Smith F A 
Tashjian D B 
Wilbur E S 



1912 
1875 
1898 
1896 
1893 
1901 
1912 



Jamaica Plain 

♦Dodge W B 1896 

HallowellRN 1912 

Kingston 
Gray F L 1912 

Lawrence 

♦Ayer W 1888 

♦Coash W H 1911 
Cutter AH 1894 
♦Fuller E A 1890 
♦Shuttleworth E L 
1907 
WinchesterJF 1875 
Leicester 
♦SandersonHT 1891 
Warren E E 1911 
♦Whittemore J S 

1885 
Lenox 
♦Parsons E R 1909 

Leominster 

Greene I C 1894 

♦Hyatt H F 1911 

♦Lockey J M 1872 

♦Moore H I 1910 

Snow G H 1872 

Leverett 

♦Taylor I H 1910 

Lexington 

SpauldingCHl894 
Wheeler H T 1908 

Lithia 
Barrus G L 1903 

Littleton 

♦Johnson C F 1894 

Munson W A 1905 

♦WhitcombNHl890 

Lowell 

Davis P A 1908 

Kinney B A 1882 

♦Leighton C 1907 

♦Lew G N 1911 

♦Morey G 1878 

Pratt M C 1912 

Sherman W A 1879 

Ludlow 

♦Birnie A C 
♦Jones A M 
♦Robb A J 

Lynn 
♦Caldwell L S 
♦Call A E 
♦Chase W J 
♦Dwyer E F 

Fulton G R 
♦HammondCP 

Marsh J M 



1897 
1907 
1910 

1912 
1910 
1902 
1895 
1909 
1911 
1887 



* Non Graduate. 



GEOGRAPHICAL INDEX 



73 



Lyonsville 
Lamed A J 1908 

Maiden 

Bennett E V 1908 

♦Clark W V 1881 

*Clarke G C 1901 

Morey H E 1872 

Marblehead 

*Goldthwait W J Jr 

1892 

Gregory E 1890 

*Martin J 1887 

♦Weed WD 1892 

Marlboro 

Brown F H 1900 

♦Browne M M 1908 

Goodale D 1882 

Howe E D 1881 

Howe W L 1908 

♦Shaughnessy J J 

1887 
♦Stratton E N 1890 

Marshfield 
Harlow F T 1893 

Medfield 

♦Mason A H 1895 

Medford 

Barrett E W 
♦Barstow W H 
♦McLean J R 

Mills G W 

Perkins D E 
♦Smith H E 
♦Stillings L C 

Melrose 

Fisher W S 

Gibson L E 

♦Smith C W 



1887 
1874 
1912 
1873 
1882 
1912 
1890 

1898 
1912 
1899 

Melrose Highlands 

Bagley S C 1883 
Burgess A F 1895 
Lewis C W 1905 
Morse W A 1882 
♦Spurr FY 1906 
Summers J N 1907 

Methuen 

Emerson H B 1892 

Middleboro 

♦Richardson G F Jr. 

1909 

♦Shaw C L 1907 

♦Williams J S 1895 

Middlefield 

Lyman C E 1878 

Middleton 

♦Knight J H 1905 

Milford 

Curley G F 1893 
♦Farrar AD 1906 
♦McCobb E F 1902 

Millbrook 
♦Walker AH 1902 

Millis 

♦Adams E E 1902 

Cook L A 1902 

RichardsonEFl887 



Millbury 

Gifford J E 1894 
♦Gould H W 1907 

Hay ward WW 1910 
♦Lacouture G L1908 
♦Pierce H T 1907 
♦Pierce H C 1904 

Milton 
♦Bent G F 1909 

Ruggles M 1891 

Monson 
CarpenterCW 1906 
Norcross AD 1871 

Montague 
♦Lyman R R 1905 

Montello 
♦Folger EM 1912 

Monterey 
Thomson J B 1909 

Nahant 
Wilson F H Jr 1909 

Natick 

Annis RE 1910 

♦Cleland W F 1873 

♦Frost N J 1912 

♦LokerWM 1911 

♦Pray R P 1907 

Sellew L R 1912 

Needham 

♦Bond R H 1887 
♦Fowle SO 1892 

New Bedford 

Allen G H 1871 

♦Dorman A R 1901 

♦Lawton C F 1876 

♦Leominster W 1907 

Poole E W 1896 

Newburyport 

♦Blakeley F C 1908 

Howe W V 1877 

♦Johnson I H 1888 

Newton 

Bunker M 1875 
Clark A . 1877 

Newtonville 
Baker D E 1878 
Barry D 1890 

Peakes R W 1906 
North Abington 
Brett A C 1912 
♦Merrill G B 1911 
Wales R W 1912 

North Amherst 

♦Cowls W D 1872 
DickinsonEH 1888 

♦Eastman E B 1912 
Fitts F O 1912 

Fulton E S 1904 
Jones G 1903 

♦Loomis H R 1888 

♦Parsons HA 1882 
Pray F C 1906 

Puffer S P 1912 



Northampton 

Atkins EK 1900 
♦Brown C E 1871 
♦Collins J D 1904 

DickinsonET 1894 
♦Graves G H 1904 

Hemenway H D 

1895 

Lehnert EH 1893 

Lyman R W 1871 
♦Maynard J B 1890 

Morse A J 1894 
♦Parsons J W 1903 

Shores H T 1891 

North Andover 
Chapman J O 1907 
Titus W M S 1911 

North Attleboro 
♦Pond W H 1891 
♦Rhodes E E 1905 

Northboro 

Allen J W 1897 

♦Falby F R 1897 

♦Morse S F 1906 

Maynard S T 1872 

Sparrow LA 1871 

♦Wadsworth R E 

1909 

North Brookfield 
♦Fullam C F 1908 

North Cambridge 
♦Howe H F 1897 

North Dartmouth 

Poole E M 1903 

North Eastham 

♦Campbell C A 1912 

North Easton 

♦Hanlon H C 1902 

Northfield 

CallenderTR1875 
♦Chamberlain P A 
1892 

North Grafton 
Brown M R 1912 
DavenportSL 1908 
Staples P F 1904 

North Hadley 

Clark J W 1872 

♦Russell HO 1906 

♦Ryan A 1904 

North Hanover 

♦Young D B 1911 

North Hatfield 

Field S H 1888 

North Scituate 
Wholly F D 1906 
North Uxbridge 
White C H 1909 
North Wilmington 
Eames AG 1891 
Gallagher J A 1912 

North Woburn 

Arnold F L 1891 

Norwood 
♦Fittz AH 1897 



Orange 

Smith H F M 1881 

Otter River 

Stone G S 1886 

Palmer 

♦Brainerd J W 1872 

Peabody 

♦Brown H L 1887 

♦Ferren FA 1906 

MacKintosh R B 

1886 

Pembroke 

♦Sawin R D 1904 

Pepperell 

Shattuck L A 1908 

Petersham 

♦Robinson F D 1895 

Pittsfield 

Castle FA 1912 
♦Coleman R P 1897 

Cooke T F 1901 
♦Fahey J J 1904 

Leslie C T 1901 
♦Messer A I 1912 

O'Hearn G E 1904 
Plymouth 

Cooper J W 1882 
♦ShurtleffWD1896 

Princeton 

Bent W R 1912 

♦Bigelow W H 1910 

Crosby H D 1905 

Quincy 
Crane HE 1892 

Quincy Point 

♦Duffield W C 1894 

Randolph 

♦Thayer B 1890 

Reading 

♦Pearson G C 1890 

Readville 

Mann G H 1876 

Revere 

♦Hall AS 1880 

Richmond 
♦Coleman R R 1897 

Rockland 
♦Lanigan W J 1907 
♦Stoddard SH 1896 

Rockport 

♦Lane W A 1893 

♦Saville J R 1892 

Roslindale 

Davis F W 1889 

Noyes J 1909 

Rowley 
Todd J H 1901 

Roxbury 
Belden E H 1888 
♦Colby F W 1897 
♦Hanson S W 1907 
MendumS W 1910 
Tinkham C S 1903 
Tupper G W 1912 



* Non Graduate. 



74 



GEOGRAPHICAL INDEX 



Russell 
*CopelandAB 1886 

Rutland 
♦Potter R D 1903 

Salem 

Dana H W 1899 

*MerrillCEJr 1905 

♦Robb G H 1911 

Salisbury 

Bartlett J L 1897 

Sandwich 

Eldred F C 1873 

Scituate 

*Curtis W L i907 

Sharon 
♦Martin N L 1909 

Sheffield 
BoardmanEL 1894 
WakefieldAT 1873 

Shelburne 
' Taylor G E 1892 

Sherborn 

♦Dearth G A 1907 

Shirley 
Clark E T 1892 
Fowler F H 1887 

Shrewsbury 
♦Cook ME 1897 
Fagerstrom L E 

1912 
Harlow H J 1893 
Holland A W 1910 
Prouty P H 1911 
Webb C R 1909 

Shutesbury 
Hunting N J 1901 

Somerville 

♦Bruce EC 1905 

Chase EI 1909 

♦Cohen H 1912 

Fowler H M 1894 

♦Goodrich WF 1877 

♦Jones LP 1905 

RideoutHNWl887 

South Acton 

Piper R W 1911 

Southboro 

♦Phelps A A 1903 

Southampton 
♦Gunn C A 1911 
♦Gunn W B 1877 

Parsons W A 1888 
South Framingham 
♦LightbodyWCl910 
♦Mayo W P 1884 

Monahan N F 1903 
South Hadley 

Kinney A S 1896 

MontagueAH 1874 
South Hadley Falls 
♦Bartlett L C 1910 
♦Clancy E F 1912 
♦Judd C A 1876 

♦Judd W H 1901 
♦Smith RE 1905 



South Hamilton 
Dodge A W 1912 
Dodge G R 1875 

South Peabody 
Sleeper G W 1906 

South Natick 
♦Hunter H C 1897 
♦ThompsonCL 1904 

South Sudbury 

Hall J C 1902 

South Weymouth 

♦Burrell R P 1910 

♦Reed F S 1875 

Southwick 

♦Gillett E 1874 

Gillett KE 1908 

Spencer 

Bacon L H 1894 

Bemis W L 1895 

♦Green H H 1907 

♦Starr E J 1894 

Springfield 

Bacon T S 1894 

Baker H M 1912 

♦Bardwell F R 1909 

♦Belden A M 1891 

Birnie W P 1871 

BoyntonWT 1892 

Brown C L 1894 

♦Cole DP 1871 

♦Davis J A 1899 

♦Faneuf AG 1892 

Geer M F 1909 

♦Hatch W M 1910 

Howe G D 1882 

♦Howe H H 1911 

Jenk? A R 1911 

Kramer A M 1896 

Leonard G 1871 

♦Lyman AD 1909 

♦Meade W G 1882 

♦Merritt W H 1887 

Myrick H 1882 

♦Pixley M S 1877 

♦Ransehousen L A 

1905 

Shaw E D 1872 

Smith B H 1899 

♦Smith W A 1904 

♦Swazey W W 1872 

Terry L 1912 

♦Webster F W 1903 

♦Wolcott H R 1898 

Sterling Junction 
Sawyer W F 1908 

Stockbridge 
Barnes H L 1905 

Stoneham 
Fiske R J 1910 

Stoughton 
♦Chapman J C 1899 

Sturbridge 

♦Hall R S 1912 

Haynes F T 1910 

Vinton G N 1910 



Sunderland 

Clark C G 1898 
Conant AT 1911 
Hubbard AW 1909 
Hubbard C M 1892 
Hubbard G C 1899 

♦Russell FN 1890 
Smith G P 1879 
Warner F C 1909 
Warner R A 1912 

♦Williams A S 1890 
Williams F O 1890 
Williams M H 1892 

Sutton 
Gifford J E 1894 
♦StockwellHG 1894 
Swampscott 
Blanev H W 1911 
Blaney J P 1910 
Chase H C 1903 
Mudge E P 1905 

Taunton 

♦King A 1871 

SouthwickAA 1875 

Three Rivers 
Labouteley G E 

1911 

Touisset 
♦Tinkham H B 1905 

Townsend 
♦CopelandWWl904 

Turners Falls 
♦Farnsworth R L 

1897 

♦Goddard G A 1890 

Harlow J A 1912 

Hosmer C I 1910 

Upton 
Whitney C A 1889 

Uxbridge 
♦Hay ward R L 1896 

Vineyard Haven 

♦CrowellCAJrl900 
♦Walker HE 1900 

Waban 
Tupper B 1905 

Wakefield 
Whitney C E 1912 

Walpole 
♦Smith J R 1889 
♦Robbins D W 1894 

Waltham 
♦Swift G A 1871 
Wellington J W 

1908 
Willard G B 1892 

Ware 

Beeman F S 1910 
♦BuffingtonCO 1885 

Wareham 

Stone AH 1880 

Warren 

♦Day W L 1885 

HitchcockDG 1874 

♦Warriner A A 1873 



Warwick 

♦Witherell G A 1904 

Watertown 
♦Davenport A M 

1891 

DickinsonDW1890 

Heald J M 1912 

♦Ladd J 1905 

♦Spooner F A 1876 

Waverley 
♦Jones C W 1901 

Wayland 
♦Braman S M 1890 

Wellesley 

♦Knox H C 1907 

Wellesley Farms 

♦Boutelle A A 1899 

West Acton 
♦Whitcomb AM 1894 

West Barnstable 
Bursley A P 1911 
Daniel J 1908 

MacomberEL 1901 

West Berlin 
Felton T P 1890 
Nutting C A 1896 

Westboro 

Bartholomew P 

1908 

Browne C W 1885 

♦Kelly E N 1910 

Nourse A M 1889 

West Boylston 

♦Cheever H M 1903 

West Bridgewater 

♦Alger G W 1889 

♦Howard J C 1879 

West Brookfield 

Paulsen G W 1910 

Phelps H D 1909 

West Dedham 
♦Soule G W 1893 

Westfield 

Allen P W 1911 

♦Fowler J H 1886 

♦Gowdy H M 1882 

Higgins A W 1907 

♦Searle G W 1907 

♦Tinker C A 1903 

Westford 

♦Howard J H 1901 

Read H B 1895 

Westhampton 

Clapp R K 1912 

♦Higgins N F 1893 

West Harwich 

♦Bearse A W 1911 

Nickerson JP 1898 

West Lynn 
Norton C A 1897 

West Medway 

Howe C S 1887 

West Millbury 
Watkins FA 1907 



* Non Graduate. 



GEOGRAPHICAL INDEX 



75^ 



Westminster 

MossmanFW 1890 

West Newbury 

Grover R B 1872 

West Newton 

Bellamy J 1876 

Howard H M 1891 

Hoyt F S 1893 

Nielsen G A 1911 

West Roxbury 

*Davis A 1895 

Manley L 1894 

West Somerville 

*Merrill C E 1911 

Willis G N 1905 

West Springfield 

*Bagg E O 1895 

*Sprague C E 1905 

*Sykes C S 1905 

West Sterling 

Shepard L J 1896 

West Stockbridge 

Tobey F C 1895 

Westwood 
Crane H L 1900 
West Wrentham 
Pauly HA 1911 

Whateley 
*White H K 1888 
*White LA 1889 

Williamsville 
*Hemenway F E 

1901 

Williamsburg 

Pierpont J E 1912 

Winchendon 

*Adams G A 1889 

Winchester 

Allen H F 1897 
*Cabot G D 1912 
*Higgins W E 1903 
*Huse F R 1889 
*Perkins EL 1903 

Winter Hill 
*Norris E J 1912 
*Richardson H L 

1903 
Rideout H N W 

1887 
Wollaston 
*Huntington R E 

1905 
Melendy A E 1893 

Worcester 

AckermanAJ 1912 

*Baird E J 1912 

*Carter H R 1908 

*Clementson L T 

1907 
Cowles F C 1872 
*Curtis W E 1910 
*Dee J F 1912 

*Draper J E 1908 
*Engstrom N 1907 
*Gates C A 1909 
Hague H 1875 



*Handy L M 1909 

*Jones E S 1882 

Kimball F E 1872 

*Leach F H 1876 

Marshall J L 1896 

McGarr T A 1912 

Moore H W 1896 

Morse R W 1902 

Neale H J 1909 

*0'Donnell J F 

1909 

O'Flynn G B 1912 

*Parker C H 1893 

*Pearce E E 1909 

*Perry AD 1881 

*Putnam H A 1882 

*Russell E E 1891 

Swan R W 1879 

*Sweet C R 1909 

ThompsonEE 1871 

*ThompsonEF 1894 

*ThompsonHA1898 

*Trainor O F 1909 

* Vaughn R H 1895 

Waugh T F 1908 

*WheeldonA J 1908 

*Woodward W F 

1910 

Woronoco 

Oertel C A 1910 



MICHIGAN 

Detroit 

Landers M B 1900 
Philbrick E D 1908 

East Lansing 
Halligan C P 1903 
Lyman R P 1892 
Taft L R 1882 

Wyandotte 
Suhlke HA 1905 



MINNESOTA 

Clayton 
Ostrolenk B 1911 

Minneapolis 
Whitney WC 1872 

St. Paul 
Lee L K 1875 



MISSISSIPPI 

Holly Springs 
Bailey J C 1910 

Jackson 
Hubert Z T 1904 



MISSOURI 

Kansas City 

WoodburyRP 1878 

St. Louis 

Everson J N 1910 

*Morse S L 1896 



MONTANA 

Bozeman 

Cooley F S 1888 
Cooley R A 1895 
Jennison H M 1903 
Parker J R 1903 
Schermerhorn L G 
1910 
Great Falls 
CampbellGH 1879 
ChapmanLW 1908 

Hangan 
Shaw E I 1912 

Helena 
Barlow WD 1909 
Lamedeer 
*Eddy J R 1897 

Malta 
*Sanford GO 1894 

Miles City 

Miles G M 1875 

Thompson 

*Beebe J C 1909 

NEBRASKA 

Columbus 

DickinsonRS 1879 

Nebraska City 
Dwyer C E 1902 

Norfolk 
*Sattler H C 1881 



NEW 
HAMPSHIRE 

Berlin 

Taft WE 1890 

Centre Harbor 

*Slade D R 1876 

Derry Village 
*Ranney W H 1893 

Fitzwilliam Depot 
*Treat C E 1909 

Freedom 
*Brooks W C 1881 

Greenland 
*Harris L L 1882 

Hampton Falls 

*Healey G C 1873 

Littleton 

CarpenterDF 1886 

O' Grady J R 1909 

Sullivan M J 1895 

Manchester 

Gallagher J A 1912 

Milton 

*RockwoodAF 1910 
Nashua 
Allen F S 1882 

*Bancroft J F 1872 
Hammar J F 1896 
Saunders E B 1902 

*Stevens F O 1906 



New Boston 

Hartford A A 1907 

Peterboro 

Bishop E A 1883 
Caldwell WH 1887 

Walpole 

Putnam C S 1 909 

Winchester 

*Allen E W 1894 

NEW JERSEY 

Arlington 
*Stearns HE 1897 

Belvidere 
*Paul A R 1904 

Boonton 
*Condit CD 1892 
MaynardHE 1899 

Camden 
Sexton G F ■ 1909 

Carteret 
Bangs B W 1908 

East Orange 

Fairfield F H 1881 

* Jackson H S 1875 

Sawyer AH 1891 

Whaley J S 1909 

Elizabeth 
Winn E L 1911 

Englishtown 
Stockbridge F G 

1892 

Hackensack 
*Ober F A 1872 : 

Hammonton 
Myrick L 1878 

Jersey City 

Bacon S C 1903 

Hastings A T 1906 

*Wollheim E 19 03 

Long Branch 

*Maps C H 1909 

Montclair 

Anderson J A 1908 

*Holmes S J 1882 

Newark 

Coleman W J 1908 

Smith S L 1902 

Walker J H 1907 

Warden R D 1898 

New Brunswick 
Blake MA 1904 
Burr F H 1912 

Farley A J 1908 

Orange 
Cutter FA 1907 

PlainfielJ 

Gay R P 1905 

*Risley C E 1900 

Princeton 

Hill N H 1911 

South Orange 
*Page H S 1892: 



* Non Graduate. 



76 



GEOGRAPHICAL INDEX 



Union Hill 
Baker J B 1901 

Woodbine 
♦Lipman I 1910 

NEW MEXICO 

Claud 

Stacy C E 1899 

Laplanta 

.FisherdickCW1887 

Roswell 
Yeaw FL 1905 

NEW YORK 

Albany 
Eastman P M 1908 
Felt E P 1891 

Linblad R C 1909 

Amsterdam 

Kelton J R 1905 

Brooklyn 

♦Adams F E 1874 

-♦Durling E V 1912 

, Fitzgerald J J 1912 

Foley T P 1895 

Frost A F 1900 

Wright G H 1898 

Buffalo 

♦Barton C H 1894 
Filer H B 1906 
\ Clark M H Jr 1907 
♦Paine AW 1887 
♦Parker F I 1894 

Canton 

Armstrong R P 

1910 
♦TownsleyHM 1880 

Cornwall-on 

Hudson 

Clapp FL 1896 

Deposit 

♦Wheeler G W 1886 

Gansevoort 
-♦Cary W E 1910 

Geneva 

Hodgkiss H E 1902 

Wellington R 1906 

Greenport 

♦Courtney HS 1899 

Greensville 
♦Hogan F W 1890 

Hastings-on 

Hudson 

♦Woolson G C 1871 

Highland 
Weaver W J 1912 

Hilton 

White H M 1904 

Ithaca 

Gilbert AW 1904 

Nagai I 1911 

Patch R H 1911 

♦Rosenbaum J 1911 



Larchmont 

*Bullard W E 1872 

Little Falls 
*Oppel E I 1912 

Maybrook 
Strain B 1906 

Mexico 
Curran D J 1912 

Milton 
Clarke W R 1910 

Moravia 
Oliver J T 1909 

Morrisville 

Eastman J F 1907 

Mt. Lebanon 

♦Allen E B 1897 

Newburgh 

Nourse DO 1883 

New York City 

♦Allen F C 1887 
Ateshian O H 1886 
Ayres W 1886 

Eaton J S 1898 
Barrett J F 1875 
Bassett A L 1871 
BealsAT 1892 
Chapin HE 1881 
Codding G M 1909 
Cutter J A 1882 
DeLuce E 1896 
Eaton J S 1898 
Eaton W A 1886 
Foot S D 1878 

Gay W W 1891 
Hazen M S 1910 
HendersonFHl893 
Hevia A A 1883 
Hull E T 1900 

Johnson W C 1910 
Leavens G D 1897 
Lewis H W 1895 

♦Lumbard J E 1889 
Miller DP 1908 

♦Morris F W 1872 
Morse W L 1895 

♦Parker J 1895 

Racicot PA 1911 

*Raitt J A 1907 

Rawson E B 1881 
Russell WD 1898 

♦Smith B S 1881 
Tekirian B O 1885 
Thompsons C 1872 

♦UrnerFG 1877 
Wales RW 1912 
Walker CM 1899 
Walker C F 1894 

♦ Warden J K 1902 
New York Mills 

♦Hastings D B 1910 

Nyack-on-Hudson 
*Dutcher J R 1899 
*Smith AH 1909 

Pelham 
Whitaker C L 1905 

Philmont 

*Lindsay F B 1882 



Port Chester 

*HendersonEHl895 

Rochester 
HutchingsJT 1889 

Roslyn 
West D N 1902 
Saratoga Springs 
♦Goodenough H H 
1905 

Schenectady 
Barry J E 1901 
Barry T A 1908 

Spring Valley 
Curtis AC 1894 

Syracuse 
Bowman C A 1881 

Washington Ville 

Howell H 1885 

West Brighton 

♦LambertMW 1909 

Worcester 

Peckham C 1912 

NORTH 
CAROLINA 

Charlotte 
Mueller A F 1912 

Mt. HoUy 

♦Nims L 1878 

Red Springs 

LivermoreRW1872 

Salem 
♦McNayr RS 1911 

OHIO 

Akron 
♦Cook J E 1894 

Cleveland 

Howe C S 1878 
Staples H F 1893 

Columbus 

Belden J H 1902 
Jones R S 1895 
Lyman J F 1905 
Plumb C S 1882 
Kent 
♦Davey J A 1911 

Ravenna 
*Whittaker E C 

1911 

Salem 

♦Clark W J 1873 

Toledo 

♦Dudley F S 1907 

Wickliffe 

Cloues W A 1910 

Wooster 

Whitmarsh R D 
1908 

OKLAHOMA 

Boley 
Hood W L 1903 



OREGON 

Corvallis 

Flint C L 1908 

Peok A L 1904 

Lewis CI 1902 

Medford 
Robinson E J 1912 

North Portland 

Chase W E 1887 

Portland 

Henshaw F F 1904 

♦Prouty FA 1911 

Rogue River 

Chandler E P 1874 

Salem 
Turner H A 1912 



PENNSYLVANIA 

Ardmore 

Peters F C 1907 

Bethlehem 
Shimer B L 1888 

Carnegie 
♦Phillips L 1903 

Emporium 

♦Brown I C 1911 

Farm School 

Bishop W H 1882 

WashburnJH 1878 

Glenolden 
Knapp E E 1888 

Grove City 

Torrey RE 1912 

Hanover 

♦Charmsbury T H 
1897 

Harrisburg 

CraigheadWH1906 
Kellogg J W 1900 

Philadelphia 
Claflin L C 1902 
Crocker C S 1889 
FairbanksHS 1895 
Fiske E R 1872 
Fowler A L 1880 
GoessmannCI 1895 
Lane C B 1897 
Moore R B 1888 
Tolman W N 1887 

Pittsburgh 

*Curtis J G 1907 

Gelinas L E 1912 

♦Turner L H 1909 

Reading 
Holland H L 1912 

State College 
Adams J F 1911 
Smith C A 1911 
Waldron R A 1910 
Wilde E I 1912 



* Non Graduate. 



GEOGRAPHICAL INDEX 



77 



RHODE ISLAND 

Allenton 

*ThompsonLI 1903 

Chepachet 
*Sprague W A 1889 

East Greenwich 
Madison F S 1912 

Kingston 
*Brett C E 1905 
Cobb G R 1908 
Damon S C 1882 
Hartwell B L 1889 
Kinney L F 1888 
Merkle G E 1912 
Fitts F O 1912 

Nayatt Point 
Hatch W B 1905 

Oaklawn 

Read F H 1896 

Pawtucket 

Russell H L 1890 

Providence 

Cushman E C 1905 
Cutting RE 1908 
Duncan R F 1886 
Hubbard H F 1878 
*Luther G C 1871 
*Smith J M 1874 

Woonsocket 

*Rankin A B 1871 



SOUTH 
CAROLINA 

Columbia 

Young C E 1881 

Orangeburg 
Hubert B F 1912 

SOUTH DAKOTA 

Brookings 
Bailey D E 1910 
Brigham A A 1878 

Sioux Falls 
Martin W E 1876 



TENNESSEE 

Athens 

Taylor F P 1881 
Columbia 

CarruthersJT 1907 

Knoxville 
Willis L G 1909 

TEXAS 

Dallas 

Wood H P 1907 

Houston 
Paige W C 1891 

Raymondville 
*Wood A R 1891 



Victoria 

*Tyng C 1892 

*Tyng G 1892 

VERMONT 

Ascutneyville 
*Bristol E F 1880 

Bellows Falls 
*Kelley H T 1903 

Bethel 

*Bass E L 1879 

Brattleboro 

*Barrows F K 1873 

Burlington 

Hills J L 1881 

Jones C H 1890 

East Putney 
Alpin G T 1882 

Hyde Park 
Crosby H P 1909 

Northfield 
Sanborn M L 1905 
Taft WO 1906 

Pittsford Mills 
♦Leonard L E 1910 

Putney 

Campbell F G 1875 

Randolph Centre 

Turner E H 1910 

Richford 

* Marvin SB 1894 

St. Johnsbury 

* Whitney J F 1907 

Vershire 
♦Taylor E E 1895 

Windsor 

North M N 1889 

VIRGINIA 

Blacksburg 

Fletcher S W 1896 

Richmond 

CarpenterFB 1887 
French G T 1906 



WASHINGTON 

Auburn 
Cutler H 1909 

Everett 
Quigley R A 1904 

Pullman 

*West H L 1897 

Seattle 

*Palmer R M 1886 

Spalding AW 1881 

South Bend 

Couden F D 1904 

Spokane 

*Wood W 1881 

Tacoma 

Ray moth R RJ1904 

LStricklandGP 1871 



WEST VIRGINIA 

Morgantown 
Dacy A L 1902 

Wheeling 
Baker H 1900 

WISCONSIN 

Beloit 
*Denslow R A 1911 

Madison 

MendumSW 1910 

Tottingham W E 

1903 

Racine 

Potter R C 1909 

Milwaukee 

Carr W F 1881 

♦Potter J S 1908 

WYOMING 

Cody 

Thompson M W 

1909 



FOREIGN 

Africa (South) 

Gowdey C C 1908 

LounsburyCP 1894 

Asia 

China 

Hsieh EL 1909 

Jen H 1909 

Liang L K 1908 

*Tong Y H 1912 

India 

Knight J B 1892 
ThompsonCB 1907 

Japan 

♦Arimoto S 1907 
Kuroda S 1895 

Mishima V Y 1888 
Nagai I 1911 

♦Okami Y 1889 

Saito S 1896 

Tsuda G 1896 

*Yamamura K 1893 

Phillipine Islands 
Edwards H T 1896 
♦NewcombRW 1910 
NickersonGP 1911 
Nickless F P 1910 



EUROPE 

England 

Rice C L 1901 

Turkey 

AdjemianAG 1898 
NersessionPN 1903 



NORTH AMERICA 

Canada 

BrownGMJr 1909 

Curran D A 1909 

Higgins C H 1894 

♦McDonald F J 

1892 
Sharpe AH 1911 



Costa Rica 
*Volio E T 1895 

Cuba 
Cardin P P 1909 
Herreo J M 1890- 
Leonard W E 1910 
Thurston F E 1908 
Turner H W 1909 

Hawaiian Islands 
Back E A 1904 
Bartlett E G 1907 

♦Goodell J S 1894- 
Larsen L D 1908 

♦Nowell AM 1897 
Partridge FH 19 10* 
Willard H E 1911 



Mexico 

Canto Y H 
Sastre S V 



1900* 
1896 



Panama 
*Nash E D 1871 



Puerto Rico 

Armstrong W H 

1899* 
Beaman D 1899 
Cowles H T 1910 
Crossman S S 1909^ 
Jones T H 1908 
Smith R I 1901 
Tower W V 1903 



SOUTH AMERICA 

Almeida A L 1887 
Almeida L J 1885 
Braune D H 1883- 
Lage O V B 1891 
Porto R M 1877 
Tinoco L A F 1893- 

Brazil 

Torelly F D 1887 
♦Gregory J H 189 J 

Central America 
*Clark W O 1874 

West Indies 
Ballou HA 1895 



* Non Graduate. 






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TO THE STATE 




AMHERST, MASS., 



Vol. V. 



V-A-0- BnU«tixi. S«pt.l&13 



No. s 



Published six times a year by the Massachusetts Agricultural College. Jannary, February, 

March, May, September and October, 

Entered as secoud-class matter at the Postoffice, Amherst, Mass. 



Introductory Statement 



Within the last few years the Massachusetts Agricultural College has 
undergone almost a complete reorganization. The present plan of organi- 
zation may be classified into four divisions — College work, the teaching of 
four year students ; The Experiment Station, research and investigational 
work ; The Graduate School, offering courses of study leading to advanced 
degrees ; and The Extension Service, which is the organized effort to make 
every department of the institution contribute what it can toward the build- 
ing up of the industrial and especially the rural life of the Commonwealth. 

This bulletin, entitled "Sending the College to the State", describes very 
briefly the helps that the citizens of Massachusetts may secure from the 
College. It is in no sense a report of the Extension Service. It is issued 
in response to a large number of calls which have been coming in asking 
for information on this subject. 

Those desiring help on agricultural problems should write to the Director 
or to the person whose name is given at the end of the paragraph describing 
each activity. 

William D. Hurd, 

Director of The Extension Service. 
Amherst, Massachusetts, September i, 1913. 



SHORT COURSES GIVEN AT THE COLLEGE 

The short courses of the Massachusetts Agricultural College are 
offered to meet the needs of those, both old and young, who desire to study 
principles and modern methods of agriculture but who, for various reasons, 
are unable to come to the College for any great length of time. In these 
courses, the latest investigations in agricultural science are brought before 
the student and their practical application is clearly pointed out. The in- 
struction, for the most part, is given by the heads of departments of the 
College. To supplement this teaching a large corps of non-resident lecturers 
and men who have made marked successes in their chosen lines of work 
are engaged each year. 

(A) WINTER SCHOOLS 
i. The Ten Weeks Courses 

These courses comprise instruction in soil fertility, field crops, breeding 
and feeding of animals, dairying, bacteriology, animal diseases and sani- 
tation, poultry breeding and management, fruit growing and market garden- 
ing, landscape gardening, floriculture, forestry, botany, entomology, con- 
struction of farm buildings, farm accounting, farm mechanics, sanitary 
science, beekeeping, the organization and development of rural life and 
rural improvement. Other courses will be added from time to time as the 
need arises. 

The courses open about January i every year. A bulletin fully describing 
them is issued in October. A registration fee of five dollars is charged. 
Board and room may be had at reasonable rates. 

For bulletin giving dates and other information, write William D. Hurd, 
Director, Amherst, Mass. 

2. The Apple Packing School 

The instruction in this school is given by the Department of Pom- 
ology, under the direction of Prof. F. C. Sears, assisted by experts from 
this and other states. It is a practical course, one or two weeks in length, 
in which the actual work of grading and packing fruit is taken up. Per- 
sons taking the course will become familiar enough with the various packs 
to enable them to do commercial packing. In connection with the packing 
work, lectures are given on the leading phases of commercial orcharding 
such as planting, varieties, spraying, pruning, harvesting, marketing, and so 
forth. 

A fee of five dollars for one week or ten dollars for two weeks, to help 
cover cost of fruit and packing material used, is charged. 

The course is given about the third week in January each year. 

For descriptive circular giving program, dates, and so forth, write 
William D. Hurd, Director, Amherst, Mass. 

3. Farmers Week 

Farmers Week is given for the benefit of those who cannot come to 
the College for more than a few days. It is very largely attended and has 
come to be "the big event*' in agricultural circles in the state each year. 

The work is divided into several sections, namely :-(i) General Agri- 
culture and Farm Management, (2) Dairying, Animal Husbandry and Poul- 
try, (3) Horticulture, including fruit growing, market gardening, floriculture 
and forestry, (4) Women's Section, home economics, household manage- 
ment, and so forth. 



These sections take up the time from early morning until late afternoon. 
Prominent men are engaged for the evening lectures. 

Fruit, corn, dairy, poultry shows, and other exhibits have come to be 
among the leading features of Farmers Week. No fee is charged. Farmers' 
Week is held about the middle of March each year. A complete program 
is issued about Feb. i. For this and other information write William D. 
Hurd, Amherst, Mass. 

4. The Beekeepers Course and Convention 

The short course for beekeepers is under the immediate direction of 
Dr. Burton N. Gates. Instruction is given by Dr. Gates, other members of 
the faculty, and well-known apiarists, in the manipulation of bees, rearing of 
queens, production of comb and extracted honey, diseases of bees and their 
treatment, beekeepers' supplies and equipment, relation of bees to poMma* 
tion of plants, structure and life history of bees, crops for honey bees, and so 
forth. Excursions are taken to large apiaries for study and observation. 

The course is closed by an annual convention of beekeepers at which 
time extensive exhibits are arranged and lectures and demonstrations are 
given by the leading apiarists in this country. 

The course usually opens the last of May each year and continues for 
two weeks. A registration fee of two dollars is charged to cover cost of 
material used. There are no other fees. Board and room may be had at 
low rates. 

For program of the course and convention, dates, and so forth, write 
William D. Hurd, Director, Amherst Mass. 

(B) THE SUMMER SCHOOL 
1. The Summer School of Agriculture and Country Life 

This summer school is designed for teachers, superintendents, school 
committeemen, farm owners, clergymen, librarians, social workers and those 
who have a general interest in agriculture and country life. Instruction is 
given in soils, field crops, domestic animals, dairying, poultry breeding and 
management, fruit growing, gardening, trees and shrubs, flower growing, 
forestry, landscape gardening, chemistry, plant life and experiments, botany, 
bird life, insect life, and entomology, beekeeping, handicrafts and practical 
arts, home economics, agricultural education, hygiene, organized play and 
recreation, school gardens, agricultural economics, rural^sociology, com- 
munity organization and development, rural literature, and? so forth. New 
courses are added each year. 

Round table discussions and educational trips are arranged by the in- 
structors as their courses require. 

A School for Rural Social Workers is especially arranged for clergymen 
and others. This comes during the last two weeks of the regular Summer 
School. 

Evening lectures, excursions to points of historic interest and scenic 
beauty, and social evenings are arranged by those in charge. 

The Summer School usually opens the first Tuesday of July each year. 
A registration fee of five dollars is charged. Board and room are furnished 
at low rates. 

Amherst is located in one of the most noted historical and educational 
centres in this country. The work of the Summer School is unique and has 
become widely known as the "Amherst Movement". Anyone interested in 
problems pertaining to rural life should not fail to attend. 



A bulletin giving full information on courses of study, expenses and so 
forth is published in March each year. For this, write William D. Hurd, 
Director, Amherst, Mass. 

2. The Conference of Community Leaders 

This conference is held as a closing feature of the Summer School 
each year. In it, the larger problems of New England community 
development are freely discussed. The following organizations co- 
operate with the College in providing the programs; — The Massachusetts 
Federation of Churches, the State Board of Education, The Free Public 
Library Commission, The Massachusetts Civic League, the State Board of 
Health, the County Work of the Y. M. C. A., the New England Home 
Economics Association, and the Bureau of Statistics. 

Section meetings of these groups are held each forenoon, a general round 
table discussion is held each afternoon, and lectures are delivered each 
evening by persons prominent in social and educational work. Many small 
group conferences are also arranged. 

Extensive exhibits showing in a graphic way what organizations -and 
communities are doing along welfare lines are arranged at the time of the 
Conference. 

The Conference usually lasts four days, coming the last of July and first of 
August. A full program is published about June i. There are no regis- 
tration or other fees. 

For the program and detailed information, address William D. Hurd, 
Director, Amherst, Mass. 

3. The Boys Camp 

The Boys Camp is arranged in order that boys from rural districts 
and small towns may receive some instruction in agriculture, clean whole- 
some sports, and that they may have impressed upon them their responsibili- 
ties as coming members of society. Teachers, clergymen, Y. M. C. A. 
workers are especially urged to send boys who will be benefited by the 
instruction given at this Camp. 

The Camp is under the strictest military discipline. Boys who do not 
care to conform to this are not expected to come. Not more than forty-two 
boys,— reservation being made for three from each county,— will be taken at 
one time. A succession of these camps, each lasting one week, may be 
arranged during July. The cost to each boy has, in the past, been seven 
dollars for the week. This fee helps defray the cost of maintaining the 
camp, meals, instruction, lectures, and so forth. 

The daily program consists of Camp duty, flag raising, and so forth ; 
agricultural lessons, talks on hygiene, good citizenship and so forth ; play 
and recreation, instruction in handicrafts, photography, evening camp fires, 
and lectures by men prominent in boys' work. 

For detailed program, registration blanks and other information, write 
William D. Hurd, Director, Amherst, Mass. 

4. The Poultry Convention 

For several years a short poultry course, two weeks in length, was 
held at the College. As a substitute for this, ten weeks' instruction is now 
given in this subject during the winter school and a poultry convention is 
held. To accommodate poultrymen, the convention is now held in July and 
is under the immediate direction of Professor J. C. Graham, 



Three or four days of practical lectures and demonstrations on such sub- 
lets as breeds and breeding, incubation and brooding, feeding, care and 
management, poultry diseases, poultry house construction, caponizing, and 
so forth, are given by poultry experts who come from all sections of the 
country. 

This convention is very largely attended. No registration or other fees 
are charged. For dates, detailed program or other information, write 
William D. Hurd, Director, Amherst, Mass. 

(C) MISCELLANEOUS SHORT COURSES 

For some time there has been a call from several groups in the state doing 
agricultural work or dealing in agricultural products and materials, for help 
from the College. In order to be of assistance to these, short courses have 
been or are being arranged. 

i. The School for Tree Wardens 

This school is held in response to a call from tree wardens and city 
foresters for instruction in the planting, care and preservation of trees. The 
State Forester and the Massachusetts Forestry Association cooperate with 
the College in giving the work. 

Instruction is given in tree planting, forestry practices, diseases of trees, 
insects affecting trees, spraying, pruning, tree surgery, sprayers and appa- 
ratus, shade tree surveys, civic improvement, duties of tree wardens, laws 
and regulations, and so forth. 

The course is held at the College about the fourth week in March and 
lasts from three to five days. An Extension School in these subjects will 
probably also be arranged at some convenient point in the eastern part of 
the state. 

No resistration or other fees are charged. The cost of board and room is 
low. For dates, detailed programs and other information, write William 
D. Hurd, Director, Amherst, Mass. 

2. Short Courses lor Other Groups 

Plans are now under way to provide short courses at Amherst, lasting 
four or five days for fertilizer agents, feed agents and dealers, milk in- 
spectors, seed dealers and any other groups that may desire such instruction. 
Plans, dates, programs and so forth can be had by writing William D. 
Hurd, Director, Amherst, Mass. 

3. Special Days for Foreigners 

Each year there are provided at the College special days for foreign- 
ers, especially the Polish farmers who have come into the Connecticut 
Valley in large numbers. 

Instruction is given in the crops and animals in which these people are 
most interested, soil management, cooperation, the need of their 
becoming good American citizens, Polish history, and so forth. The work 
is made more effective by the help of an interpreter. 

Polish Farmers' Day is held during the last week in March. 

Similar work will gladly be arranged at the College or in different sections 
of the state for Italians, Hebrews, Portugese or other nationalities which 
are settling in colonies. 

For dates of those now being held and to make the necessary arrange- 
ments for new work, write William D. Hurd, Director, Amherst, Mass. 



4. Meetings of Organizations at the College 

For years it has been customary for the various state organizations of 
fruit growers, poultrymen, breeders' associations, farmers' clubs, granges, 
boards of trade and others to meet for conventions, picnics, and so forth at 
the College. These meetings have always been welcomed by the College 
authorities and organizations are cordially invited to hold future meetings 
at the College. The Extension Service will be glad to provide facilities for 
seeing College grounds, help arrange programs and other forms of 
entertainment. Plans should be made some time in advance in 
order that convenient dates may be selected and conflicts in meetings avoid- 
ed. To make such arrangements, write William D. Hurd, Director, 
Amherst, Mass. 

Itinerant Instruction Arranged at the College But Given Through- 
out the State 

i. Correspondence Courses 

The Correspondence Courses in Agriculture are offered to people who 
cannot attend the short courses at the College. Instruction by correspon- 
dence is now offered in soils and soil improvement, manures and fertilizers, 
field crops, farm dairying, fruit growing, market gardening, animal feeding, 
floriculture, farm accounting, entomology, pedagogy of agriculture, beekeep- 
ing, forestry, shade tree management, agriculture in elementary schools, 
community cooperation in elementary education, poultry husbandry. Home 
Economics and others will be offered in the near future. 

The lessons have been especially prepared in most cases by the heads of 
departments at the College. 

A fee of one dollar is charged for each course. Registration is limited to 
residents of Massachusetts. 

It is suggested that granges, men's clubs, Y. M. C. A's, women's clubs and 
other organizations form classes and have these conducted by a local lead- 
er. When this is done, the supervisor of the Correspondence Courses will 
meet with the class from time to time to assist in conducting the work. 

For circular describing these courses and for other information, write 
Erwin H. Forbush, Supervisor of Correspondence Courses, Amherst, 
Mass. 

2. The Lectures and Demonstrations 

The members of the faculty of the College are glad to give lectures 
and demonstrations before granges, men's clubs, women's clubs, Y. M. C. 
A's, farmers' clubs, boards of trade and other organizations. A list of more 
than thirty lecturers and two hundred subjects on various phases of 
agriculture, country life, economics, sociology, education, civic betterment, 
and various scientific subjects has been prepared. Full courses of lectures 
or single lectures may be arranged. 

Organizations arranging the lectures are asked to pay traveling expenses 
of the lecturer provided no admission to the lecture is charged. If ad- 
mission is charged, then the lecturer is entitled to a fee in addition to travel- 
ing expenses. 

The College has also arranged a " Lecture without a Lecturer " scheme. 
A set of slides, a stereopticon and a reading lecture are sent out to reliable 
parties. The following lectures are ready for 1914: — Clean Milk Production, 
Apple Growing, Types and Breeds of Animals, Culture of Corn, Potato 



7 

Growing. Home and School Ground Decoration, The Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural College, its Organization and Work. Other subjects will be an- 
nounced later. A rental fee of one dollar and express charges both ways 
are charged for one of these lectures. 

No doubt the most satisfactory way of impressing new and up-to-date 
methods upon people's minds is by Practical Demonstrations. Whenever 
possible, the following demonstrations will be given : — Production and 
Handling of Milk, Babcock Milk Testing, Scoring and Judging Live Stock, 
Scoring and Judging Poultry, Spraying and Pruning Trees, Packing Fruit, 
Grafting, Corn Judging and demonstrations in Beekeeping. Others may be 
arranged on request. 

To secure single lectures or for assistance in arranging courses of lectures 
and so forth, write Erwin H. Forbush, Supervisor of Correspondence 
and Lecture Courses, Amherst, Mass. 

3. Extension Schools 

Probably the most valuable work done away from the College is in the 
" Extension Schools." The college sends a corps of instructors to a town 
for a five day school of instruction. At present, the following courses are 
offered : —soil fertility, animal husbandry and dairying, fruit growing, poultry 
and home economics. 

It is also possible to arrange special Extension Schools along one line of 
work, such as fruit growing or any other subject in which the College has 
facilities for giving the work. 

Communities desiring an Extension School make a written request for the 
same, agreeing to defray all local expenses such as the rent, heating and 
lighting of a suitable hall, and the board of the instructors during the school. 

For circulars describing these schools, and to make the necessary arrange- 
ments, write Earnest D. Waid, Assistant Director, Amherst, Mass. 

4. Educational Exhibits at Fairs and Other Shows 

The College cooperates with the managers of fairs, industrial exposi- 
tions, corn shows, poultry shows, fruit shows and other exhibitions by mak- 
ing educational exhibits. 

For outside work, a large tent has been provided. In this about thirty 
cabinets containing educational material are arranged in an attractive way. 
Accompanying the exhibit is a corps of lecturers and demonstrators who 
give practical instruction daily. 

For inside work a space at least 40x60 feet is required for this exhibit. 

Smaller exhibits along special lines are sent to corn, fruit and poultry 
shows, child welfare exhibits, milk shows and so forth. 

The managers of fairs and exhibits are asked to help defray the expenses 
of putting on these exhibits. 

For dates, terms, contract blanks, and to make the necessary arrange- 
ments, write Earnest D. Waid, Assistant Director, Amherst, Mass. 

5. Educational Trains 

The College, through the Extension Service, is glad to cooperate with 
railroad and trolley lines in the operation of educational trains and cars- 
The railroad usually furnishes the means of transportation and looks after 
the operation of the train or cars. The College furnishes the exhibit and 
provides the lectures and demonstrations. To arrange these trains, write 
William D. Hurd, Director, Amherst, Mass. 



EXTENSION WORK CONDUCTED IN DIFFERENT PARTS 
OF THE STATE 

1. Extension Work in Fruit Growing 

This work is carried on in connection with and under the direction of 
the Department of Pomology. It consists chiefly in lectures and demonstra- 
tions on laying out and planting orchards, pruning, spraying, thinning, grad- 
ing, packing and marketing fruits. 

Demonstration orchards, new and renovation plots, are being established 
all over the state cooperatively between the College and the owners of land. 

Extension Schools of fruit growing and fruit grading and packing will 
be arranged on request. 

Advice is given as to selection of land for orchards, their care and man- 
agement, and visits to farms for this advisory work are made so far as 
possible. 

Correspondence on orcharding subjects is invited. 

Address inquiries on these subjects to Ralph W. Rees, Extension In- 
structor in P'omology, Amherst, Mass. 

2. Extension Work in Dairying and Animal Husbandry 

The work in these subjects is carried on in connection with the de- 
partments of Dairying and Animal Husbandry at the College. At the 
present time, we are prepared to furnish assistance and advice in organizing 
Dairy Improvement Associations and Breeders' Associations, to give lec- 
tures and demonstrations on subjects pertaining to milk production, hand 
ling and marketing butter, and cheese making ; instruction in barn planing, 
Babcock testing, selecting and judging animals, breeding and feeding, and 
helps on swine and sheep raising. Milk and dairy herd record blanks will 
be furnished free. Stock judging contests for boys are arranged at the 
leading fairs. City milk inspectors may receive instruction for their work 
in feeding, scoring stables, and so forth. Communities desiring to have 
campaigns conducted which seek to educate producers, dealers, consumers 
and the general public as to the production of clean safe milk may make 
arrangements for these. Exhibits are available for milk shows, child wel- 
fare exhibits and other exhibitions. 

Those desiring helps on the subjects of milk and dairying, or who wish to 
arrange for any of the work mentioned above should write George F. 
Story, Extension Instructor in Dairying and Animal Husbandry, Amherst, 
Mass. 

3. Extension Work in Poultry Husbandry 

The Poultry Department of the College is prepared to help the 
poultrymen of the state in several ways. 

Conferences may be arranged both at the College and at the plant of the 
owner on questions of general poultry management, diseases, mating, laying 
out and planning the buildings and other projects. 

Cooperative work with state institutions, country schools of agriculture, 
agricultural departments in high schools, manual training departments in 
public and normal schools and with individuals will be arranged on request. 
Exhibits of poultry appliances and educational equipment are also made. 

Poultry clubs with boys and girls, instruction in poultry raising by corres- 
pondence, poultry surveys, lectures and demonstrations and poultry judging 
at Extension Schools, poultry shows, fairs, granges, men's clubs, boards of 
trade and other organizations will be arranged. 



For information and advice on poultry matters, or to arrange for any of 
the things mentioned above, write John C. Graham, Professor of Poultry 
Husbandry, Amherst, Mass. 

4. Extension Work in Farm Management, Field Studies and 

Demonstrations 

This work is carried on cooperatively between the College and the 
office of Farm Management of the United States Department of Agriculture 
at Washington. The work consists in studying farm conditions and farm 
management problems ; in instruction in keeping farm accounts, for which 
the necessary blanks are furnished at cost ; in demonstration work and 
growing field crops ; in the use of fertilizers and lime ; in giving advice as to 
farm equipment, buildings, and so forth ; in aiding farmers to cooperate ; in 
making farm surveys ; giving lectures and helps through personal visits to 
farms. 

Cooperative demonstration work in hay growing, use of fertilizers, good 
seeds, crop rotation and so forth may be arranged on request. 

For information, record blanks, plans for cooperative work, and to make 
arrangements for personal visits to farms, write Herbert J. Baker, 
Extension Instructor in Farm Management, Amherst, Mass. 

5. Extension Work in Civic Betterment 

This work is carried on in connection with and under the direction of 
the Department of Landscape Gardening at the College. Assistance can be 
given in all kinds of rural and village improvement enterprises such as the 
planting and care of shade and street trees, the location, planning and equip- 
ment of playgrounds, the planning of school grounds, cemeteries and picnic 
grounds, the beautifying of water fronts, the rearrangement of and develop- 
ment of town commons, reservations of historic interest and similar matters. 
Those in charge of this work can give their best services through coopera- 
tion with local granges, men's and women's clubs, village improvement 
societies and similar organizations. 

Those desiring help and information on these subjects should write P. H. 
Ellwood, Extension Instructor in Civic Improvement, Amherst, Mass. 

6. Extension Work in Agricultural Education 

This work is carried on in connection with the Department of Agri- 
cultural Education of the College and in cooperation with the United 
States Department of Agriculture, Washington. It consists chiefly in the 
organized Boys' and Girls' Club work carried on in cooperation with the 
schools of the state. There are three types of clubs already organized, 
namely : — 

Horticultural Clubs. To encourage the study of best methods of planting 
and caring for a few of the most valuable horticultural and agricultural 
crops, carefully selected potatoes, flint corn, sweet corn, beans, and tomato 
seeds are sent to be planted in the home garden, and with each variety is sent 
a carefully prepared primer of instruction. A primer on the common varieties 
of flowers will be sent this year to those members who are interested in the 
raising of flowers. The older home garden members are encouraged to plant 
one, two or four square rods of vegetables keeping an exact account of 
products furnished the home and sold. 

The larger units of work are the twentieth-acre market gardens products 
for boys and girls under fourteen years of age ; and the tenth-acre market 
gardens for boys and girls between fourteen and eighteen years of age. 



The canning club activities are carried on in connection with the twentieth 
and tenth-acre plats. 

Agricultural Clubs. The Agricultural units are the eighth-acre of pota- 
toes and the one-half acre of corn as the minimum areas for boys and girls 
under fourteen years of age ; the quarter acre of potatoes, acre of corn, and 
the half or acre of hay are the minimum areas for boys and girls between 
fourteen and eighteen years of age. Instruction is furnished the members 
of the agricultural clubs and premiums are offered. 

Poultry Clubs. Poultry clubs are to be organized this fall to study the 
best methods of housing and feeding hens for egg production. Each 
member may start with six, twelve, or twenty-five hens. Suitable premiums 
will be awarded for best results. 

All the agricultural fairs have boys' and girls' departments with good lists 
of premiums. And there will also be held this year on December 2 and 3 a 
State Exhibit at Springfield to which boys and girls may send prize 
material. 

The educational department of the Extension Service will cooperate with 
local school departments or other organizations in organizing and promoting 
any of these lines of work. 

For information blanks, literature or advice in these subjects, write O. A. 
Morton, Extension Professor of Agricultural Education, Amherst, Mass. 

7. Extension Work in Home Economics 

The Home Economics Department stands ready to assist in solving 
problems relative to the household in the same manner as other departments 
of the Extension Service do to the problems of the farm. This coming year 
there are specific ways in which it hopes to cooperate with women. 
(1) During Farmers Week in March, when it is expected that women from 
all parts of the state will meet for the five days. At the time there will be 
lectures, demonstrations and conferences touching upon household topics in 
a most practical manner. (2) Home economics work will be carried on in 
the Summer School of 1914 similarly to that of 1913, and a program of wo- 
men's work will be made a part of the 1914 Conference. (3) The Extension 
Schools will have their women's department where talks will be given in the 
morning and demonstrations in the afternoon. (4) Requests for single lec- 
tures or demonstrations will be gladly received and arrangements made for 
such exercises. (5) Calls for assistance in farming girls' clubs and home 
economics clubs for women ; to discuss the rural school lunch problem ; to 
cooperate with any existing organization in the matter of interesting young 
people in the proper care of the home ; all such appeals will be gladly 
welcomed. 

For information or to make arrangements for any of these helps, write 
Miss Laura Comstock, Extension Professor of Home Economics, 
Amherst, Mass. 

8. Extension Work in Community Organization 

Several communities in the state have appealed to the College for 
help and advice as to how all the organizations in the community can be 
brought to a higher state of efficiency and as to what steps the communities 
themselves might take toward community development and advancement. 
The College is now prepared to make scientific studies of communities, 
which lead up, by means of surveys, to the definite organization of committees 
to study the agricultural, educational, religious, transportation, recreation 
and civic needs of the communities. Usually several state organizations 



and some national organizations are brought in to help in working these- 
plans out. 

Conferences on community affairs will be organized and held when 
requested. 

The College acts simply in an advisory capacity, the communities them- 
selves doing the actual organizing work. 

For information, to arrange conferences, and for advice on these matters, 
write E. L. Morgan, Community Field Agent, The Extension Service, 
Amherst, Mass. 

9. Auto Demonstration Outfit 

In order to reach communities all over the state more effectively, an 
auto demonstration outfit has been provided. This auto truck has been 
equipped with spraying apparatus, pruning tools, Babcock milk tester and 
other dairy apparatus, dairy record blanks, farm account blanks, a radiopti- 
can with sets of pictures for illustrative use, books, bulletins, pamphlets and 
other equipment. 

This outfit, in charge of a competent instructor or demonstrator, will visit 
towns all over the state on request, giving lectures and demonstrations along 
lines of most interest to that community. 

It is suggested that small groups of farmers meet together for general- 
conferences with the instructor in charge, after which visits to individual, 
farms will be made. 

The instructor will stay a week or more in each town if necessary. 

This is a practical, direct way of getting help from the College on your 
own farm. 

Arrangements should be made for the visit of the outfit to your town 
several weeks in advance in order that travel and time may be economized^ 
To make the necessary arrangements, write A. F. McDougall, Instructor 
in charge of Auto Demonstration Outfit, Amherst, Mass. 

10. Library Extension Work. 

The Library Extension Work consists principally of sending out to- 
the public libraries of the State collections of books and bulletins on agri- 
culture and related subjects. General collections of 10 to 30 books and 
bulletins are loaned to libraries, also special collections of smaller size on 
specified subjects such as fruit growing, dairying, poultry, bees, home 
economics, etc. These books may be kept for a period of from four to- 
eight weeks, according to the demand for them. The only expense is cost 
of transportation of the books both ways. 

The College Library also, as a part of the Extension Service work,, 
supplies information about books on agriculture and related subjects by 
answering letters concerning the selection and purchase of books, working 
up typewritten lists of references on certain subjects, and printing lists of 
books on special subjects. 

For information, advice or to secure these traveling libraries, write 
Charles R. Green, Librarian, Amherst, Mass. 

11. Agricultural Surveys 

In order to acquire definite information about existing conditions in, 
rural communities-, which may be later used as a basis for further extension, 
work, agricultural surveys are being made as rapidly as possible. The 
different organizations and officials in the community such as the town 
officers, superintendent of schools and teachers, clergymen, librarians and. 



■others usually cooperate in making the survey. The survey covers every 
•side of the community life including soil survey, farm management practices, 
and the educational^ sociaL religious and recreational life. Carefully pre- 
pared blanks have been provided on which the inventory is made. 

For information regarding these surveys and to make arrangements for 
them, write Alexander E. Cance, Supervisor of Agricultural Surveys, 
Amherst, Mass. 

12. Rural Business Organization 

The College realizes that the next important step in our rural life is to 
establish agriculture on a better business basis. 

Assistance can be given in the organization of cooperative buying and 
selling associations, rural credit, the finding of a better market for agri- 
cultural produce, and other lines of rural credit. 

Those wishing help along these lines should write Alexander E. Ca.vce, 
Amherst, Mass. 

13. M. A. C. Agricultural Improvement Association 

This is an organization of ex-students of the College who are farming 
in the state and who have banded themselves together for the purpose, 
according to the Constitution of the Association, of "promoting the agricul- 
tural development of the state by carrying on experiments and demonstra- 
tions—for the betterment of rural pursuits, — by using and encouraging the 
use of better seeds and animals, and by the organization of cooperative 
societies, — by the dissemination of literature bearing on recent agricultural 
investigations" — and so forth. 

High grade strains of corn and potatoes are being produced by the 
members for the Massachusetts seed trade. The growing of alfalfa is now 
being taken up. Work with animals will soon begin. 

For information as to seeds, membership and so forth, write Earnest D. 
Waid, Secretary, Amherst, Mass. 

14. Demonstration Farms and Plots 

The College believes that one of the most effective ways of teaching 
modern farm practice is to establish demonstrations (not experiments) in all 
sections of the state. These show a man on his own land and under his 
own conditions what the result of proper farm practices will be. 

The Faunce Demonstration Farm at Sandwich, Mass., which has been 
under the advisory direction of the College for more than three years, has 
proven to the Cape Cod region that small fruits, poultry and vegetables can 
be successfully grown there. The superintendent of this farm has also been 
active in promoting work leading to the development of that section of the 
-state. The management of these demonstration farms is usually carried on 
by a committee or board of trustees representing the farm and a committee 
appointed from the College, acting jointly. 

Demonstration plots showing proper fertilization of grass land and other 
crops, results of rotations, proper care of orchards, dairy management, land 
•drainage, seed selection and many other lines are being arranged on request. 

Those in charge of projects which they would like to turn into demon- 
stration work for the benefit of their communities or who wish to make 
arrangements for demonstration plots should write William D. Hurd, 
Director, Amherst, Mass. 

15. County or District Agricultural Advisers 

There is being worked out in Massachusetts on a state wide basis, 
in keeping with plans which have been adopted in other states, a plan for 
placing ultimately in every county of the state, or in some cases in a group 
•of towns, a man trained in agriculture to act as agricultural adviser for that 
county or district. The plan is being carried out cooperatively between_ the 
Office of Farm Management at Washington, the College and communities 
-themselves. Each helps pay the expense of maintaining the persons or per- 
son doing the work 

At the present time, two counties are doing this work and others are 
'ready to organize as soon as state and government funds are available. 



l 3 

Hampden County. — This work is organized under and directed by the- 
"Hampden County Improvement League." Three men have been engaged 
for work in that county alone. The headquarters of the league are at. 
Springfield. 

Mr. C. J. Grant is Agricultural Adviser and helps the farmers of the county 
in purchasing fertilizers, testing seeds, buying lime, establishing demon- 
stration plots, organizing dairy improvement associations, advising as to the 
crops adapted to certain soils, the keeping of farm accounts, drainage, and 
many other questions of general farm management. 

Mr. Albert R. Jenks is Horticultural Adviser and assists the farmers of: 
the county by establishing demonstration and renovation orchards, by 
giving demonstrations in pruning, spraying and packing fruit, bv establish- 
ing fruit growers associations for the buying of trees, spraying material, 
fruit packages and so forth, and for the cooperative marketing of the pro- 
ducts, and in many other ways. 

Mr. John A. Scheuerle is General Secretary and executive in charge of the 
work of Hampden County. Besides directing the work, he is helping the 
farmers of that county to establish better business cooperation, rural credit, 
better roads ; is encouraging rural sanitation and home economics in small 
communities; is organizing boys' and girls' clubs, civic improvement: 
associations, and is endeavoring to help towns to establish better systems 
of town administration, schools, churches and social organizations. 

For helps from the League, residents of Hampden County should write 
Mr. John A. Scheuerle, Secretary, Massasoit Building, Springfield. 

Barnstable County. — Co-operating with the Faunce Demonstration Farm 
at Sandwich, the superintendent of this farm acts as agricultural adviser for 
Barnstable County. 

Residents of this county are free to call on him for advice, without cost, 
on the adaptability of their land for certain crops, renovating old orchards 
and planting new ones, use of fertilizers and lime, proper methods of tillage, 
growing of windbreaks, combating insects and diseases, establishing dem- 
onstration plots, pruning and spraying demonstrations, problems of poultry 
farm management, keeping of farm accounts, lectures, questions of commun- 
ity organization and other things. Residents of Barnstable County should 
write or consult L. B. Boston, Superintendent of the Faunce Demonstra- 
tion Farm, Sandwich, Mass. 

Counties or communities in the state that wish to consider organizing 
themselves to secure district or county agricultural advisers, and who wish 
the co-operation of the state and the United States Department of Agricul- 
ture in organizing and directing the work, should write or consult William 
D. Hurd, Director, and State Representative of the Office of Farm Man- 
agement, U. S. D. A., Amherst, Mass. 

16. Student Extension Work 

For several years the regular student body of the College has done 
a good deal of extension work, especially in towns not far distant from Am- 
herst. 

The Social Service Secretary of the College, co-operating with the Exten- 
sion Service, expects to develop this work to a greater degree than ever 
before. 

Students of the College, so far as their time will permit, will give lectures 
and demonstrations on agricultural subjects, teach English and civics to • 
foreigners, coach and supervise athletic contests with boys and girls, help 
organize and conduct debating societies and bible classes and give talks on 
true sportsmanship and clean living, give musical entertainments and act as 
judges and helpers at fairs and other exhibits. 

To make arrangements for this work write Mr. Elgin Sherk, Social 
Service Secretary, Amherst, Mass. 

17. Advisory Work with Institutions and Individuals 

During the last few years the College has been co-operating to a con- 
siderable degree with the other state institutions, of which there are about 
thirty, in the handling of their extensive agricultural projects. The College 
feels that this co-operation and interchange of ideas is highly desirable, and 



14 



will be glad to make arrangements so that the best talent at the College may 
be secured to act in an advisory capacity at any institution within the state. 

Large numbers of calls are received at the College for help and advice as 
to the selection of farms, advice as to growing crops, management of dairies, 
soil treatment, equipment and other matters. The College is glad to render 
what assistance it can, but at present the force of instructors available for 
this work is not sufficient to meet all the demands. It is hoped a competent 
man will be available in the near future to do this work. 

Institutions or individuals desiring this kind of help should write Earnest 
D. Waid, Assistant Director, Amherst, Mass. 

18. Miscellaneous Helps from the College 

Below is given a list of subjects which may be suggestive of other lines of 
work by means of which the College may help you. 



Agricultural education. 
Agricultural literature. 
Agricultural organization. 
Babcock testing. 
Bacteriology. 
Books on agriculture. 
Breeders' organizations. 
Chemistry of foods, fertilizers, etc. 
■Civic betterment. 
Clearing land. 
Community organization. 
Co-operation. 
Crops under glass. 
Dairying. 
Dairy records. 

Dairy improvement associations. 
Diseases of live stock. 
Drainage. 
Drinking water. 
Farm bookkeeping. 
Farm buildings. 
Farmhouses, sanitation, etc. 
Farm crops. 
Farm machinery. 
Farm management. 
Farm managers. 
Feeds and feeding. 
Fertilizers, composition and use. 
Field crops. 
Floriculture. 
Forestry. 
Fruit culture. 
Gardeners and florists. 
Greenhouse construction and man- 
agement. 



Grass, meadows, hay making. 

Identification of plants. 

Identification of insects. 

Insects and insecticides. 

Landscape gardening. 

Live stock. 

Manures. 

Market gardening. 

Marketing farm products. 

Milk problems. 

Nursery work. 

Orchard management. 

Plant breeding. 

Plant diseases. 

Poultry. 

Purity of seeds. 

Rotation of crops. 

Rural credit. 

Rural economics. 

Rural sanitation. 

Rural social conditions. 

Schools of agriculture. 

Selection of farms. 

Small fruits. 

Soil composition. 

Special crops. 

Spraying. 

Statistics of agriculture. 

Stock breeding. 

Storage of fruits and vegetables. 

Tillage. 

Trees 

Tree diseases. 

Tree surgery. 

Veterinary science. 



Greenhouse crops. 

Inquiries on any of the above subjects directed to William D. Hurd, 
Director, Amherst, Mass., will be referred to the proper departments and 
will receive the best expert attention the College is able to give. 

19. Publications of The Extension Service 

The Extension Service has published the following circulars, bulletins 
and reports. A permanent mailing list of those desiring the publications 
and requesting that their names be placed on the list, is maintained. The 
publications are sent free. 

Short Courses Bulletins and Circulars (issued annually) : — 
Ten Weeks Course. 
Farmers Week. 
Apple Packing School. 
School for Tree Wardens. 



'5 

lieekeeping Course and Convention. 

Summer School of Agnculture and Country Life. 

School for Rural Social Workers. 

Poultry Convention Program. 

Conference of Rural Community Leaders. 

Correspondence Courses Circular and list of books recommended for read- 
ing in connection with the courses (issued annually). 

Lecture Course Circular, giving a list of lecturers and subjects on which 
they speak (revised each year). 

Reports : — 

Report of The Extension Service for Two Years, 1909 — 1911. 
Report of the Massachusetts Agricultural College Improvement Asso- 
tion, 1912. 

Blanks : — 

Three-day Milk Record Blanks and Daily Milk Record Blanks. 

Farm Accounts Blanks— Inventory and Journal sheets. (Fifty cents is 

charged for 50 of the sheets and one pair of loose leaf covers.) 
Demonstration Orchard information, sheet and contracts. 
Individual Cow Records. 
Herd Summary Sheets. 

Sample Constitutions for Dairy Improvement Associations and Breed- 
ers' Associations. 

Dairy Improvement Bulletin. 

" Facts for Farmers" a leaflet issued each month, containing timely infor- 
mation on fruit growing, dairying, animal husbandry, beekeeping, soils 
and other agricultural subjects. 

Library Leaflets : — 

No. 1. Selected List of References for Fruit Growers. 
No. 2. Useful Hooks for the Dairyman. 
No. 3. Good Books for Poultrymen. 
No. 4. Books on Vegetable Gardening. 

Primers : — 

Boys' and Girls' Corn Club Primer. 

Boys' and Girls' Sweet Corn and Bean Club Primer. 

Boys' and Girls' Tomato Club Primer. 

Boys' and Girls' Potato Club Primer. 
Those desiring these publications should write William D. Hurd, Direc- 
tor, Amherst, Mass. 

20. Co-operation with Other Organizations 

The agricultural industry in Massachusetts is an important one and is 
worthy of the best efforts of all existing organizations in its development. 
With adarge number of organizations in the field, the problem becomes a 
complex one. The College believes that the greatest progress can be made 
by a co-operative, federated effort on the part of all. 

The College desires to co-operate with and welcomes co-operation from 
such state organizations as the State Board of Agriculture, the State Grange, 
The State Board of Education, The Massachusetts Civic League, The Free 
Public Library Commission, The State Board of Health, The State High- 
way Commission, The Massachusetts Federation of Churches, The County 
Work of the Y. M. C. A., and other state wide organizations interested in 
questions of rural development. 

The College is glad to help local organizations, and welcomes suggestions 
from such organizations as town officers, local granges, farmers' clubs, 
woman's clubs, men's clubs, Y. M. C. A.'s, Y. W. C. A.'s, Boards of Trade, 
Village Improvement Societies, teachers, clergymen, librarians and others 
interested in agriculture and country life. 

To arrange work which may be mutually helpful, write or consult Wil- 
liam D. Hurd, Director, Amherst, Mass. 



i6 

21. Future Development of The Extension Service 

While some progress has been made during the last four years in organiz- 
ing the Extension Service, yet the College falls far short of doing what it 
might to build up the rural life of the state. 

The calls now made on Extension men and heads of departments far ex- 
ceed the ability of these men to meet them. More Extension instructors are 
needed for poultry work, fruit growing, dairying and animal husbandry, 
farm management, agronomy, boys' and girls' club work, rural engineering, 
home economics, agricultural survey work, rural business organization and 
many other lines. We believe it just as possible to develop sane, systematic 
and dignified instruction for the people of the state as it is for college stu- 
dents in college class rooms but, of course, it must be a different system, 
and requires men especially trained and temperamentally suited to the task. 
The further usefulness of the Massachusetts Agricultural College to the 
people of the Commonwealth depends entirely on appropriations granted 
for the development of the Extension Service. 

Any suggestions for developing the work or making it more effective will 
be gladly received by William D. Hurd, Director, Amherst, Mass. 



DIRECTORY OF WHERE TO GET INFORMATION FROM 
THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 

A. The College 

All questions regarding admission to the College, either to the freshman 
class or to advanced standing should be addressed to Professor P. B. Has- 
brouck, Registrar, Amherst, Mass. 

Those desiring college catalogs, the President's annual report and other 
pamphlets giving full information relative to entrance requirements, course 
of study, expenses, opportunities for student labor, and so forth, should ad- 
dress President Kenyon L. Butterfield, Amherst, Mass. 

B. The Experiment Station 

The Experiment Station conducts investigations in as many lines of 
agricultural science and practice as its funds will permit. It has charge of 
the inspection of commercial fertilizers, commercial feeding stuffs, and milk 
testing apparatus. Branch stations in cranberry and asparagus culture are 
maintained in other sections of the state. 

The Station considers the farmers' problems to be its problems, and de- 
sires to keep in touch with them. 

Requests for bulletins reporting the results of experiments and inspections 
and for other information on the work of the Station should be addressed to 
Massachusetts Agricultural Experiment Station, Amherst, Mass. 

C. The Graduate School 

Questions relating to courses offered leading to the degrees of Master 
of Science and Doctor of Philosophy, admission and work required, should 
be addressed to Dr. Charles E. Marshall, Director of the Graduate 
School, Amherst, Mass. 

D. The Extension Service 

Inquiries of a general nature regarding the work of the Extension Ser- 
vice, the Short Courses, publications or requests for new lines of work should 
be addressed to William D. Hurd, Director of the Extension Service, 
Amherst, Mass. 

STATEMENT OF THE OWNERSHIP, 
Management, circulation, etc., of the M. A. C. Bulletin. Published six times a year at 
Amherst, Mass. Required by the act of August 24, 1912. Editor, Massachusetts Agricul- 
tural College, Amherst, Mass. Business manager, Massachusetts Agricultural College, Am- 
herst, Mass.: Owner, Massachusetts Agricultural College, Amherst, Mass. 

[Signed] Ralph J. Watts, 
Secretary to the President, Mass. Ag-r. College. 
Sworn to and subscribed before me, I 
this 28th day of March, 1913. f 

[seal] [Signed] Fred C, Kenney, Notary Public. 

(My commission expires Jan. 29, 1916.) 




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Jftaasaclmsetts Agricultural 
College 

THE EXTENSION SERVICE 

Short Courses 




Vol. V, No. VI M. A. C. Bulletin 



Oct. 1913 



AMHERST, MASS. 
1014 



' :■■;•;<;.;. ipP@|^p:^pf^Sg^» 



THE 

M. A. C. BULLETIN 

AMHERST, MASS. 

Volume V Number VI 

October 1913 



Published Six Times a Year by the 
MASSACHUSETTS AGRICUL- 
TURAL COLLEGE. January, 
February, March, May, 
September, October 



ENTERED AS SECOND CLASS MATTER 
AT THE POST OFFICE, AMHERST, MASS. 



DATES OF SHORT COURSES 1914. 



Ten Weeks' Course . 

Apple Packing School 

Farmers' Week 

Tree Wardens' School 

Polish Farmers' Day 

Beekeepers' Course . 

Beekeepers' Convention 

Summer School. 

Boys' Agricultural Camps, July. 

Conference for Rural Leaders 

Poultry Convention . 



Jan. 5 to Mar. 13 

Jan. 21 to 28 

Mar. 16 to 20 

Mar. 24 to 27 

Mar. 26 

Date to be announced 

Date to be announced 

June 30 to July 28 

Exact dates to be announced 

July 28 to 31 

July 22 to 24 



FACULTY. 



KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD 

President and Head of Division of Rural Social Science. 

WILLIAM D. HURD Director of the Extension Service. 

ALEXANDER E. CANCE 

Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics. 

W. D. CLARK Professor of Forestry. 

SAMUEL COONS Instructor in Dairying. 

HENRY T. FERNALD Professor of Entomology. 

JAMES A. FOORD Professor of Farm Administration. 

GEORGE S. GAGE Assistant Professor of Animal Pathology. 

BURTON S. GATES Assistant Professor of Beekeeping. 

JOHN C. GRAHAM Professor of Poultry Husbandry. 

CHARLES R. GREEN Librarian. 

WILLIAM R. HART Professor of Agricultural Education. 

SIDNEY B. HASKELL Associate Professor of Agronomy. 

WILLIAM P. B. LOCKWOOD Professor of Dairying. 

E. M. McDONALD Instructor in Agronomy. 

F. A. McLAUGHLIN Assistant in Botany. 
JOHN A. McLEAN Associate Professor of Animal Husbandry. 
JAMES B. PAIGE Professor of Veterinary Science. 
ELVIN L. QUAIFE Instructor in Animal Husbandry. 
RALPH W. REES Extension Instructor in Pomology. 
FRED C. SEARS Professor of Pomology. 
ROBERT J. SPRAGUE Professor of Economics. 
E. J. CANNING Temporary Instructor in Floriculture. 
B. C. GEORGIA Assistant Professor of Market Gardening. 



NON-RESIDENT LECTURERS. 

To supplement the work given by the regular faculty, a number of 
men who have made conspicuous successes in their chosen fields will be en- 
gaged for lectures and demonstrations. 

[4] 



The Ten Weeks' Courses. 



ANNOUNCEMENT. 



THE short courses at the Massachusetts Agricultural 
College are offered to meet the needs of those, both 
young and old, who want to study principles and 
modern methods in agriculture and who for various 
reasons are unable to attend the four year courses. The work 
is planned to bring before the student the results of the latest 
investigations in agricultural science, and to point out their 
practical application. 

Instruction will be given by the regular faculty of the col- 
lege by means of lectures, recitations, laboratory, and practical 
work; from time to time they will be assisted by non-resident 
lecturers on special subjects. The work in the class-room will 
be supplemented by demonstration work in the laboratory, 
dairy room, greenhouse, and stables. The library of over 30,000 
carefully selected volumes offers exceptional opportunities for 
special study in agriculture, horticulture, and related sciences. 

Students will be required to elect courses to make not more 
than twenty-four nor less than twelve exercises each week. The 
arrangement of courses is such that students must follow cer- 
tain lines of work. Those electing Dairy Industry, Floricul- 
ture, or Horticulture, must also take courses in allied subjects, 
as noted in the description of these courses. In general agri- 
culture more latitude is allowed, but it is expected that students 
will show a definite purpose in the selection of work. All elec- 
tions, as well as any deviation from the regular rule, must be 
approved by the Director. 



5] 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION. 



A. Agricultural Group. 

1. Soil Fertility. Professor Haskell 

The nature of soils, their chemical and physical proper- 
ties. The improvement of " run-down " land. Tillage. Green 
manuring. Crop rotation. Drainage. Stable manures, their 
value, composition, preservation, and application. Commer- 
cial fertilizers, their nature and use. Fertilizers for different 
crops. The duplication of formulae. Limes and liming. 
Three lectures a week for ten weeks. 

2. Field Crops. Mr. McDonald 

The production of field crops for New England; species 
and varieties, agricultural characteristics, methods of culture, 
rotations, harvesting, and curing. The laboratory work will 
give the student practice in seed selection and testing for qual- 
ity, purity, and germination, and in corn and potato judging. 
Three lectures each week for ten weeks. Course 1 (Soil Fertil- 
ity) required. Laboratory registration limited to 40. 

3. Types and Breeds of Live Stock. 

Outlines of the market classes and grades of beef cattle, 
horses, sheep, and swine, placing emphasis upon the character- 
istics of each class and its adaptations. The characteristics, 
the adaptations, and so far as is possible the historic development 
of each of the more important breeds of live stock are carefully 
studied, also their distribution in America. Special emphasis 
is laid upon dairy-cattle and horses in the judging work. Three 
lecture periods, and two two-hour judging periods each week. 

4. Live Stock Feeding. 

A study of the physiology of nutrition, the composition of 
feed stuffs, and of rational economic feeding. The feeding of 
dairy cattle and the management for profitable milk production 

[61 



receive first attention. Similarly, the feeding of horses, of 
beef cattle, of sheep and swine, is studied. Three lecture periods 
per week. 

5. Live Stock Management. Mr. Quaife 

The care of live stock: Fitting for show, dipping, dehorning, 
trimming of feet, harnessing, halter making, and rope splicing, 
care of animals at parturition, etc. This course aims to pre- 
pare a young man for most of the problems that are certain to 
meet him in herd care and management. One two-hour labora- 
tory period per week. Laboratory fee of one dollar. 

6. Animal Breeding. J. A. McLean 

A discussion of the commoner problems pertaining to the 
breeding of live stock, their explanation and solution; inbreeding; 
cross-breeding; grading. The work of the most successful men 
in history will be studied. Time will be given to the study of 
pedigrees of the different breeds of dairy cattle and other stock. 
One lecture period, and one two-hour laboratory period per 
week. 

7. Dairying. Professor Lock-wood, Mr. Coons and Assistants 

Milk and milk production, creaming methods. Babcock 

and acid tests. Market milk handling. Ripening cream and 

butter making. Dairy Arithmetic. Dairy buildings, lighting, 

ventilation, and sanitation. 

_ , , ( 2 two-hour periods 

5 one-hour and { _ , , . , 

( 2 three-hour periods 

8. Dairy Bacteriology. Doctor Marshall 

The characteristics and functions of bacteria and their 
relation to the different branches of the dairy industry. The 
scientific basis for cream ripening, sterilization, pasteurization, 
control of fermentation, and the production of the best quality 
of market milk. Two lectures each week. 

9. Animal Diseases and Stable Sanitation. Doctor Paige 

Lectures upon some of the common diseases of live stock, 
giving special attention to methods of prevention, care, and san- 

[7] 



itation. The treatment of emergencies and accidents. How 
to keep animals healthy. Two lectures each week. 

10. Poultry Course. Professor Graham 

The course will consist of lectures on poultry house con- 
struction, winter egg production, incubation and brooding, 
feeds and feeding, and marketing poultry and eggs. Besides 
the lectures, there will be one or two demonstration periods per 
week, depending upon the size of the class. Demonstrations 
or practical work will be given on killing, picking, and capon- 
izing, sorting, and packing eggs for market, judging fowls for 
egg production, studying types, and studying construction of 
incubators and brooders. Our present equipment will enable 
us to demonstrate various methods in housing and feeding. 
Practical work in running incubators will be given to as many 
as our equipment will accommodate. Five exercises a week 
for ten weeks. 

B. Horticultural Group. 

11. Fruit Growing. Professor Sears 

The work in this course will deal with the practical side of 
the growing and marketing of fruits. Especial attention will 
be given to such questions as selection of site for the plantation, 
choice of varieties, grafting and budding, spraying, pruning, 
cultivation and cover crops, fertilizing the fruit plantation, 
packing, and marketing. Text books and lectures, supplemented 
with demonstrations; and whenever possible, actual work by 
the student. Five exercises each week for ten weeks. 

Students electing Horticulture will also be required to take 
Course 1, and it is recommended that they take Courses 14 
and 15. 

12. Market Gardening. Mr. Georgia 

A general survey of the market gardening business, together 
with a study of the most important problems involved, such as 
location, soils, fertilizers, crops, systems of cropping, markets, 
and marketing. Three lectures each week for ten weeks. 



13. Landscape Gardening. Professor Harrison 

The general principles of the art, the various styles of de- 
sign, the literature of landscape gardening, and some notice of 
important American masterpieces. Elementary problems in 
surveying, drafting, and designing. Plants, methods of con- 
struction, and planting. Two two-hour exercises each week. 
Class limited to 15. 

14. Floriculture. Mr. Canning 

This course is outlined with the idea of furnishing young 
men who have not the time to devote to a longer course, with 
the theoretical and practical considerations which are essen- 
tials for success in Floriculture. The course will cover, as 
thoroughly as time will permit, those aspects of the work of 
special interest to the grower. Some of the topics to be con- 
sidered are greenhouse construction, greenhouse details, such as 
ventilators, gutters, benches, etc., greenhouse furnishings and 
equipment, heating, florists' crops and florists' trade. 

All taking the course should bring a working suit. Satur- 
days there will be special trips to some of the most up-to-date 
floricultural establishments in the state. 

In addition to the regular lecture work of the course, it is 
expected that lectures will be given by experts in growing spe- 
cial crops, such as roses, carnations, violets, and orchids. Five 
lectures each week, and field trips on Saturday. 

Students electing this course will also be obliged to take 
Courses 1, 16, and 17. 

15. Forestry. Professor Clark 

Lectures given to acquaint short course students with the 
importance of conserving the forests and forest products. The 
value of the forests to the state and nation. Special attention 
given to the handling of the farm wood lot. One lecture a week 
for ten weeks. 

G. Related Sciences. 

16. Botany. Mr. McLaughlin 

A study of the structure, function, and diseases of green- 
house, garden, orchard, and field crops, together with methods 

[91 



of prevention, including spraying and the application of fungi- 
cides. One period each week will be devoted to laboratory 
work. Two lectures each week. 

17. Entomology. Professor Fernald 

A study of the insects causing most injury to farm, orchard, 
garden and greenhouse crops, and to domestic animals, with 
methods for their destruction or control. Closely correlated to 
the work in horticulture and agriculture. Three lectures each 
week. 

18. New England Rural Life. 

A course designed to acquaint Short Course students with 
the possibilities for the several lines of agriculture in New Eng- 
land. The work of the leading state organizations which are 
helping to build up New England country life will be presented 
by officers of each organization. This course is required of all 
Short Course students and takes the place of attendance at 
chapel and assembly, which was formerly required. Two lec- 
tures a week. 

19. Farm Accounts. Professor Foord 

Practical work in keeping farm accounts and records. A 
simple system by which profits and losses of the farm may be 
traced to their original sources. One exercise a week, each exer- 
cise to equal two hours. 

20. Mechanics. Professor Lockwood and Mr. Schroyer 

Care of boilers, engines, and dairy machinery, installing 
and lining shafts and pulleys; calculating speeds of pulleys, 
etc. Cement foundations and floors. Plans for farm and dairy 
buildings. One exercise of two hours each week. 

21. Rural Sanitary Science. Doctor Marshall 

The following subjects will be considered: Significance of 
sanitary science, theories of disease, dirt and its dangers, drink- 
ing water and its protection, sewage, methods of disposal and 
purification, ventilation, foods, flies, and mosquitoes in relation 
to sanitation, disinfectants, etc. Two lectures a week. 

f 101 



22. Beekeeping. Doctor Gates and Mr. Byard 

This course deals with fundamental and practical apicul- 
ture, co-related with horticulture (field and greenhouse market 
gardening, cranberry culture, fruit raising). The following sub- 
jects will be included: The natural history and behavior of 
bees, races, their handling and manipulation, handling of queens, 
wintering, comb and extracted honey production, the care of 
crops, diseases and their treatment, a thorough study of appli- 
ances. 

First hand experience in all phases of the subject is empha- 
sized. The large College collection of implements affords 
particular opportunities for demonstrations. The course will 
probably be concluded by a convention at which prominent 
authorities will attend. (Three periods, two lectures, and one 
laboratory.) 

23. Rural Improvement. Professor Waugh 

Civic art as applied to rural conditions. The improvement 
of roads, street trees, schoolhouses and grounds, public build- 
ings, farm buildings, farm planning, etc. The organization 
and management of village and country improvement societies. 
Two lectures a week. 

24. Marketing Farm Products* Doctor Cance 

A discussion of some of the practical problems confronting 
the farmer in the disposal of his produce and the purchase of 
agricultural supplies, and the best methods of meeting the prob- 
lems, — the farmer's market, co-operative societies, direct sale, 
use of parcel post, the motor truck, etc. (One hour a week, 
one credit.) 



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H H 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



TEN WEEKS' COURSE. 



Application Blank. 

Those desiring to make application for admission to the 
Ten Weeks' Course please fill out this blank. 

Name (Mr., Mrs., or Miss) 

Date of Birth 

Post Office Street Address 

State Present Occupation 

School last Attended 

Reference 

Name of person to notify in case of illness or accident 



Address 

After consulting the schedule on page 12, place an X before each course 
you wish to take. Send this blank to the Director. 



GROUP A 
Course Hours 

1. Soil Fertility 3 

2. Field Crops 3 

3. Types and Breeds of Live Stock 5 

4. Live Stock Feeding 3 

5. Live Stock Management 1 

6. Animal Breeding 2 

7. Dairying 9 

8. Dairy Bacteriology 2 
Animal Diseases and Stable San- 
itation 2 

Poultry Course 6 



9. 



10 



B 



GROUP 
Course 

11. Fruit Growing 

12. Market Gardening 

13. Landscape Gardening 

14. Floriculture 

15. Forestry 



GROUP C 

Course Hours 

16. Botany 2 

Entomology 3 

New Eng. Rural Life Required 



17. 
18. 
19. 
20. 



Farm Accounts 1 

Mechanics 1 

21. Rural Sanitary Science 2 

22. Beekeeping 2 

23. Rural Improvement 2 



13 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION. 



No entrance examinations are required, but students are 
advised to review their school work in English and arithmetic 
before entering. Practical experience in farm, garden, orchard, 
or greenhouse work will be an advantage. The courses are open 
to both, men and women. 

Students must be at least 18 years of age, and must furnish 
satisfactory evidence of good moral character. References 
are required and these are investigated before applicants are 
accepted. 

Application for admission should be made as early as pos- 
sible by filling out the blank on Page 13 of this bulletin. Those 
who register in courses in which the number of students is lim- 
ited, are required, in order to hold a place in the course, to send 
the $5 registration fee with the application blank. Those who 
do not register in limited courses, should pay the fee on the open- 
ing day of the courses, January 5. 

It is sometimes necessary, when the registration becomes 
too large, to limit the numbers in certain courses. Those who 
are late in entering are admitted only on consent of the instruc- 
tors of the courses. 

Students should report to the Director on Monday, January 
5, in order to begin work promptly on the morning of Janu- 
ary 6. 

EXPENSES AND OTHER INFORMATION. 



A registration fee of $5 is charged those who take the Ten 
Weeks' Course. This fee is payable upon the opening day of 
the courses, unless, as stated above, the student is desirous of 
taking courses which have a limited enrollment. 

Other expenses of taking this course are about as follows: 

Furnished rooms in private families . $1.50, $3.00 per week 

Board at College Dining Hall . . . $4.00 per week 

Board in private families .... $5.00, $6.00 per week 

A Lunch Counter is operated in connection with the Col- 
lege Dining Hall. Those who desire may obtain meals here 
a la carte at very reasonable prices. 

[15 1 



Students in each of the dairy courses must provide them- 
selves with two white wash suits, and a white cap for use in 
the practical dairy work. The cost in Amherst is about $1.25 
for suit and cap. 

A list of available rooms is furnished at registration time, 
and every effort will be made to see that all who come are com- 
fortably located. 

RULES AND REGULATIONS. 



Those who attend the short courses are expected to conduct 
themselves in a manner that will conform to the usages of good 
society. 

As a guide to those who come to the college for the first 
time the following extracts are taken from the regular rules of 
the college. 

" The customary high standard of college men in honor, 
manliness, self-respect, and consideration for the rights of 
others, constitute the standards of student deportment. 

" It should be understood that the college, acting through 
its President or any administrative officer designated by him, 
distinctly reserves the right not only to suspend or dismiss stu- 
dents, but also to name conditions under which students may 
remain in the institution." 

In past years both regular and short course students in 
the college have been required to attend chapel daily and assem- 
bly once a week. 

On account of lack of seats in the chapel, due to the increase 
of regular students, short course students in 1914 will not be 
required to attend chapel or assembly, but are required to attend 
the lectures on New England Rural Life which take the place 
of chapel and assembly. 

ORGANIZATIONS. 



During the past three years short winter course students 
have maintained an organization for social, recreative, and study 
purposes. This organization has met each week during the 
course. 

[161 



The Stockbridge Club is a student organization which holds 
meetings every week for the discussion of agricultural and hor- 
ticultural affairs. Its meetings are often addressed by well- 
known specialists. Membership is open to students of the short 
courses. 

The M. A. C. Christian Association meetings, conducted 
by students and outside speakers, are held regularly on Thurs- 
day evenings, at 6.45 o'clock, in the Stone Chapel. All short 
course students are cordially invited to attend these meetings. 

THE LIBRARY. 



The college library occupies the entire lower floor of the 
Chapel — library building — and contains nearly 30,000 vol- 
umes in addition to a large number of pamphlets. The equip- 
ment is such that the library ranks extremely well with the agri- 
cultural libraries of the country. Short course, as well as regu- 
lar students, are able to find splendid material in every line of 
college work, especially in agriculture, botany, entomology, and 
sociology. The reading room is provided with a variety of mag- 
azines, encyclopedias, and reference books, in addition to the 
newspapers and Agricultural weeklies. 

The library hours are from seven forty-five a. m. to nine 
p. m. every week day, excepting meal time, and from nine a. m. 
to two p. m. on Sundays. The librarian or his student assist- 
ants will always be on hand, ready and willing to be of assist- 
ance to short course students. 

Other Short Courses. 



APPLE PACKING SCHOOL. 
January 21 — 28, Inclusive. 

The work of this School, which will be conducted by the 
Department of Pomology, will be of a practical nature and in- 
clude both box and barrel packing. Persons taking the course 
will become familiar with the various styles of packs and will 
receive sufficient practice to enable them to do good com- 
mercial packing. 

f 17 1 



The work in packing will be supplemented by lectures on 
leading phases of commercial orcharding; such as planting, 
varieties, spraying, pruning, harvesting, marketing, and so 
forth. 

A fee of $5.00 to help pay for fruit and other materials used 
is charged for this course. This course is limited to 30 students : 

SCHOOL FOR TREE WARDENS. 



March 24 — 27. 

This school is held in response to a call from tree wardens 
and city foresters for instruction in the planting, care, and pres- 
ervation of trees. The State Forester and the Massachusetts 
Forestry Association co-operate with the College in giving the 
work. 

Instruction is given in tree planting, forestry practices, 
diseases of trees, insects affecting trees, spraying, pruning, tree 
surgery, sprayers and apparatus, shade tree surveys, civic 
improvement, duties of tree wardens, laws and regulations, 
and so forth. 

The course is held at the College about the fourth week in 
March and lasts from three to five days. An Extension School 
in these subjects will probably also be arranged at some con- 
venient point in the eastern part of the state. 

No registration or other fees are charged. The cost of 
board and room is low. For dates, detailed programs and other 
information, write William D. Hurd, Director, Amherst, Mass. 

FARMERS' WEEK. 



March 16 — 20, 1913. 

In order to reach those who cannot come to the college for 
a longer time, this very practical course, four days in length, 
will be given. The regular college equipment will be used, 
and the work of the regular faculty will be supplemented by lec- 
tures and demonstrations given by eminent men. 

The work will be divided into three sections: (1) General 
Agriculture, to include Farm Management, Farm Crops, Dairy- 

[18 1 



ing, Animal Breeding and Feeding,. Veterinary Science, and 
Bacteriology; (2) Horticulture, to include Fruit Growing, 
Market Gardening, Floriculture, and Forestry; (3) Farmers' 
Wives' Section, including lectures and demonstrations in Home 
Economics, Cookery, and problems of Home-Making. 

Features of the week will be the evening lectures by special- 
ists along agricultural lines, the conference pertaining to prob- 
lems of rural betterment aside from practical agricultural topics, 
a corn and grain show, and others. 

Other special features will be the usual corn, dairy, and 
fruit shows, all of which should be better than ever. 

Specially good examples of the dairy breeds of cattle and 
of draft horses will be used during this week and a parade of 
live stock will be made. 

Exhibit of poultry feeds, various types of houses, poultry 
house equipment, and inasmuch as our Incubator and Brooder 
Departments will be running to their fullest capacity, guides 
will be furnished to conduct visitors about the poultry plant. 

The Massachusetts Dairymen's Association, M. A. C. 
Agricultural Improvement Association, and other organizations 
will hold their annual meetings at the college this week. 

Complete program will be published and sent on request 
about February 15. 

COURSE IN BEEKEEPING. 



Dates to be announced. 

The college has recently come into possession of a number 
of swarms of bees which, with the other equipment to be added, 
will afford a fine opportunity for those interested to get some 
practical information on this subject. 

The course will be under the direction of Dr. Burton N. 
Gates. The following courses will be given: 

1. Practical Phases of Beekeeping, Dr. Burton N. Gates 

2. Crops for Honey Bees, Dr. William P. Brooks 

3. Relation of Bees to the Pollination of Plants, 

Dr. George E. Stone 

4. Origin, and Evolution of the Honey Bee, Dr. Henry T. Fernald 

5. Bees, and Bee Keepers' Supplies, Dr. James B. Paige 

F191 



Annual Convention and Field Day. 



Date to be announced. 

The features of this convention will be lectures, demon- 
strations by authorities of national reputation, as well as dis- 
plays by inventors, manufacturers, supply merchants, and 
queen rearers. 

A Special Invitation. 

Is extended to all beekeepers to display and demonstrate in- 
ventions, implements, or methods. If table space is desired, 
or special equipment is to be prepared, notice should be sent to 
Dr. Burton N. Gates, Amherst, Mass., at least two or three 
weeks before the convention. The college will provide cov- 
ered tables for the exhibits. 

By correspondence in advance every effort will be made to 
arrange for the comfort of visitors. 

The Summer School. 

June 30— July 28, 1914. 



ANNOUNCEMENT. 

The Summer School of Agriculture of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College will open June 30, 1914, for a term of five 
weeks. This will be the sixth session of this Summer School, 
those of 1907 to 1912 having been highly successful. The 
experience of these five years will aid in making material im- 
provements in the session of 1914. 

The work of the Summer School was designed originally 
for school teachers, and the attendance has been largely of that 
class. Special attention will be given to the needs of teachers 
again this year. It has been found, however, that there are 
many persons who seek a general knowledge of theoretical and 
practical agriculture and who can come to the College conven- 
iently during the summer season. Extended courses will be 
offered for the benefit of such persons also. 

[20 1 



The following courses will probably be offered in 1914: 

Soils and Tillage Bird Life 

Field Crops Insect Life 

Domestic Animals Entomology 

Dairying Beekeeping 

Poultry Husbandry Home Economics 

Fruit Growing Domestic Science 

Practical Gardening Home and School Gardening 

Trees and Shrubs High School Agriculture 

Forestry Home Floriculture 

Landscape Gardening Agricultural Economics 

Elementary Chemistry Rural Sociology 

Agricultural Chemistry Rural Literature 

Plant Life Agricultural Education 

Cryptogamic Botany Organized Play and Recreation 

Arts and Crafts 

From these courses it will be possible to make up programs 
of work suitable to the needs of almost everyone, but especially 
of school teachers, principals, superintendents, school committee- 
men, farm owners, householders, suburban residents, clergy- 
men, pastors, preachers, social workers, and those who have 
only a general interest in agriculture. Persons who are in 
doubt as to what courses will best suit their needs had better 
correspond with the Director of The Extension Service, who will 
gladly advise in all such matters. 

Special courses covering two weeks are offered especially 
for clergymen, librarians, and other rural leaders. 



GENERAL PLANS. 



From the courses offered, each student may elect courses 
of not less than ten or more than fifteen exercises a week, unless 
a larger or smaller amount of work is allowed by the Director. 
These courses include a large amount of field work, observa- 
tion trips, out-door exercises and laboratory experiments. 

[211 



Besides these, general field exercises will be arranged for 
one afternoon of each week. These will be on topics of interest 
to all. Class excursions will be arranged for every Wednesday 
afternoon, and. more extended excursions for the whole school 
will be planned for every Saturday. These excursions will 
be personally conducted by members of the Faculty, as hereto- 
fore. In the past, they have proven a very enjoyable feature of 
the work. 

Round tables and special discussions will be arranged by 
various instructors, as their courses require. 

A course of evening lectures on popular topics relating to 
the work of the school will be a feature of the general program. 
Several able lecturers are to be engaged for this course. Like 
everything else connected with the Summer School, this lecture 
course is entirely free to all students. 

The expenses are low. Amherst is situated in one of the 
most noted historical and educational centers in this country. 
Anyone interested in problems pertaining to country life should 
not fail to attend. A descriptive circular can be had March 
1, 1914. 

BOYS' AGRICULTURAL CAMPS. 



During July. Dates to be announced. 

The Boys' Camp is arranged in order that boys from rural 
districts and small towns may receive some instruction in agri- 
culture, clean, wholesome sports, and that they may have im- 
pressed upon them their responsibilities as coming members of 
society. Teachers, clergymen, Y. M. C. A. workers are espe- 
cially urged to send boys who will be benefited by the instruc- 
tion given at this Camp. 

The Camp is under the strictest military discipline. Boys 
who do not care to conform to this are not expected to come. 
Not more than forty-two boys — reservation being made for 
three from each county — will be taken at one time. A suc- 
cession of these camps, each lasting one week, may be arranged 
during July. The cost to each boy has in the past, been seven 
dollars for the week. This fee helps defray the cost of main- 
taining the camp, meals, instruction, lectures, and so forth. 

[22 1 



The daily program consists of Camp duty, flag raising, and 
so forth; agricultural lessons, talks on hygiene, good citizen- 
ship and so forth; play and recreation, instruction in handi- 
crafts, photography, evening camp fires, and lectures by men 
prominent in boys' work. 

POULTRY CONVENTION. 



July 22 — 24, 1914. 

The attendance at the Poultry Convention last summer 
indicates that the latter part of July is the best time of the 
year to hold such a meeting. The expressions of appreciation 
and requests that the event be made an annual affair justify us 
in announcing that a similar Convention will be held July 22 — 
24, 1914. This Convention is held in order to give a large num- 
ber of poultrymen, who cannot come to the college for a longer 
time, practical instruction in modern methods of breeding, 
feeding, poultry house construction, operation of incubators 
and brooders, selecting and judging poultry for utility and for 
show, marketing poultry products, etc., a convention lasting 
nearly a week will be held on the dates given above. The 
week will be filled with practical talks and demonstrations. 
Some of the leading professional and practical men in this coun- 
try will be engaged to supplement the work of the regular fac- 
ulty. 

No charges aside from cost of room and board are made 
those who come for this course. 

CONFERENCE OF RURAL LEADERS. 



July 28— August 31. 

The Conference of Rural Leaders which has been held as a 
closing feature of the Summer School will take place as usual. 

It is hoped the following organizations will co-operate 
with the College by furnishing teachers and lecturers for their 
respective sections: The Federation of Churches of Massachu- 
setts, The State Board of Education, The Free Public Library 
Commission, The Massachusetts Civic League, The State 

[23 1 



Board of Health, The County Work of the Young Men's Chris- 
tian Association, The National Board of the Young Women's 
Christian Association, The New England Home Economics 
Association, The Russell Sage Foundation, and The State 
Grange. 

Definite class instruction will be given each morning. The 
afternoons will be given up entirely to special and general con- 
ferences, demonstrations of organized play, recreation, etc. 
The evenings will be given over to music and lectures by the 
most eminent men who are making a study of rural sociology, 
economics and education. 

The Rural Social Service exhibits will be more elaborate 
and extensive than in 1913. 

The object of this conference is to acquaint those who are 
leaders in their respective communities with the work that is 
going on, not only in Massachusetts, but in New England and 
other parts of the world, and to give them renewed inspiration 
and enthusiasm for larger and more intelligent efforts. 

Teachers, clergymen, grange officers, librarians, county 
Y. M. C. A. workers, town officers, boards of health, officers of 
village improvement societies, homemakers, school officers and 
all others interested in community development are cordially 
invited to attend this Conference. The expenses for board and 
room are low. There are no tuition or registration fees. 

A complete program will be published next June and can 
be had by making application for it. 

Helps for Those Who Connot Come to Any 
of the Short Courses. 



LECTURE COURSES AND PRACTICAL 
DEMONSTRATIONS. 

The public lecture work of the faculty has been system- 
atized. Granges, Famers' Clubs, Young Men's Christian 
Associations, Boards of Trade, Women's Clubs, Village Im- 
provement Societies, and other organizations can secure lec- 
tures covering agricultural and allied subjects either singly, 
or courses of several lectures can be arranged for. Practical 

[241 



demonstrations, such as spraying, milk testing, stock judging, 
mixing fertilizers, fruit grading and packing, and others of a 
similar nature, will also be given when application is made for 
them. Organizations named above can arrange with the col- 
lege to have a series of evening meetings, at which agricultural 
subjects and topics pertaining to rural life will be presented in 
a popular way. It should be understood that the number of 
men available for this work is at present limited; hence early 
application is desirable. 

Send for circular giving lecturers' names and subjects. 

Correspondence Courses. 



So many calls have come to the college for lessons by cor- 
respondence that courses in Soils and Soil Improvement, Man- 
ures and Fertilizers, Field Crops, Farm Dairying, Fruit Grow- 
ing, Market Gardening, Animal Feeding, Floriculture, Farm 
Accounts, Agriculture in the Elementary Schools, Agricultural 
Education, Beekeeping, Forestry, Shade Tree Management, 
Entomology, and Poultry Husbandry have been prepared. 

A small fee to cover the cost of postage, etc., is charged in 
each course. 

Send for circular fully describing these. 

OTHER LINES OF WORK CONDUCTED BY THE EX- 
TENSION SERVICE. 

Through The Extension Service the Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural College endeavors to help all the people in the Com- 
monwealth who are interested in securing agricultural informa- 
tion. A corps of field agents is being engaged to carry 
up-to-date information to all who ask for it. 

The college is now prepared to do definite, organized work 
in the following lines: 

Educational work in : 
Extension Schools Community Organization 

Exhibits at Fairs, etc. Agricultural Surveys 

Demonstration Trains Farmers' Business Corporation 

[25 1 



Fruit-growing 

Dairying 

Animal Husbandry 

Poultry Management 

Farm Management (Co-operating 

with U. S. D. A.) 
Civic Betterment 
Agricultural Education (Boys' and 

Girls' Clubs, etc.) 
Home Economics 



Rural Credit Systems 

Demonstration Plots 

County or District Agricultural Ad- 
visors 

Advisory Work With Institutions 
and Individuals 

Auto Demonstration Outfit 

Publications 

Advice by Personal Conferences and 
Letters 



For further information, regarding any of the activities 
of the Extension Service or to register in any of the Short Courses, 
write or apply to 

WM. D. HURD, 

Director, Extension Service, 
M. A. C, 

Amherst, Mass. 



26 



DIRECTORY — INFORMATION MAY BE SECURED FROM THE 
MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 
AS INDICATED BELOW. 



A. The College. 

Those desiring college catalogs, the President's annual report, and other 
pamphlets giving full information relative to entrance requirements, course 
of study, expenses, opportunities for student labor, and so forth, should ad- 
dress President Kenyon L. Butterfield, Amherst, Mass. 

All questions regarding admission to the College, either to the freshman 
class or to advanced standing should be addressed to Professor P. B. Has- 
brouck, Registrar, Amherst, Mass. 

B. The Experiment Station. 

The Experiment Station conducts investigations in as many lines of 
agricultural science and practice as its funds will permit. It has charge of 
the inspection of commercial fertilizers, commercial feeding stuffs, and milk 
testing apparatus. Branch stations in cranberry and asparagus culture are 
maintained in other sections of the state. 

The Station considers the farmers' problems to be its problems, and de- 
sires to keep in touch with them. 

Requests for bulletins reporting the results of experiments and inspections 
and for other information on the work of the Station should be addressed to 
Massachusetts Agricultural Experiment Station, Amherst, Mass. 

C. The Graduate School. 

Questions relating to courses offered leading to the degrees of Master 
of Science and Doctor of Philosophy, admission and work required, should 
be addressed to Dr. Charles E. Marshall, Director of the Graduate School, 
Amherst, Mass. 

D. The Extension Service. 

Inquiries of a general nature regarding the work of the Extension Ser- 
vice, the Short Courses, publication or requests for new lines of work should 
be addressed to William D. Hurd, Director of the Extension Service, Am- 
herst, Mass. 

STATEMENT OF THE OWNERSHIP 

Management, circulation, etc., of the M. A. C. Bulletin. Published six times a year at Am- 
herst, Mass. Required by the act of August 24, 1912. Editor, Massachusetts Agricultural 
College, Amherst, Mass. Business manager, Massachusetts Agricultural College, Amherst, 
Mass. Owner, Massachusetts Agricultural College, Amherst, Mass. 

[Signed] Ralph J. Watts, 

Secretary to the President, Mass. Agr. College. 

Sworn to and subscribed before me, ) 
this 28th day of March, 1913. J 

{SEAL] [Signed] Fred C. Kenney, Notary Public. 

(My commission expires Jan. 29. 1916.) 

[27 1 



Press of 
LORING-AXTELL COMPANY 

Springfield, Mass. 



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